Gardening/plant ID-help!

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q gardening plant id, gardening
  15 answers
  • Janet Pizaro Janet Pizaro on Feb 09, 2017
    It appear to be Wiegela
  • Lsb7228089 Lsb7228089 on Feb 09, 2017
    Loropetulum with its fringe like flowers. There are many varieties. Some have reddish leaves or even purple leaves.


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  • Michaela Strausberg Michaela Strausberg on Feb 09, 2017
    The reason the bricks or stones are coming a part is a poor foundation, beautiful idea but nothing is any better than its foundation

  • Margaret Powell Margaret Powell on Feb 09, 2017
    It looks like bamboo when it is young in the spring. The stems are hollow. I don't think it is Wiegela. Could it be Japanese Knotweed? From what I have red on that, it is invasive but this plant is at least ten years old and has not spread.
    • Allison Allison on Feb 10, 2017
      It is Japanese Knotweed. It does spread, but for me not aggressively. I have found some sprouting up in the woods near me, so have to wonder if that is from my plant. I really hate to pull it out. Mine is in a niche by my front porch and grows 12 feet tall.
  • Margaret Powell Margaret Powell on Feb 10, 2017
    thanks. I assume yours does bloom? I have it in three spots of my yard and the 1st spot where it was planted, has never bloomed nor spread after 20 years. (this one is shaded and dry). The second spot where I transplanted a small start never bloomed after 10 years. (this one is in full sun and dry) I transplanted a piece of it to another spot where it is much moister full sun and it bloomed after 2 years! Now the second transplant has started to bloom! Rather confusing.
  • Linda Hunt Linda Hunt on Feb 10, 2017
    Does anyone know if this would grown in zone 4A in northern Ontario, Canada? We go from hot as Hades in summer to hell does freeze over in the winter, LOL. I am
    • Julanne Sharrow Julanne Sharrow on Feb 16, 2017
      Japanese Knot weed will grow zone 3 on the north side of the house in the shade! It took 20 years to get rid of the bed, you have to just about screen the soil, or use Roundup. the stream beds in VT are rife since hurricane Irene changed the landscape.
  • Linda Hunt Linda Hunt on Feb 10, 2017
    Does anyone know if this would grown in zone 4A in northern Ontario, Canada? We go from hot as Hades in summer to hell does freeze over in the winter, LOL. I am looking for perennials that flower beautifully and shrubs and grasses that are interesting to leave for my heirs!!
    • Dee McGuire Dee McGuire on Feb 27, 2017
      Try Rosa Rugosa... it can get a bit wild if you don't trim it back every few years BUT the fragrance you get from them is fabulous! You can also try heirloom roses for that zone, because they are actually hardier than hybrid tea roses. False Indigo, Holly Hocks, Cosmos, Daisies, Black Eyed Suzannes, Echinacia, Butterfly Bush, Daffodils, Irises, Hostas, Ferns, Lilacs, Abelia (beauty bush), Flowering Almond... good luck finding that one, b/c I have not seen it in nurseries for over 20 years now, but it does look very romantic in the garden and has a sweet smell. That is a good start!!!
  • Margaret Powell Margaret Powell on Feb 10, 2017
    Mine has endured many cold winters and some near ninety weather and has not suffered for it. We are zone 6 here. I think it would be worth a try. Visit my facebook and message me with your address and I would be more that happy to send you starts this spring.
    • Ath9102554 Ath9102554 on Feb 14, 2017
      Would love a couple of starts too....am trying to start a landscape at a barren yard. who are you on Facebook? Lots of Margaret Powells
  • Micki Dmouse Micki Dmouse on Feb 11, 2017
    Great place for gardening info and questions.
  • LG LG on Feb 11, 2017
    Loropetulum
  • Margaret Powell Margaret Powell on Feb 11, 2017
    Here are pictures of my plant
  • Mst19564047 Mst19564047 on Feb 12, 2017
    This is not a loropetalum.
  • Becky Blackburn Becky Blackburn on Feb 12, 2017
    It is Lorapetalum!
  • Margaret Powell Margaret Powell on Feb 14, 2017

    maggie45036@gmail.com

    Just remember, under certain conditions, this can be invasive. However, my plants have not jumped out of their boundaries in 20 plus years.
  • Dee McGuire Dee McGuire on Feb 27, 2017
    looks like a spice bush... also looks like a honeysuckle hybrid!