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Alicia W
Alicia W
  • Hometalker
  • Middletown, PA

How an Old Window Helped Organize A Mess

7 Materials
$5
2 Hours
Easy

Everyone has a landing place were things get dropped. It could be a desk, a place in your hallway or a dining room table.
I have a table in my basement gardening space. I had to get this organized!
how an old window helped organize this mess
how an old window helped organize this mess
I had this window in my basement.
I decided to add four pockets made from chicken wire and two shelves made from scrap wood. (The pockets and shelves are drawn in pink on this picture)
how an old window helped organize this mess
Carefully remove any glass panes that remain in the wooden window.
how an old window helped organize this mess
Measure the wooden pane to determine the how much chicken wire is needed for each pocket and the length of each shelf. Add two inches to your measurement for the pockets.
how an old window helped organize this mess
Measure the chicken wire and cut to size.
how an old window helped organize this mess
Lay the chicken wire inside the wooden the frame. Staple the bottom of the chicken wire to the bottom of the wooden frame.
how an old window helped organize this mess
Turn the window over.
Form a pocket with the chicken wire, shaping the wire so the bottom stands out from the frame.
Staple the sides of the chicken wire to the sides of the wooden frame.
how an old window helped organize this mess
Measure and cut scrap wood to make a shelf.
Place the wood inside the window pane, aligning it to the back of the window.
Screw the shelf in place.
how an old window helped organize this mess
To make the backing for the window, begin by measuring the entire window.
how an old window helped organize this mess
Place those measurements on a piece of 1/8" plywood and cut to fit.
how an old window helped organize this mess
Sand the edges of the plywood and paint the color of your choice.
I painted mine with chalkboard paint so I could label my pockets and shelves.
Allow to dry.
how an old window helped organize this mess
Place the backing onto the window, painted side down.
Using a brad nailer or stapler, attach the backing to the window around the edges and up the middle.
how an old window helped organize this mess
My table is now organized and everything has a place.
Spray paint unused water bottles white to store string, soft wire, and wire ties. Use mason jars to store seeds, cutting the label from the seed packet and placing it inside the jar.

How is this attached to the wall? I have a ledge along the outer wall of my basement. I attached a 1" x 6" to the top of the window and "hung" the window from the ledge. There is no worry of falling as the ledge is 6" deep.

To attach to a wall, simply screw the window to your wall using anchors.

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Have a question about this project?

3 of 7 questions
  • Kelly Byrd
    on Jan 20, 2018

    I like this idea for above desk area where I have so much clutter. What can I use instead of chicken wire?

    • Michelle Frost
      on Jun 24, 2018

      Wanting to make this for our pole barn. I think using the wire or the onion bag mash would work best since we have so many Stink Bugs that like to hide. I’d be able to keep it cleaned out often. Thanks for your brilliant ideas!

  • Brenda Long Self
    on Apr 10, 2018

    I don’t think the plywood is 12 inches by 12 inches as stated in the supply list. I guess it doesn’t matter as you would make it the size of one’s window and that is going to vary.

    i haven’t figured out the pockets yet unless you cut the wire where you want the pockets???

    • Alicia W
      on Apr 12, 2018

      Hi Brenda. Sandra and Shirley are correct. I just cut the chicken wire a little larger to make the pockets.

  • Just curious, did you check the window for lead paint? I bought 5 gorgeous antique windows, my husband thought to test them for lead paint. They were positive. I couldn't leave them the way they were : (. I didn't want flaky lead paint in my house, not at all.


    I had to scrape as much of the old paint off as I could in my garage, then repaint the windows to seal in the rest of the paint. I've only done 2, I need my hubby to hang them up. Not as much character as I wished, but still cute.


    Protect yourself if you're going to scrape off lead paint. Here's me about to go to work, lol. Wear old clothes you are ok with throwing away. Take a shower as soon as you finish. Definately wear eye protection and a respirator.


    Ssorry for the long post. Everytime I see a post with an antique window in it I cringe, wondering if they brought lovely distressed lead paint into their homes : (.

    • Birdy Daniel
      on Sep 15, 2018

      My pleasure! We do want to be safe around children and pets, and don’t want to breathe in hazardous waste ourselves, but we walk among leadbased painted walls every time we visit old historic buildings, and no one seems to panic. That’s because the lead is undisturbed or turned into powder that can be ingested.

      if you need to scrape it, wear a paint suit, mask, goggles, and gloves, and keep your hands wet. Don’t touch your face. When you are finished, wash your face and change your clothes. Don’t let any powder stay on your skin or in your hair. Rinse the surface and let dry before clear coating.

      Better yet, Leave it alone and it’s not harmful. Paint over it with clear coat or even another paint. Just don’t try to remove it without proper masking and protection.

Join the conversation

68 of 73 comments
  • Carolina
    on Jun 22, 2018

    Very cool and original!!

  • Birdy Daniel
    on Aug 7, 2018

    This is a really cute idea. I store my yard and garden supplies differently, (I have much more to store!), but I can see this used for many other things. It’s a keeper!

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