Patricia
Patricia
  • Hometalker
  • Lebanon, OH

How to Repair Damaged Veneer Edging


I found this vintage pedestal table at a thrift store. There was significant damage to the scalloped veneer edging and even the cashier and the lady behind me in line thought it was hopeless. But they wished me luck all the same!
how to repair damaged veneer edging, concrete masonry, how to, woodworking projects
My "Plan A" was to repair the edging. My "Plan B" was a little vague, so luckily Plan A worked!
how to repair damaged veneer edging, concrete masonry, how to, woodworking projects
I used Band-it veneer edging for the repair. I also used painters tape, a pencil, scissors, and an iron wrapped in aluminum foil (not shown in this photo).

The new edging has a "right" and "wrong" side. The wrong side has adhesive which will eventually be activated with heat. I taped a strip of the edging with the wrong side out to an undamaged section. I traced the pattern onto the "right" side.
how to repair damaged veneer edging, concrete masonry, how to, woodworking projects
The new edging has a "right" and "wrong" side. The wrong side has adhesive which will eventually be activated with heat. I taped a strip of the edging with the wrong side out to an undamaged section.
how to repair damaged veneer edging, concrete masonry, how to, woodworking projects
I traced the pattern with a pencil onto the "right" side.
how to repair damaged veneer edging, concrete masonry, how to, woodworking projects
The new edging is easy to work with and doesn't require power tools. I used scissors to cut out the pattern.
how to repair damaged veneer edging, concrete masonry, how to, woodworking projects
Next I re-taped my pattern, but this time "right" side out. You'll notice in the photo that my new edging doesn't cover the entire section all the way to the bottom. I could have used wider edging, but I didn't have any on hand. Since I planned to paint this piece I used the product I had and later filled it in with wood filler.
how to repair damaged veneer edging, concrete masonry, how to, woodworking projects
I wrapped my iron in aluminum foil to protect it from getting scratched or potentially getting adhesive on it. Using the high heat setting, I gently rubbed it on to the new edging. The heat quickly activates the adhesive.
how to repair damaged veneer edging, concrete masonry, how to, woodworking projects
I allowed the re-activated adhesive to cool before removing the tape. I later filled in the gaps with stain-able wood filler. There were also some other small areas of damage that I filled in with wood filler. After the wood filler was dry I sanded it smooth.
how to repair damaged veneer edging, concrete masonry, how to, woodworking projects
I planned to paint and distress the table and wanted a consistent base color under the paint. So I applied a dark stain to the repaired area. If you were planning to refurbish a piece, you could match the stain and call it a day at this point.
how to repair damaged veneer edging, concrete masonry, how to, woodworking projects
And finally here is the finished piece! It's almost as good as new.
how to repair damaged veneer edging, concrete masonry, how to, woodworking projects
This photo shows the repaired damaged edge. It went through a lot of handling as I worked on painting it, distressing, waxing, etc., so I know it's good and sturdy.
how to repair damaged veneer edging, concrete masonry, how to, woodworking projects
To finish the table I used layers of chalk paint, wet distressing, stencils, dark wax, and gold highlights. I detailed these steps on my blog post, so if you're interested in learning how to create a similar look then I would love for you to stop by.
http://theblacksheepshoppe.blogspot.com/2017/02/vintage-pedestal-table.html

Suggested materials:

  • Band-it edging
  • Painters tape, pencil, scissors, iron, aluminum foil
  • Wood filler & stain

Top Hometalk Projects

30 Essential Hacks For Cleaning Around Your Home
15 Amazing Things You Can Make With Dollar Store Gems
31 Amazing Furniture Flips You Have to See to Believe
31 Amazing Furniture Flips You Have to See to Believe
30 Ways To Use Old Jeans For Brilliant Craft Ideas
30 Ways To Use Old Jeans For Brilliant Craft Ideas
The Easiest Ways to Grow a Bumper Crop of Tomatoes
29 Of The Best DIY Mirror Projects Ever Made
11 Unexpected Ways to Use Spices in Your Home
29 Of The Best DIY Mirror Projects Ever Made
31 Amazing Furniture Flips You Have to See to Believe
Craft Organization Ideas Mom Will Love
30 Essential Hacks For Cleaning Around Your Home
22 Ideas To Make Your Terra Cotta Pots Look Oh-So-Pretty
31 Coastal Decor Ideas Perfect For Your Home
Patricia

Want more details about this and other DIY projects? Check out my blog post!

Go

Have a question about this project?

3 of 19 questions
  • Deborah Biggers Thacker
    on May 13, 2019

    Not about this project. But any Help on damaged varnish?? Sand it down and revarnish? This is a piece in my living room my fatherinlaw made we call boheemeth. It is approx 5’ wide, 9’ tall. Shelving and cabinets. It’s huge. And my husband and kids have not been kind to it sitting drinks on it and whatever else they have in hand. I’d like to repair the bad spots on it.

    • Patricia
      on May 14, 2019

      Hi Deborah, Yes you could sand and revarnish the piece. However, I had a project that I used gel stain which was a lot easier which you can see the link to the project here. Another alternative to sanding is to remove the stain. I don't like chemical strippers, but there is a really good alternative called blue bear soy gel. If you try either method first try it on an inconspicuous spot to test the results. Good luck with boheemeth!

  • Pamela
    on May 21, 2019

    How to remove stretches from wooden dining table?

  • Barb
    on Jun 3, 2019

    I thought you were going to go through all your steps with your painting and stenciling. Did you somewhere? Your finished project is awesome!

Join the conversation

4 of 188 comments
Your comment...