What's the best way to paint a "distressed" look on wood?

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I've seen many different techniques so now I'm very confused!
  4 answers
  • Dysko7710 Dysko7710 on May 26, 2017
    Two best techniques I think are to paint, let dry and then sand in areas where you want the 'distressed' look, or you can wipe vaseline on the areas you want distressed before painting, then paint, painting right over the vaseline, then when the paint dries, wipe the vaseline off and it will take the paint with it and make it look distressed. Here is a link that shows many different ways to do it, and you can choose what is best or easiest for you:
    http://www.hometalk.com/27862298/s-15-easy-tricks-to-give-your-furniture-that-gorgeous-distressed-look?page_num=3
  • Thank you!
    Any particular type of paint?
  • Patricia Patricia on May 28, 2017
    I love the way Chalk Paint distresses. You can use 220-grit sandpaper around the edges for a subtle look. Apply more pressure as you go if you want a more distressed look. If you're nervous to begin on a big project then hit the thrift store and look for something small to test it out. Good luck and have fun!
  • Sharon Sharon on Jun 04, 2017
    Nothing like distressing a piece of furniture to get the distressed look. Antique shops use ice picks, pieces of chain, hammers, nails, horse shoe nails, sand paper and steel wool to distress a piece. The most valued technique is to create wormholes and tracks. Practice on a piece of scrap wood to see what you like. Think of the areas that get the most use around the drawer pulls and edges where wear occurs. I usually put an undercoat/stain on a piece first, so when you distress it a bit of contrasting color shows.
    I think one of the best pieces I did was a sideboard where I wanted the piece to look like zebrawood pickled. So I stripped it, and then painted it with milk paint, and then used some nylon netting to delicately create the striped pattern of zebrawood in a diagonal herringbone pattern on the doors. I have since used nylon netting where I want to remove some of the paint to give the piece a striated look. Allow the paint to set up a bit before you start removing some.