Asked on Oct 16, 2017

What kind of plant is this leaf from?

Daw22006084Ani13089233Tar3839281
+37

Answered

There is a large "bush" of it at our new house. Does it bloom? Can it be sprouted in a container of water? Hoping some terrific gardener in the community can help. Thanks in advance!
q what kind of plant is this leaf from
Leaf has bright yellow spots as tho it has been spatter painted.
38 answers
  • Bee
    on Oct 16, 2017

    looks like a croton leaf...in the sun they turn beautiful colors{if planted there}
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  • Susan Findlay
    on Oct 16, 2017

    I believe that is a Gold Dust Diffenbacia (sp)
  • Janet Pizaro
    on Oct 16, 2017

    This is Acuba typically a tropical shrub.t does not bear any glowers and the leaves themselves will not make in water
  • Lori
    on Oct 16, 2017

    Looks like a Croton leaf. No blooms, grows in warm states outside easily. Look up the different varieties as it is so easy to keep. Cold states it will be fine outside til 40 degrees.
  • Hb
    on Oct 16, 2017

    Your leaf looks like a Gold Dust Croton . I would have to assume you are in the USDA Hardiness Zone 9 - 15to be able to grown this
  • Michele Pappagallo
    on Oct 16, 2017

    I am pretty sure that is a Gold Dust plant. There is a fancy latin name for it as well, but I can't remember what it is. I would think you could sprout it in water.....do some research on Gold Dust plants and see if you can find more info. Hope that helps a bit. :)
  • Clb7957690
    on Oct 16, 2017

    this resembles a croton leaf.
  • It is called Gold Dust Plant-Acuba Japonica. Beautiful shade plant. Will grow outside in mild winter climates and does well near roots of trees. I have a very large speciman growing under a huge, old Catalpa tree here in northern California. I love it. Easy care. Responds well to pruning.
    I've never tried to root one, but it may be possible.
  • Kos6435397
    on Oct 16, 2017

    acuba plant. It is easily rooted with water and doesn’t require much sun.

  • It doesn't seem to bloom, but gets berries about this time of year.
  • The berries will turn bright red later
  • Lynn Warhurst
    on Oct 16, 2017

    I live in Georgia; I've seen a bush sporting this color variation around many homes, though I've never planted one. There is no bloom; the color is only in the leaves, and, if I remember correctly, it stays "green" year round. Goes well with color blooms that will grow around it. I think it likes sun, so day lilies might do well in front of it. To sprout it, try anything that has worked for you and add some "Root Tone" to help. Right now, I'm trying to grow roots on some magnolia cuttings from my job. Have no idea if it will work, but it can't hurt to try..
  • Hialeah Rouge
    on Oct 16, 2017

    They sell them in combination pots all the time here. It looks like a type of varigated ficus. Fairly tropical. Can be grown indoors in pots in good bright lighting and humid (not soaking condition)- Best to dry out completely between waterings. I keep a spray bottle by my potted plants and spray leaves every day but only water 1x2 times per week. In South Florida they grew nicely outdoors. In Baton Rouge, the winter kills them if we don’t wrap them. They are a pretty decorative plant. Not certain about starting from cutting.

  • Lonnie Bachman
    on Oct 16, 2017

    This is from a croton named Sun Shower!

  • Gonefishing
    on Oct 16, 2017

    Looks like a Croton. We are in Zone 8, SC, and they do not overwinter here, but do in Florida.
  • Ait22358278
    on Oct 16, 2017

    Oh
  • Ait22358278
    on Oct 16, 2017

    Go to your local nursery. They can give you all the infienation you need.
  • George
    on Oct 17, 2017

    If this is a large leaf,might be a Difenbachia (Dumb Cane) if so it is a tropical plant,thrives indoors,very easy to start.
  • Susan Massey
    on Oct 17, 2017

    The common name is Gold Dust, I don't remember the botanical name. Make sure it gets NO sun! It can get 15 feet high so be careful where you put it! Frost doesn't affect it.
  • Brenda Chambers Hare
    on Oct 17, 2017

    It's called "God Dust". Just google that.

  • Susan Massey
    on Oct 17, 2017

    That's Gold Dust, sprouts in water, prefers NO sun, can stay outside even in icy weather, never blooms, gets 15' high if you don't cut it back.
  • Jackie
    on Oct 17, 2017

    It looks like a gold dust leaf. Mine do not flower. They are a great shrub for a shady spot.
  • KattywhampusLOL
    on Oct 17, 2017

    Hello Anitasmoore :) I believe this is an Aucuba Japonica Picturata or a Aucuba Japoniaca Crotonifolia, although Crotons are generally not considered bushes, but more like small green plants. I really am leaning more toward Aucuba japonica Picturata.
  • Jackie
    on Oct 17, 2017

    I’m sorry, I didn’t read the full question. Yes, you can root with rooting hormone in damp soil, you want to keep it covered in plastic, like a terrarium type situation. It takes a while, but they will root. I actually started mine that way from a storm damaged plant.
  • Gup5908274
    on Oct 17, 2017

    Aucuba?
  • Macysmom
    on Oct 17, 2017

    Take a leaf to your local nursery. Gold dust plant Aucuba?
  • Pjo26908388
    on Oct 17, 2017

    It looks like a spotted laurel or Aucuba japonica. Since it is just the leaf, that is my best guess! Good luck! This should be a good starting point to find out more.

  • Rebecca Taylor
    on Oct 17, 2017

    Hello, it looks like a spotted laurel.
  • FL
    on Oct 17, 2017

    "Your plant is called a croton goldust.
    Your plant doesn’t look like it has been over-watered. When a croton gets too much water, the leaves fall off. Crotons do need to be warm and kept away from heating and cooling vents. Temperatures below 60 degrees can cause a croton to get yellow leaves.
    Croton plants are considered very poisonous and should be kept away from pets and children. Read more about common houseplants that are poisonous in Don’t Feed Me To Your Cat! A Guide to Poisonous Houseplants.
    There are complete care instructions for a croton in the Popular Houseplant section of the website.
    Please note that this plant can be an outdoor plant, as well as a houseplant. Read more: http://homeguides.sfgate.com/croton-plants-outdoors-35056.html
  • Sherry
    on Oct 17, 2017

    I have a app it's called garden answers . It's a free app and I found it helpful . You can that a picture on app it's simple good luck . I just got a new house too that's how I found the app .

  • Ginny
    on Oct 17, 2017

    It looks like what we in the Baltimore MD are call a cuba bush. Take a sample leaf to your local garden center for an analysis.
    Cuba bushes last for yrs., are very hardy, trim well and can be rooted in water then planted.
  • Lyn
    on Oct 17, 2017

    Aucuba Japonica 'Crotonifolia' some people call it a gold dust shrub.
  • Ginny
    on Oct 17, 2017

    Looks like a cuba bush leaf to me. Take it to a garden center for a professional assessment. Cuba bushes are hardy, trim well and last for years. Have one that is at least 30 yrs. old. Can be rooted in a container with tap water then planted.
  • MawD
    on Oct 17, 2017

    I believe its the aucuba. Very hardy. We've even rooted in buckets of water. Great bushes to train as well.
  • Tar3839281
    on Oct 17, 2017

    I have these in my gardens here in Connecticut! Sometimes the branches curve towards the grpuns and I just cover them with dirt and they root. Then I transplant the new part. I am not a gardener! It winters over here surprisingly well. Sometimes leaves blacken with the cold(I always forget to wrap them) but they come back beautifully in the spring and summer.
  • Ani13089233
    on Oct 17, 2017

    thanks to everyone for helpful information! You are great!
  • Daw22006084
    on Oct 18, 2017

    Looks like a croton. Be careful. That milky white sap stains easily and is almost impossible to get out!

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