Asked on May 1, 2017

How to get rid of the big black bumble bees?

SandyG13526476512181
+3

Answered

I'm told they don't sting but my great-grandsons are afraid to go out in the yard
6 answers
  • Sharon Susa Courchesne
    on May 1, 2017

    Bumble bees nest in the group so clean up yard of unwanted mulch or other such organic debris. When working in flower beds, gardens, etc. or when cleaning up other such areas around the home, be cautious when dealing with any flat board, stone, bricks, etc. as these are the most likely sites for a nest.

    Remove flat items that could provide a nesting site for bees: boards, plywood, other loose building materials, tarps or other junk. (This will not only reduce the chances of bumble bees nesting too close to house, children or pets but will also make your garden look nicer.)

    Flat rocks, stones or bricks should be removed unless they are part of a pathway or other decoration. Examine the ground beneath stones or brick for possible mouse holes which need to be filled in. Check these items to make sure that they are packed down to make good contact with the ground.

    If you find a nest, it is best to leave it alone and let the drones and workers die off during the winter. Use this option only when you are positive that children, pets or workers in the area are not at risk of being stung by the bees.

    Foraging bees are extremely beneficial and want nothing to do with people or pets; encounters with bees in and around their nest can be harmful to people and pets. Good luck!

    Oh, and yes, they do sting.

    DO BUMBLE BEES STING?
    Yes. The worker bees and queen bee in a bumble bee colony are capable of stinging. Bumble bee colonies are organized around a queen bee, who can also sting, drones (male bees) and worker bees. Worker bees are sterile females, and are able to sting because the ovipositor has evolved into a stinger. A queen bee generally only uses her stinger to defend against rival queens.
    WHAT HAPPENS WHEN A BUMBLE BEE STINGS?
    Unlike the honey bee, a bumble bee’s stinger has no barbs. Because it is a smooth weapon, it can be used multiple times. This means that an angry bumble bee can potentially cause more harm than a honey bee because it is able to continue to sting. It is also possible for the stinger to break off, but this does not always result in bee death.
    WHEN WILL A BUMBLE BEE STING?
    Bumble bees are not as defensive as honey bees, and must be provoked before they will attack. Attacks typically occur near the hive, as the bee will defend the hive and its stores of pollen. If a bumble bee is buzzing near you, it may be a male carpenter bee or a worker bee attracted to something sugary. Covering sugary substances to prevent the bee from sensing or accessing them, and moving away from the bee itself are often enough to prevent a bee sting.




  • Susan Axsom Curtis
    on May 1, 2017

    with out the bees you will not have such a pretty garden. if you have vegetables and/or fruits you will have a lot less to harvest as the bee are the ones that do the most pollinating. I have to hand pollinate my garden due to a lack of bees.
  • Laura
    on May 2, 2017

    They like flowers and catnip, so if our have these move them to another area where the kids won't play. This world is shared so we need to leave them a place.
  • 512181
    on May 4, 2017

    Make sure those big bumble bees are not carpenter bees. They are active in the spring and they love to drill holes in wood and then tunnel in to lay eggs. They are a very big nuisance. If you see piles of saw dust or drippy white stuff on windows, and of course perfectly drilled holes, you may have the bees.
  • 13526476
    on May 5, 2017

    As Lynda described, carpenter bees are very different than bumblebees but both are still not agressive. Because we have had such honeybee die-off, we encourage all the bees we can, from bumblebee and mason bee houses, bee-loving flowers, shrubs and nectar sponges. This is such a sharing/learning experience so that our children understand we benefit from these little powerhouses, and it's up to us to support their life cycle as they do ours


  • SandyG
    on May 5, 2017

    We call them carpenter bees and they can make a mess boring into wood. To stop from boring the same hole, we fill holes, as soon as we find them with caulking and they won't go back into the hole. Yes, they are a nuisance and I am sure they can be frightening to a child or adult. Learn to identify them and help to reassure them they won't sting. It can be hard to do with younger children especially when the word "bee" means possibly being stung.
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