PruBelle
PruBelle
  • Hometalker
  • Duluth, GA
Asked on Oct 2, 2017

How can I salvage 2 Camillia bushes during deck expansion?

PruBelleCindyKba28478716
+15

Answered

I am having my deck rebuilt in 10 days and these two camellia bushes are in the way. They are going to chainsaw both straight across. I want to salvage them.

I planted them over 20 years ago. Now they are very tall, probably 10 feet tall. I don't know how each big root ball is.

Is there ANYTHING I can do to move these two large bushes to another location in just 10 days?
q how can i salvage 2 camillia bushes during deck expansion
q how can i salvage 2 camillia bushes during deck expansion
q how can i salvage 2 camillia bushes during deck expansion
10 answers
  • Cheryl A
    on Oct 2, 2017

    can you cut them back or will you need to move them? go to walterreeves.com he is a gardening guru

    • PruBelle
      on Oct 2, 2017

      Hey Cheryl! I'm close to you! I went to the Duluth Fall Festival this weekend to find Walter Reeves, he was supposed to be in the Man Cave around noon. He never showed up when the poster time said. I was going to ask him.

      I do need to move the bushes because I am expanding deck size by 2 feet, straight over the bush location. I probably will have to cut them back prior to trying to relocate. They have buds right now, has not bloomed. Makes me sad.
  • Cynthia H
    on Oct 2, 2017

    I would cut them back to a manageable size and dig up the root ball. You may not get flowers next year, but, it's worth the work to save them.
    • PruBelle
      on Oct 2, 2017

      It's definitely worth a try. A chainsaw straight across is definitely death.
  • Dig them out, or have someone dig out for you. Have their new holes prepared in advance. All a local gardener, they will probably dig holes and move for you for a small sum.
    • PruBelle
      on Oct 2, 2017

      I was going to attempt myself, but may end up hiring someone. Might need a pro.
  • Oberlinmom
    on Oct 2, 2017

    I would cut them down making sure to leave as much greenery as possible. Then dig up the root ball. Have a new spot ready and replant right away. Make sure you water it in well and continue to keep it moist until it seems established. You might even look up how to cultivate the plant. It maybe something you can grow cuttings from and it will insure some of the plant survives.
  • Nancy Turner
    on Oct 2, 2017

    Will the same spot be available to replant them once the deck is finished? Get a garbage can big enough to hold all the roots, plenty of potting soil and plant it in that until the spot is available and replant it. While you are at it, maybe expand the hole a bit and put in a mixture of its original soil and the potting soil to give it a fresh start in its old home. Make sure you put drainage holes in it so the roots don't drown. Next year you can use the can to grow potatoes or tomatoes or something.
    • Nancy Turner
      on Oct 3, 2017

      Until you get the new spot, which would be nice by the new deck, it should stay healthy in the trash can in the mean time because it will have plenty of soil to spread its roots. Have fun with your new deck when it is done, and hopefully your Camilla bushes will have the position of prominence that they deserve, they are gorgeous!
  • Janet Pizaro
    on Oct 2, 2017

    Do not cut them back,that adds more stress when transplanting.They appear to be very large with a very large root system.I would recommend a professional for this one
  • Kba28478716
    on Oct 2, 2017

    camellias are not too deeply rooted, generally but it does depend on how big your plant is and how old. The roots though do not spread too far. I have moved big ones without any difficulty...make sure you dig as large a rootball as possible.
    Camelias like a slightly acid soil but will tolerate some lime, a little, so neutral soil is fine. Mine are in neutral ground and do well and they are in full sun, well, from late morning to late afternoon and they flower well. Early morning sun is a big NO not because the shrubs themselves are damaged but the buds and flowers suffer if frosted and thaw takes place too quickly. Ideally dappled shade if possible. but they can grow in sunny or shady situations. However, they are tough things. When I plant camelias I do so at soil level, not too deep, and incorporate ericaceous compost mixed with my own soil and my own compost, water very, very well and then mulch with bark chips or compost. I find white flowering varieties need more protection from the sun and mine is tucked away in a very sheltered position. http://www.gardenersworld.com/forum/problem-solving/moving-a-camellia-plant/75539.html
    • PruBelle
      on Oct 2, 2017

      Great info! Thank you so much. One is white and one is pink. I'm going to incorporate everyone's advice. Heck, maybe I should take pictures, if I am successful, I can post it!
  • PruBelle
    on Oct 3, 2017

    So, I have delayed the deck expansion until I can resolve the bush issue. I have more than 10 days. Maybe they'll bloom before I move them.
  • Cindy
    on Oct 3, 2017

    I would definitely call a pro for this job. Those bushes are too big to dig out with a shovel. And please don't cut on them before the relocation. That's too much stress on the plants. Wishing you well.
  • PruBelle
    on Oct 22, 2017

    Update on the Camillia bushes, which are currently covered up with new buds!! YAY.
    My deck builder knows how important they are to me and we are designing the deck to avoid damage. We're extending in a different direction and stop short of the bushes.
    We are demolishing the deck today/tomorrow. Rain expected. Then we will start the new deck as soon as rain ends. I'm so thrilled. I will post photos when we are finished. Thank you everyone for all your help and tips.
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