Deanna
Deanna
  • Hometalk Helper
  • Lombard, IL
Asked on Oct 2, 2017

Hibiscus questions

Ann HalsingDeannaOrville Wiebers
+18

Answered

My Father just recently passed away and he had two beautiful red hibiscus plants
next to their front door. The plant is over 6 feet tall.
I would love to have his hibiscus come up every year at my house.
I took a cutting of the plant about 2 feet long with a few flower buds.
I placed it in a large vase with cold water and it recovered right away.
One of the unopened flower buds even opened.
My question is should I cut more of the branches and stem off and replant those too>
Should I leave it in the water until it roots or should I just plant it in the ground
with some rooting hormone?
Also once it's growing outside will I need to cut it down each winter?

q hibiscus questions
13 answers
  • Nancy Turner
    on Oct 2, 2017

    You need to find out if it is a perennial hibiscus in the northern regions. I don't think it is because it was so tall and from what I have heard the perennial ones are only a couple of feet high. If you plant it in the ground it will probably not recover from the winter. They are perennial in Florida, but not in IL. I myself got five pots this year, and will be bringing them in yet this fall.
  • Deanna
    on Oct 2, 2017

    Thanks Nancy, I wish he were here to ask if he brought them in for the winter. Maybe I should just leave it inside and plant it in the spring.
  • Ann Halsing
    on Oct 2, 2017

    Don't do anything to the plant until the stalks die down, the just cut them back but leave some of the stalk , cover with leaves or mulch for the winter. in the spring when it warms up brush away the leaves & wait for the sun to do its job. I have done this every year & even transplanted some & they are doing great. hope this helps. Ann
    • Deanna
      on Oct 3, 2017

      Thanks Ann, my question now is should I keep the stems in water
      until they show roots or should I just plant the stems in the dirt now?
  • Gpa5514109
    on Oct 3, 2017

    Hi Deanna, I live in Australia and I stuck my cuttings in pots. They do take a while to grow in pots. The two I have in the grown are doing well come winter or summer. They do need trimming as they say the flowers come on the new growth. They do like the sun.
    • Deanna
      on Oct 3, 2017

      Thanks Gpando I'm going to try and root them in water for one week
      then I'll transplant them outdoors . I think they need to chill over the
      winter here in Chicago.
  • Cori Widen
    on Oct 3, 2017

    Sun and trimming will help a lot! Good luck, and so sorry for your loss.
  • Karen George
    on Oct 3, 2017

    I am not sure about rooting this but to me it looks like a rose mallow which is a type of hibiscus. Look it up and if it is it is a perennial. I live in Maine and they do great here. I found this web page in case it is a rose mallow it tells how to propagate a rose mallow

  • C
    on Oct 3, 2017

    Can't help you with the cuttings, but I planted this Hibiscus 2 years ago. It is called a "Hardy Hibiscus". They come in White, Pink and Red. They grow in the midwest including Michigan (winters well below freezing) and Pennsylvania. This one is in Pennsylvania.
  • Yya23185546
    on Oct 3, 2017

    If your hibiscus's leaves are shinning, then you need to bring indoor for winter, put at sunny spot of the room. If leaves not shinning, then, it is perineal, you can plant to ground spring time to sunny spot. Freeze temp will kill root in the pot. Perineal cutting can root in the water, wait until root come out then you can plant in the garden spring time. Plant deep until leave come out, make sure stay moist after you plant on the ground.
  • Ann Halsing
    on Oct 3, 2017

    I would plant them now, But keep them watered, what state are you living in?
    • Deanna
      on Oct 13, 2017

      Thanks Ann, I live in a suburb 30 miles west of downtown Chicago.
  • Mickey
    on Oct 3, 2017

    Deanna,
    I live about 3 hours northwest of you in Iowa. I had 2 larger potted hibiscus trees for years. Every year I would take them in before the hard frost. I put mine in the storage area of the basement and watered them once a month. Once the weather reached 60 degrees I would put them back outside again. Once outside, many of the leaves would change color and fall off. Within a couple of weeks all the leaves would grow in and be as full and beautiful as ever. I highly recommend you bring them in as your winters along the lake can be a bit more brutal than ours. If you want expert advice you can always visit a local greenhouse.
    Sorry for your loss and best of luck with the Hibiscus!



    • Deanna
      on Oct 13, 2017

      Thanks Hillary!
      I was out at my Father's house last weekend and I took a look at his hibiscus plants and it seems he just cut them down to the ground each winter, there are some really big woody stems from previous years.
  • Orville Wiebers
    on Oct 10, 2017

    When I bought my hibiscus the tag said good outside to 40 degrees. I planted them in pots without drain holes and bring them in each winter and take them out in the spring after danger of frost is gone. I do trim them back when I bring them in but they will do well and bloom most of the winter in a sunny spot watered well once a week with a little fertilizer. One is now 5 years old and the other 6. We live in South Dakota.
  • Deanna
    on Oct 13, 2017

    Thanks Orville, I'm pretty convinced he left them in the ground,
    they do come up every summer.
    I'll be taking a few more cuttings next time out there.
  • Ann Halsing
    on Oct 13, 2017

    Good Luck Ann
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