Alicia W
Alicia W
  • Hometalker
  • Middletown, PA

Insulating A Crawl Space/Attic Door

9 Materials
$20
1 Hour
Easy

I love our nice big closet in our bedroom but I don’t love the uninsulated access door to our crawl space which is in the closet. It gets a little frigid in there winter mornings.
insulating an crawl space attic door
This is the access door to our crawl space which runs along the length of our bathroom. The access door is in our closet which is fine except the fact that the crawl space has very little insulation and neither does the door.
insulating an crawl space attic door
As you can see, using the ”flame test”, the door is a little crooked which leaves a gap at the top and the bottom which allows cold air to flow into our closet.
insulating an crawl space attic door
My husband and I have made numerous attempts to quickly put up insulation but it always ended up not working.
I decided enough was enough and I was going to insulate it correctly.
I began by removing the old stick-on insulation using a putty knife.
insulating an crawl space attic door
Then I went inside the crawl space and closed the door. Using a pencil I drew onto the door where the door frame came in contact with the door (Red line)
insulating an crawl space attic door
I purchased this pack of foam panels. They are 3/4”x13-5/8”x48” and there are 6 in a pack. I only used 3 for my door.
insulating an crawl space attic door
I began by measuring the width of the door.
insulating an crawl space attic door
A. I marked one foam panel
B. Drew a straight line
C. Cut using a utility knife
insulating an crawl space attic door
To hold the panels in place, I used painter’s tape and taped the panel to the door.
insulating an crawl space attic door
A. I drilled a pilot hole
B. Using a #10 washer & wood screw
C & D. I attached the panel to the door making the screw snug but not too tight.
I used a washer to assure that the screw didn’t got completely through the foam.
Once the door was screwed in place, I removed the painter’s tape.
insulating an crawl space attic door
For the inside door handle:
A & B. I measured and cut pieces to fit around the handle
C. I used white 3M Heavy Duty duct tape to hold the pieces in place
D. Then I added more duct tape to assure that everything out hold

I continued to add foam panels working my way down the door. Where sections of foam came together, I taped the seam with duct tape.
The red circles indicate where I attached screws to the door.
I continued to add foam panels working my way down the door. Where sections of foam came together, I taped the seam with duct tape.
The red circles indicate where I attached screws to the door.
insulating an crawl space attic door
Once all of the panels were in place, I chaulked around the edges of the panels.
insulating an crawl space attic door
Whlie the chaulk dried,
A & B. I added rubber tubing around the edge of the door
C. It is adhesive and the back peels right off
D. I attached it around the inside edge of the door
insulating an crawl space attic door
To finish,
A. I used a door sweep
B. This is also adhesive and the backing peels off
C. I applied the sweep to the bottom of the door
insulating an crawl space attic door
Now my door is completely sealed and as you can see by the “flame test”, no air is leaking through.
I’m ready for you, Old Man Winter!
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Have a question about this project?

3 of 19 questions
  • Mark
    on Feb 6, 2019

    My storm door sticks at top - opposite of hinge side

    • Dianna Blumricl
      on Feb 6, 2019

      You need to level your door. You could just shave the top of the door in that corner. Mark where it sticking so you know how much to take off. Probably just a couple of times. Go to your hardware store & tell them you need a shaving tool. Just tell them what you are wanting to do to the door. You have to take the door off probably, because it will be the easiest way to do it. Are you a handyman?

  • Carrie Berg
    on Feb 6, 2019

    My front door does not match up to the frame very well. And I can see daylight from every side. I'm a renter, so I'm limited to some options. Is it even possible to do something like this to my front door and have it look nice? I have tried all store products and nothing stays for very long.

    • On the edge of the frame on my doors (the part that your door closes up against) there is a 1/2 inch collapsible rubber-like seal. It goes on the sides and top of the frame. When the door is closed upon it, it collaspes n seals the door so air will not come in around it. The bottom of the door has a strip the depth of the door. It has several rubber-like strips going down from the door to the bottom of the door frame. This has been attached to the inside and outside of the bottom of the door.

      Both items have evidently been attached with a builders grade adhesive. There is no air coming in around my doors. I have owned my condo since Aug of 2017. Gone in n out the garage door whenever I have left, and the door seals have not budged, except to collaspe n expand.

      They also make a v-shaped seal you can put around the inside of your door frame. The point of the “v” faces towards the inside of your house. It collapses when the door is closed to seal against air coming in. It expands out when the door is opened. The ones on our old house were made of metal n probably installed around the time the house was built.(about 1975). I do not know if you can get metal ones anymore, but do know you can get them made of synthetic materials.

      I would ask a building supply store what type of door seals n adhesives builders use for doors.

      Even if you had to replace these every year, it would probably be a minimal cost vs the extra dollars you are paying for heating n cooling your home every year.


      If this solution does not work, I’d ask the landlord to fix the door. There is a slight possibility that he does not know there is a problem?

  • Nancy
    on Feb 7, 2019

    We have a bilco door...horrible...not insulated...any ideas.?

Join the conversation

3 of 67 comments
  • Robert
    on Feb 7, 2019

    Well wish you a lot of luck and hope you will not be removing fungus from within your crawl space within the next five years. Not trying to put down what you did. However Attic crawl spaces are generally not insulated for a gut reason. In your case you say it runs along your bathroom. If the warm air (in particular after showering/bathing) from your bathroom can reach the crawl space there is a good possibility of condensation as the air flow is no longer guaranteed. It will more than likely be fine, but I would keep a good eye on it. Have a nice day


    Robert

    • Rhonda
      on Feb 12, 2019

      She only insulated her door to the attic or crawl space. She did not insulate her attic. Your comment is not correct. She did not insulate her crawl space. And even then, all warm walls should be insulated. The ceiling and pony walls to the heated spaces, the door being one of them. She did not mention insulating the ceiling to the roof, which would be problematic.

  • Carmel Madden
    on Feb 10, 2019

    Super job well done

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