How can I rid my asparagus patch from quack grass?

+2
Answered
  5 answers
  • Donna Keske-Howard Donna Keske-Howard on Jun 11, 2017
    As with any invasive weed, the best way to control quackgrass is to make sure that you do not have it in the first place. Any plants that you bring home from stores or nurseries must be carefully checked for quackgrass and remove the quackgrass plant and roots completely if you find it in the pot.

    Another essential part of getting rid of quackgrass is to act quickly when you do find it in your garden. Quackgrass moves quickly through any soil, but moves like lightening through loamy or sandy soil. Check your beds often for the appearance of this weed. If quackgrass is found, remove the quackgrass plant and roots as best as possible. Any roots left in the ground will grow new plants. Check the area daily for any new growth and remove any new quackgrass found as soon as possible.

    If your flower beds have become overrun with quackgrass, manual pulling is really your only option for getting rid of quackgrass. Unfortunately, killing quackgrass is not as easy as simply spraying an herbicide. They do not respond to selective weed killers and your only chemical option for eliminating quackgrass is to use a non-selective weed killer. These weed killers will get rid of the quackgrass, but will also kill any plants the quack grass is growing near.

    If a bed becomes badly infested with quackgrass, you may need to replant the bed.
    • Start by removing any plants you wish to keep.
    • Check the soil carefully for any traces of quackgrass roots and remove if found.
    • Next, you will be killing the quackgrass in the bed. Treat the bed with a non-selective weed killer, like Round-up or boiling water. Wait one week and treat the bed again.
    Wait one more week, and if quackgrass is starting to grow again, repeat the above steps again.

    While this may seem a bit extreme in order to control quackgrass, this is the only way to ensure that you have eliminated this stubborn weed.
  • Donna Keske-Howard Donna Keske-Howard on Jun 11, 2017
    As with any invasive weed, the best way to control quackgrass is to make sure that you do not have it in the first place. Any plants that you bring home from stores or nurseries must be carefully checked for quackgrass and remove the quackgrass plant and roots completely if you find it in the pot.
    Another essential part of getting rid of quackgrass is to act quickly when you do find it in your garden. Quackgrass moves quickly through any soil, but moves like lightening through loamy or sandy soil. Check your beds often for the appearance of this weed. If quackgrass is found, remove the quackgrass plant and roots as best as possible. Any roots left in the ground will grow new plants. Check the area daily for any new growth and remove any new quackgrass found as soon as possible.
    If your flower beds have become overrun with quackgrass, manual pulling is really your only option for getting rid of quackgrass. Unfortunately, killing quackgrass is not as easy as simply spraying an herbicide. They do not respond to selective weed killers and your only chemical option for eliminating quackgrass is to use a non-selective weed killer. These weed killers will get rid of the quackgrass, but will also kill any plants the quack grass is growing near.
    If a bed becomes badly infested with quackgrass, you may need to replant the bed.
    • Start by removing any plants you wish to keep.
    • Check the soil carefully for any traces of quackgrass roots and remove if found.
    • Next, you will be killing the quackgrass in the bed. Treat the bed with a non-selective weed killer, like Round-up or boiling water. Wait one week and treat the bed again.
    Wait one more week, and if quackgrass is starting to grow again, repeat the above steps again.
    While this may seem a bit extreme in order to control quackgrass, this is the only way to ensure that you have eliminated this stubborn weed.
  • W.r.w. W.r.w. on Jun 11, 2017
    A friend of mine had a small patch of prickly pear in his yard that was part of his landscape. It was full of weeds that he wanted to get rid of. He erected a small temporary fence around it and threw some ducks in for a few days. They ate every bit of the weeds but of course they didn't care for the prickly pear. Problem solved. Of course if ducks like asparagus, this idea wouldn't work for you.
  • Sue Harder Sue Harder on Jun 11, 2017
    Grass Beater will kill quack grass (and other grasses) and will not harm plants.
  • Joanne Waylett Joanne Waylett on Jun 11, 2017
    most weeds and weed like growths are best controlled by using a weed puller or trowel and digging them out
Your comment...