GREAT SELF-SEEDING PLANTS


If your vision for your garden is adaptable and you take delight in little surprises, then you may be interested in inviting self-seeding volunteers into your garden.
To see more gardening posts: http://threedogsinagarden.blogspot.ca/
Hollyhocks a biennial plant that reseeds itself after it flowers and then blooms the following summer. (Full sun)
Hollyhocks a biennial plant that reseeds itself after it flowers and then blooms the following summer. (Full sun)
Forget-me-nots are probably the most familiar garden self-seeders. They look wonderful as an understory for tulips and early spring bloomers. (Sun or part shade)
Forget-me-nots are probably the most familiar garden self-seeders. They look wonderful as an understory for tulips and early spring bloomers. (Sun or part shade)
There are large sections of my garden under the cover of mature trees, and so I welcome anything that can take the shade. Resilient little troopers, Violets have now self-seeded into both sunny and shaded crevices throughout my garden.
There are large sections of my garden under the cover of mature trees, and so I welcome anything that can take the shade. Resilient little troopers, Violets have now self-seeded into both sunny and shaded crevices throughout my garden.
Undemanding of anything but a sunny spot, it shows up every summer to add a punch of bright color to my July garden and keeps blooming until late fall.
Undemanding of anything but a sunny spot, it shows up every summer to add a punch of bright color to my July garden and keeps blooming until late fall.
Annual Calendula (Full sun)
Annual Calendula (Full sun)
Like Calendula, Feverfew is a happy-go-lucky flower that shows up in the oddest nooks and crannies. I welcome it wherever it turns up. (Full sun)
Like Calendula, Feverfew is a happy-go-lucky flower that shows up in the oddest nooks and crannies. I welcome it wherever it turns up. (Full sun)
Annual poppies love sun. They are such great self-seeders that can easily take over a flower bed if you let them!
Annual poppies love sun. They are such great self-seeders that can easily take over a flower bed if you let them!
Columbines are early bloomers that are great for bridging the gap between spring bulbs and the great majority of perennials. They also readily self-seed. (Full sun)
Columbines are early bloomers that are great for bridging the gap between spring bulbs and the great majority of perennials. They also readily self-seed. (Full sun)
Columbine
Columbine
Columbine
Columbine
Foxgloves are another biennial that often reseed themselves and then bloom late the following spring. (Part shade)
Foxgloves are another biennial that often reseed themselves and then bloom late the following spring. (Part shade)
Yellow Fumitory is another shade loving self-seeder. I love the fern-like leaves and it blooms non-stop all summer. It can spread readily, but any unwanted seedlings are easy to pull out.
Yellow Fumitory is another shade loving self-seeder. I love the fern-like leaves and it blooms non-stop all summer. It can spread readily, but any unwanted seedlings are easy to pull out.

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Three Dogs in a Garden

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3 of 9 comments
  • Carole Alden
    on Mar 3, 2014

    Three Dogs in a GardenYes, this has creeping roots. It's over at my other house were my daughter lives now. I'm at my son's house and my other daughter has moved out here too. It's the farm my aunt had years ago and there isn't a flower anyplace, except for some very old hostas, so I'll be moving some of mine over here. I'll first have to find out what they are, so I can check about if the horses might eight some. The soil is awful, gravel pit a couple streets over. lots of sand too. We do have free horse manure. I'm 66 so I won't be doing a lot of digging in this hard soil, but I'll build some compost and see if I can build up a berm someplace. I love waking up in the morning to see the flowers outside. Lots of land, so it won't matter if they get out of hand to much, everything is green around here, need some color badly.I have sun places and shade. Your Hollyhocks are wonderful.

    • Three Dogs in a Garden
      on Mar 4, 2014

      @Carole Alden Hi Carol, I am pretty sure I know this daisy, but couldn't find the name for it when I wrote my original reply. Around here it is a plant that you tend to find on older properties and farms. It works well in certain situations and is great for color mid-summer.

  • Carole Alden
    on Mar 4, 2014

    Three Dogs in a Garden Thanks, their free, so I'll just move a pail of them over here and plant where we don't keep any horses and find out what they are after they bloom. I do remember they were straight and tall, besides spreading a lot. You can't keep them in a flower bed, they spread. They do look nice behind tiger lilies.

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