Asked on Apr 28, 2017

Need help with suggestions on rebuilding a two-tiered wall

SueRymeaBeatrice Tangeman
+7

Answered

I've looked into several things to replace this to tear retaining wall the land slopes down so of course we get a lot of erosion I've been looking into the gabion systems but the boyfriend doesn't like the look of the wire I also have been considering free stacking large flagstone or oversize rocks that water could pass through any help would be appreciated
Blink of these two tears are 140 feet long and about 24 inches tall per each level any advice would be appreciated
10 answers
  • M. M..
    on Apr 28, 2017

    Are those railroad ties? Are they secured with pounded in metal stakes? I think stacked rock would be your best bet without re-cutting your terraces. The walls are constructed wider at the base and slightly tapered toward the top. Some stone walls are constructed with the larger rocks to the outside, almost like a hollow wall, then filled inside with with smaller rock, gravel, etc. If erosion w/ rain is a constant problem, then something like the metal rods inside the stacked rock walls will be needed to keep the rocks in place. Is your yard accessible to a small tractor, like a bobcat? Then you could place a few bigger rocks and fill in between with smaller. Are you planning to do this just for erosion, or will you plant/make paths on the levels? Good Luck!
  • Sue
    on Apr 28, 2017

    Thank you for the information yes they are in fact railroad ties that have rotted away the problem with this set up is the land that is behind us is a few acres that is just words and it constantly grows over the fence line however because the property sets up so high when it rains it wrote everything down into the yard it used to look very nice but has been neglected for a few years and I have been trying to figure out a system that would work I don't know that we could necessarily get a bobcat in the backyard there is also a an easement because of utilities up on the upper level there actually Flowering bushes and it one point about small garden and I would like to try and restore this we have dead trees to remove at the railroad ties are such an eyesore I've been trying to find something that's cost-effective to use because it is so long thank you for your response
  • Brian Rayl
    on Apr 29, 2017

    Improper installation is your problem. Properly installed retaining walls incorporate what is called a deadman. Which is basically a buried T-shape attached to the wall from behind. Google it.
  • Patty
    on Apr 29, 2017

    I think dry stacking flat rocks is gorgeous, but they should not be more that 3-4 feet tall when dry stacked and to sd it right you will need to dig a trench 6-12 inches deep. From looking at your pictures it will take a lot of rock to build your wall and you want to make sure you have good rocks. You can google dry stacking rocks.
  • Beatrice Tangeman
    on Apr 29, 2017

    Seems like you are getting some good advice here, your photo looks like our retaining tiers on our hillside. I would like to add the importance of allowing drainage. Do you know if Drain pipes were installed ? If not you want to be sure to install them or you will be replacing this wall sooner than later. Four retaining wall design basics are: base, backfill, drainage & height .
    Ps, even pre cut landscape timbers drilled and stacked and running rebar down them would be a low cost and effective replacement, since your layout is already there.
    Best of luck,
    bea
  • Sue
    on Apr 29, 2017

    Thank you yes I have looked into that as well with the ground eroding from the top and running down onto our property that makes it a little difficult and I'm also looking for something that is cost-effective as well thank you for your suggestion
  • Sue
    on Apr 29, 2017

    Thank you for the response some things to contemplate
  • Sue
    on Apr 29, 2017

    At this point since it's an issue of the wood rotting and drainage I think I would be more likely to work with some kind of a stone at least that doesn't rot
  • Rymea
    on May 2, 2017

    Have you thought of not replacing it and just having a slope? You could put a drainage system at the bottom of the hill.
  • Sue
    on May 2, 2017

    replacing the railroad Ties ? If so yes but the eroding soil from above property still rushes down due to the grade
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