Teresa Seeger-Gesser
Teresa Seeger-Gesser
  • Hometalker
  • Crawfordville, FL

Country French Dresser


While shopping at a local thrift store, I found this adorable Dresser wedged in a corner and bought it. Ugh, found the very hard to notice damage at home.
Country French Dresser
This Dresser was in need of repair. It looked as if it may have been in storage and suffered water damage.
Thrift Store find .
I removed drawers, no need to clean exterior as it was to be sanded.
Sanding with orbital sander
Inside the Dresser ancient bug sacs were found and removed by scraping and throughly vacuumed.
Dresser was cleaned
Homemade chalk paint was made ( plaster of Paris, water, paint of choice )
Bad damage being repaired.
Wood filler was used to build up side panel of Dresser and sanded. This process was repeated several times.
Painted in a soft French Grey
A stencil was downloaded, and the projector transfer method was used. First penciled, then paint pen.
Chose Stencil
Dark wax was applied after lightly distressing.
Dark wax
Finished !
Side note - now being used as side table
Finished side
Sides turned out great!
The sides are very smooth - you would never know there was damage. The pics are shadowy - sorry 😀

Suggested materials:

  • Homemade chalk paint, sander, stencil, paint pen

Have a question about this project?

9 questions
  • Linda Dodd
    on Sep 24, 2016

    What is the recipe for your chak paint please?

    • Kimberly Wrinkle
      on Sep 24, 2016

      Equal amounts of paint & plaster of Paris

    • Teresa Seeger-Gesser
      on Sep 24, 2016

      3 parts paint, 1 part water, SMALL amounts of water. Mix P.O.P with enough water to get a heavy, creamy texture, stir, stir, stir! Add paint, stir , stir, stir! You do not want any lumps or grittiness in POP before adding your paint. Any color, use latex paint 😀

    • Teresa Seeger-Gesser
      on Sep 24, 2016

      3 parts paint, 1 part water, SMALL amounts of water. Mix P.O.P with enough water to get a heavy, creamy texture, stir, stir, stir! Add paint, stir , stir, stir! You do not want any lumps or grittiness in POP before adding your paint. Any color, use latex paint 😀

    • Teresa Seeger-Gesser
      on Sep 24, 2016

      3 parts paint, 1 part water, SMALL amounts of water. Mix P.O.P with enough water to get a heavy, creamy texture, stir, stir, stir! Add paint, stir , stir, stir! You do not want any lumps or grittiness in POP before adding your paint. Any color, use latex paint 😀

    • Lori
      on Sep 24, 2016

      1/4 cup Plaster of Paris 1/4 cup warm water 1 cup paint latex or satin SEAL with wax

  • Linda Goins
    on Sep 24, 2016

    How do you make homemade chalk paint

    • Teresa Seeger-Gesser
      on Sep 24, 2016

      3 parts paint, 1 plaster of paris, Small amounts of water to mix. Mix plaster of Paris with small amount of water until a creamy but slightly thick consistency is achieved. Stir, stir, stir! No lumps or grittiness! Add paint, stir, stir, stir! I usually use 1/3 cup plaster of Paris to one cup paint.

  • Julie Jordan Parker
    on Sep 24, 2016

    How do you get the distressed look?

  • Annie
    on Sep 24, 2016

    What is the projector transfer stencil method please

    • Teresa Seeger-Gesser
      on Sep 25, 2016

      The projector method is when you use a projector, in a dark room, it allows you to adjust the size of your image to be in proportion to your piece. Print a small copy of your image, place under projector. Adjust by moving close for small image, farther away for larger image. I highly recommend using light pencil to trace projected image.

  • Deanna Young
    on Sep 24, 2016

    Why use chalk paint? Is it what gives it the antique look? And what is dark wax?

    • ALLYSON DUNCAN
      on Sep 25, 2016

      I'm going to go ahead and answer this question if I may: chalk paint is generlly used because you don't need to sand, or strip your piece before painting, Also chalk paint will adhere to ANYTHING!! (glass, vinyl, laminate even and, of course, any and all kinds of wood, etc). It dries to a matte finish and wax if generally applied afterwards as a sealer. These finishing waxes come clear or in stain colors from light to dark and everything in-between. By using a darker stained wax over the light color paint, Teresa achieved the antique you're asking about. I hope this helps you some.I'm not a pro but I have a number of projects using chalk paint under my belt and it's become everyone's go-to of late because of how little prepping needs to be done before hand. Of course, as with Teresa's dresser, if your piece needs sanding because of deep scratches and the like of has dents and holes that need to be filled before painting that's another story. But, if this piece hadn't had damage, then Teresa could cleaned it to remove and dust and dirt, let that dry and gone right to painting without worrying about dealing with the original finish in any way. Try it - odds are, you'll LOVE it. Allyson

    • Teresa Seeger-Gesser
      on Sep 25, 2016

      If I may, it never would have been painted if it had been mint condition. Wood filler was used for repairs, it is stainable, however, since the damaged was a large area, I opted to paint it.

    • Deanna Young
      on Sep 26, 2016

      Wow it sounds exactly what I've been looking for! One more question if I may, what do I ask for when shopping for the wax? I can't wait to try try this. Thank you all for answering my questions I appreciate it very much.

    • ALLYSON DUNCAN
      on Sep 27, 2016

      Odds are you'll find the waxes right next to the chalk paints in the craft store anyway but, in the event that you don't, just ask for the sealing waxes that are applied over chalk paint. Remember, the waxes come in clear and in stains from light to dark - it depends entirely on the final finish you want to achieve. I hope this helps!

  • Sherry Salem Niles
    on Sep 24, 2016

    What proportion of paint water and plaster of paris for a gallon

    • Sarah
      on Sep 25, 2016

      1/3 cup plaster 1/3 cup water 1cup paint (make sure to use paint WITHOUT primer added to it, or it won't work)

  • Deanna Perata
    on Sep 25, 2016

    What does this mean?? A stencil was downloaded, and the projector transfer method was used. Where did you download it from? and what is a projector transfer method?

    • Nicole Sandoval Davis
      on Sep 25, 2016

      What she was saying was, she found a stencil online and usually with an online stencil you usually print it then cut it out to make your own stencil, however, she downloaded it and used it w/ her projecter to project onto her dresser. Once it was projected onto her dresser, she outlined the picture with a pencil, then later with a marker or a very small paint brush. You can get stencils online from many websites. Some cost money, many are free. You have to search yourself using any one of the Internet search engines. Many people choose to use overhead projectors because it allows you to make the stencils larger than what it would normally be. You can also project stencils or pictures onto just about anything. This method is one of the older methods for transferring things onto a project piece. There are many other methods that, I think work much more affectively, just because I'm not good with free hand drawing, even though you're tracing over lines. The Graphics Fairy blog has many transfer methods that you can try. The Projector transfer method is just one out of many that you can use. I hope this helps at least a little.

    • Carol
      on Sep 25, 2016

      projector method is very nice if you are doing a mural on a wall.

    • Teresa Seeger-Gesser
      on Sep 26, 2016

      Thank you Nicole Sandoval Davis! 🌸

  • Gail Tilson
    on Sep 28, 2016

    Does the chalk paint dry smooth to the touch when using the plaster of Paris? I have an old bedroom set I want to do in this style. Thanks

    • Teresa Seeger-Gesser
      on Sep 28, 2016

      Always mix water & plaster of paris well! Really well. After you've stirred it really well, stir it again! No grit - no lumps! Really scrape the bottom of the container you're using, I like to use clear containers! Just keep scraping the bottom and stirring. With chalk paint you really do not need to prep much - your piece.

    • Gail Tilson
      on Sep 29, 2016

      Thanks much. Could you designate a blender of sorts for mixing those two ingredients you think?

    • Andra Collier
      on Oct 12, 2016

      I have a blender I only use for chalk paint. I have made the chalk paint with plaster of Paris. It was fine but experimenting with different amounts of ingredients is best to get results you want. I think I want to add baking soda to my next paint for what I hope to have more depth to the paint.

    • Andra Collier
      on Oct 12, 2016

      I have a blender I only use for chalk paint. I have made the chalk paint with plaster of Paris. It was fine but experimenting with different amounts of ingredients is best to get results you want. I think I want to add baking soda to my next paint for what I hope to have more depth to the paint.

    • Andra Collier
      on Oct 12, 2016

      I have a blender I only use for chalk paint. I have made the chalk paint with plaster of Paris. It was fine but experimenting with different amounts of ingredients is best to get results you want. I think I want to add baking soda to my next paint for what I hope to have more depth to the paint.

  • Fiona Beer
    on Oct 30, 2016

    What paint pens did you use as I want to ty them for graphics over chalk paint

Join the conversation

3 of 47 comments
  • Teresa Seeger-Gesser
    on Oct 19, 2016

    Thanks 😀

  • Nancy Spencer Carlson
    on Nov 19, 2016

    I want to say "BAD!! Painting an old antique dresser like that?!" But it's beautiful. And it IS yours. I figure that furniture is like china - if you don't use it, what good is it. Make it work in your own setting. If someone else wants to strip it years down the road, you won't be within earshot of their complaining! lol! Nice job.

    • Teresa Seeger-Gesser
      on Nov 19, 2016

      I couldn't agree with you more! I would not have touched it had it been in good condition. However, the side of the Dresser had quite a bit of damage that had to be "fixed," leaving me no choice but to paint it. Thank you Nancy for stopping by, ❤️

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