What foods have saturated fats?

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  • KattywhampusLOL KattywhampusLOL on Sep 26, 2017
    Good Morning Lois Ernst, The quick and easy way to remember which foods have saturated fats in them is just remember "if it tastes good, it's probably not good for you" LOL! In all honesty, that is how I remember to be careful with what I eat (I am severely limited to the types of food I can consume, and I must admit I do cheat,but I pay the price for it, too). Below are weblinks that I know will help you somewhat, but the list of foods containg sat-fat is huge; easier to remember Dairy, Meats, and Lard. Thanks for asking Hometalk for answers about which foods have Sat-fats :)

  • Dianacirce70 Dianacirce70 on Sep 26, 2017
    Saturated fats are in the processed oils, if it says hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated it is a saturated fat. Most foods today have saturated fats, its just cheaper to produce. Read your labels, know your terms, that will help you figure out what. Also know that unsaturated fats are better for you than saturated fats. Just imagine it like a glue, saturated fats are more glue-like and don't absorb or break down as well, leading to a buildup of fat in the body. Also know that your body needs a healthy amount of fat to function properly, so cutting saturated fats, rather than all fats, is the best way to go for health purposes.

  • Ssn22254422 Ssn22254422 on Sep 27, 2017
    Trans fats such as hydrogenated oils are definitely not healthy. Natural fats such as grass-fed butter and organic coconut oil are very good for brain health





  • Rhonda S Rhonda S on Sep 27, 2017
    Basically, if it is solid at room temperature, it is saturated fat. Animal fat like lard, bacon grease, tallow from steaks, etc., are almost certainly sources. Real butter is high in saturated fat. Oils that stay liquid, like olive oil or vegetable oil, have other, non-saturated fats. We read labels like maniacs, as well. Some refried beans are made with lard, so we try either to make our own or to use a low-fat version. We don't substitute non-fat cheese for the real thing, but we do use less cheese than we used to. We eat a ton of veggies now, and are healthier for it. Once in a while, though, we indulge in a good steak or some eggplant parmigiana. Best wishes. Added in edit - you didn't ask about transfats, so I didn't mention it. Another poster does so I'll add a bit. About all the research says transfats are bad for you. They are not "saturated fat" in the sense of animal fats, but rather modified fats that have been treated to be more stable without refrigeration. Those little rat hide in MANY products. As another points out "hydrogenated" or "partially hydrogenated" in the ingredients list is a bad sign. Powdered coffee creamer, some margarines, and almost any sort of store bought sweet (cookies, Twinkies, Little Debbie snacks) are culprits as well. The hydrogenation process makes the stuff have a longer unrefrigerated shelf life, so if you are trying to cut transfats (and we all should) you may have to give up on some ready-made treats.

  • Kay Kay on Sep 27, 2017
    I Use Extra Virgin olive oil when cooking. It is very good for the hart, plus you don't need to use a lot. My brother is in the olive oil business. I get my oil from him so I know it is good quality. Increasing Omega 3 is good to, as it helps to lower bad cholesterol. You can allso do this by using plant steroids found in food. I use a special margarine and cereal containig these steroids. It is best to have foods rich in Omega 3 at least three times a week. Sardines are a good sauce of this, plus there is less mercury in sardines. The best way I found, was to lower the overall amount of saturated fat I consumed replacing them with more healthy fats, now I am making lots of good cholesterol, but even so, you still need to watch the amount of satuated fats consumed. Tip. Be aware of comsuming to much food containing carbohydrates, as they brake down and convert to blood sugar, only have a small serve of these foods. I have problems with high cholesterol (bad cholesterol) so I have had to learn the ropes. Hope this helps. Kay Adelaide Australia

  • Barbara Baldwin Barbara Baldwin on Sep 27, 2017
    Tasty ones...alas..

  • Kmd.bush Kmd.bush on Sep 27, 2017
    DIY?