Asked on Oct 17, 2017

Anyone work with beveled subway tile?

Rachel Lynn | queenbeeofhoneydos.comLcruzVicky Davis
+7

Answered

We are trying to finish edges and our tiles don't come in 3x3.
q anyone work with beveled subway tile
8 answers
  • Big lulu
    on Oct 17, 2017

    What edges are you trying to finish? I think 3 x 3 is a very unusual size for any tile. Usually they're 2 x 2 or 4 x 4.

    The corner edges? They don't need finishing.

    Could you stand back and take a picture of the whole area?
  • Michele Pappagallo
    on Oct 17, 2017

    You could try running a line of colored caulk along the edge. Choose something that matches either your tile or your grout color and it should cover the edges of the tile and give it a more finished appearance.
  • Robyn Garner
    on Oct 17, 2017

    I'm not sure I understand what the issue is. Are you continuing the tile around the corner? If so, either work backward from the far side to where the tile will end. This is perfect if you plan to put something in the corner such as coffee pot, etc.

    If you prefer the corner to have as many full tile pieces as possible, begin the tiling from there. Any "oddities" can be touched up with matching paint if they bug you. I had odd shaped cuts on my black subway tiles so painted the cut edges black.
  • Denise Freddy Frederickson
    on Oct 18, 2017

    U can buy edging material. It comes in metal and plastic
  • Lcruz
    on Oct 18, 2017

    We have not gotten to the area the we want to end at. Which is under our cabinet that leads to an opening. The tiles when cut in half are thick and we really can't seem to find a border tile that is high enough. The ends of the beveled tile are half as thick as the center. So when they are lined up half against full, ugh. If you look at it against the bullnose trim we have in the photo you can see the difference. We were just looking for what others may have used rather than bullnose. I really hate to slop in a lot of grout.
    , 6 x 6 subway cut in half against bullnose tile
    • Paula
      on Oct 19, 2017

      I'd take a tile into a paint store and they can custom match the color to paint and get high gloss and paint the end and maybe even spray with some clear coat paint if it's not high enough gloss. you can also buy touch up porcelain paint for appliances and this looks like that common bisque color.
  • Vicky Davis
    on Oct 18, 2017

    Would it be really incorrect if you butted together 2 half tiles? So they made a "whole half" to fit there? That would give you beveled edges at both ends, and fit in with the bullnose at this end.
    • Elisa Tobia
      on Oct 20, 2017

      My tile guy (professional) made sure the tile length and pattern continue around the corner. It was a matter of cutting, pinning and grouting consistently. Seems to me if piece was cut at the same location as tile length you will automatically hit the correct bevel height.
      , These were 12x12 pieces I had cut into subway tiles by manufacturer
  • Lcruz
    on Oct 19, 2017

    We have not gotten to the area the we want to end at. Which is under our cabinet that leads to an opening. The tiles when cut in half are thick and we really can't seem to find a border tile that is high enough. The ends of the beveled tile are half as thick as the center. So when they are lined up half against full, ugh. If you look at it against the bullnose trim we have in the photo you can see the difference. We were just looking for what others may have used rather than bullnose. I really hate to slop in a lot of grout.
    , 6 x 6 subway cut in half against bullnose tile
  • My kitchen is done in beveled subway. Take a look at the edging that I used. I used a thick pencil tile (not wide) to make my ends. You can see my kitchen here https://www.houzz.com/projects/1228721/tennessee-home.
    This is my Houzz site. If you get lost, just click on Tennessee home. :-)

    If it is the corners that you are trying to solve, the answer is to miter the half cuts. In the future, try starting your beveled tile at the wall corners, with half cuts mitered, and work your way out from there.(instead of working your way towards a corner) You then make small incremental adjustments to the spacing to get it to end at the desired point at the opposite end of the wall.
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