Tyler Golberg
Tyler Golberg
  • Hometalker
  • Alexandria, MN
Asked on Oct 28, 2013

Type of Plant?

Angie WDouglas Hunt360 Sod (Donna Dixson)
+93

Answered

I haven't paid much attention to this bush since moving into my new house, but it turned bright red this fall. I love the color, but I have no idea what type of plant it is. Any guesses?
type of plant, gardening
30 of 69 answers
  • Jan249064
    on Oct 28, 2013

    This is a burning bush - the are not sold in MA anymore and are illegal to buy. We have 3 in front of our house and they grow INSANE huge! Lovely bush though :-)

  • TRD Designs Ltd.
    on Oct 28, 2013

    Euonymus Alatus.....Burning Bush

  • James Bryan C
    on Oct 28, 2013

    They are also called "Fire on the Mountain" but most call it the Burning Bush

  • Fay Sessions
    on Oct 28, 2013

    it is a burning bush and you can trim them back to control them .

  • Debbie Gilroy
    on Oct 28, 2013

    a burning bush, if you cut it back it will get bushier. I really cut mine back one year and it looks great now

  • Judith Horton-Holm
    on Oct 28, 2013

    fire bush

  • Liz Smith
    on Oct 28, 2013

    Burning bush, we just looked at buying them yesterday. Make wonderful fall displays

  • Becky Griffin
    on Oct 28, 2013

    A burning bush. They will make a great hedge. I have about 40 down a horse fence. The older ones are about 10 feet tall. A nice green in summer. Then beautiful in the fall

  • Van193369
    on Oct 28, 2013

    Burning bush. I have 3 in my yard that is looking good right now.

  • Vivian S
    on Oct 29, 2013

    I also have a dwarf burning bush. It grows more slowly I think, but I didn't get to trim it this spring and it is at least 6 feet around. If you get one, be sure to plant it in sun so it gets great color. I planted mine on the north side of the house and, although it does turn a lovely red, it doesn't get really brilliant red.

  • Shirley Burkett
    on Oct 29, 2013

    I bought one about 10 years ago it is now 10 feet tall and about 8 feet around we have had to trim the back off against our house it is too big to move I don't want it to die so I guess we well keep triming!

  • Marlene Wilson
    on Oct 29, 2013

    I live in West Virginia and I have never heard of this bush,but it sure is a dandy. Good luck with yours.

  • Douglas Hunt
    on Oct 29, 2013

    Burning bush is so invasive in the Northeast that its sale is banned in Massachusetts, Connecticut and New Hampshire. It has naturalized through much of the eastern half of the country. Anyone considering planting it should read this article from Dave's Garden first: http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/3082/

    • Becky Griffin
      on Oct 31, 2013

      Here is a picture of the first 10 bushes, we planted over 15 years ago. We have not found them to be invasive. But I do see the birds do enjoy. So can see why they could be. My dogs love to lay under them. She in the upper part of the picture

  • Dana Huempfner
    on Oct 29, 2013

    definately a burning bush have 2. Jane- why r they illegal in MA?

  • Tyler Golberg
    on Oct 29, 2013

    Here is a close-up of the leaves and branches. I didn't realize how odd the branches are until looking closer.

  • Shirley H
    on Oct 29, 2013

    Burning/beauty bush-here's a pic of mine, about 20 yrs old; started out in a 1 gal. size container from a big box (gasp) store. Blue birds in it yesterday after the tiny red berries.

    , When we get an early snow it is magnificent when the cardinals fly in to eat the berries
    • Bonnie Bassett
      on Oct 29, 2013

      @360 Sod (Donna Dixson) why can,t they eat the red berries I asked my neighbor today what kind of bush is in his yard and he said it is a burning bush and that they are not invasive.Invasive or not I want one in my yard they are gorgeous in the fall.

  • Shirley H
    on Oct 29, 2013

    I like being able to feed the birds without buying them birdseed, the bush gets bigger & prettier every year-if that's ":invasive" so be it.

  • 360 Sod (Donna Dixson)
    on Oct 30, 2013

    Well Bonnie, what goes in must come out. So what happens is that the bird spreads the seed through it's' digestive system. You who are in control of your space, this is ok....for the natural areas, not so much. The shrub will develop unfettered by the bounds of a polite gardener that is vigilant against overgrowth. Soon the native plants are crowded out. Then the wildlife that feeds on the native growth is diminished to an endangered level and there ya go...you have an entire ecosystem wiped out by an invasive thug planted by a single bird munching on the seeds from that beautiful Burning Bush. Your neighbor doesn't know this because your neighbor keeps all that in check in their own personal space and isn't aware of what happens to those seeds when it leaves in the belly of a bird. The problem is that too this is a relatively new 'discovery' so you will see the Burning Bush sold in even reputable nurseries and in books by gardners. It is not a widely known thug plant such as something like the dreaded Kudzu vine. You will see even in my own earlier posts on Hometalk I talked about what a wonderful fall color it brings. But upon further research (thank you @Douglas Hunt ) I have come to the conclusion that it is indeed a plant that needs to be avoided if possible. There are other plants that give us some wonderful color so that it won't be missed. Hope that helps you. If you type in Burning Bush and invasive into google you can find many articles by much more learned folks than myself. :)

    • Tracey T
      on Oct 31, 2013

      @360 Sod (Donna Dixson) I have to agree Donna, there are so many other beautiful plants and bushes that would be a good alternative to this bush. I am not saying she is wrong for keeping it though, the choice is hers and hers alone. I on the other hand cannot afford to have this on my shoulders only because I have never seen it down here and my luck I would cause big problems..LOL Have a wonderful Halloween Donna and everyone else

  • Paula Canup
    on Oct 30, 2013

    In Franklin, NC, these are planted along the median on the highways going into town, and they are gorgeous....not at all invasive around here!

  • Douglas Hunt
    on Oct 30, 2013

    @360 Sod (Donna Dixson) does a very good job of explaining how burning bush becomes a problem. Just because you do not see lots of seedlings in your yard does not mean the plant is not invasive. Birds cause "long dispersal events," spreading it far and wide, where it crowds out native species in the environment.

    • @Douglas Hunt I agree Douglas. I had a few Burning bushes when I first moved in. They are just so much upkeep. I would cut them down half their size and by fall they would more than double..."Out of Control" I think the only place for these beauties are in a location where they are free to grow. Not in our landscaping in the front of the house.

  • Shirley H
    on Oct 30, 2013

    Point well taken Mr. Hunt & Ms. Dixon; should mine ever die out, I promise not to replace it with another like species. Until then, I will continue to enjoy it & all the fine feathered friends it does help support.

  • Jean DeSavage
    on Oct 30, 2013

    Though we like the birds visiting our homes, we could remove the berries, so that the birds can't carry them forward. That would be one way to slow the spread of these beautiful bushes.

    • @Jean DeSavage Agree. If you cut the bush in the fall then next years berries won't appear. This is one way to control the burning bush.

  • June
    on Oct 30, 2013

    Doug is absolutely right about the euonymous being invasive. We have q few growing on the edge of our property now. But their red color right now is glorious.

  • April E
    on Oct 30, 2013

    while the old standard burning bush is considered invasive there are varieties that are sterile being developed therefore not invasive. as with many types of useful or beautiful plant that has been considered invasive also while on the subject of invasive plant please remember while many a plant may be considered invasive where one person lives, where someone else is it may not be invasive at all or even a annual. also some plants considered invasive such as mint or crown vetch do have thier uses such as erosion control where there grab and grow style makes them useful.

  • Bonnie Bassett
    on Oct 30, 2013

    It makes sense if they really do damage to other plant life but there seems to be lots of room up here in NH for them to grow with other species. To tell the truth I see them in other ppl's yards but I have not noticed very many in the wild, I will keep a look out for them

    • Shirley H
      on Oct 31, 2013

      @Bonnie Bassett I live in the middle of about 80 acres of wild & wooly woods that I ramble around in. I have yet to see in the past 20 yrs any "wild" burning bush's; see lots of sassafras that has like coloring-perhaps some have confused the 2 seeing them from a distance only.

  • Linda
    on Oct 30, 2013

    I never heard of the Burning Bush as being invasive. Never saw any seedlings growing in my gardens. I have 4 large bushes and love them. I live in South Jersey zone 7.

  • Angie W
    on Nov 2, 2013

    I'm actually getting ready to plant 2 in my yard....I love the color....: )..........I'm looking at the non-invasive type... http://www.houselogic.com/blog/plants-trees/non-invasive-burning-bush/#.

  • Douglas Hunt
    on Nov 2, 2013

    @Angie W, while the University of Connecticut is working on a sterile cultivar of burning bush, I do not believe one is ready for nursery production. And here's at least one author who thinks such efforts are misguided: http://nativeplantwildlifegarden.com/developing-sterile-invasives-why-bother/

  • Angie W
    on Nov 3, 2013

    Thank you Douglas....: )

Your comment...