Margaret
Margaret
  • Hometalker
  • Canada
Asked on Oct 5, 2017

When to say goodbye to annuals and vegetable gardens

Nancy TurnerCindyCatherine Anspaugh
+4

Answered

7 answers
  • Ken
    on Oct 5, 2017

    When they are done doing the job. It's just that easy. Perennials are different because after blooming they need to build a store for next year's bloom. No such consideration for annual plants.
  • Elaine
    on Oct 5, 2017

    It really depends on where you live and depends on their appearance. If your annuals are still flowering and looking good (not brown and dying), then leave them a bit longer if you are happy. Usually by October or mid October, I’m tiring of the annuals (such as Petunias, Geraniums) and wanting a change in the garden so I pull them out and plant various colored Mums, etc. I find most of the Annuals are looking spindly and “leggy” so they are replaced with Fall Mums, etc. My Echinacea (Cone Flowers) are usually still looking good so I leave them and I leave my decorative grasses in the beds all Winter as they look beautiful with a dusting of snow on them. Re the vegetables, again, it depends on where you live.
  • TAMMY SPALSBURY
    on Oct 5, 2017

    Now would be a very good time.
  • Darryl J. Gary
    on Oct 5, 2017

    When you are tried of garden
  • Catherine Anspaugh
    on Oct 5, 2017

    They will let you know all by themselves. They won't usually survive the first frost.
  • Cindy
    on Oct 5, 2017

    Your plants will let you know when it's time to pull them. When they start to dry up and fall, it's time.
  • Nancy Turner
    on Oct 5, 2017

    In the veggie garden I remove the plants as they are done producing. As of now, I have only removed my corn and bush beans as they were done producing and drying up. My winter squash, tomatoes, peppers and cucumbers are still going strong and even producing flowers and new fruit, so I will leave them until they die down with frost. The first few frosts I cover what I can as they usually are only for a few hours a night with warm days and nights between and that allows more to ripen before they die off.
Your comment...