How to Faux Finish Weathered Wood Grain #BudgetUpgrade

3 Materials
$25
2 Hours
Easy

Do you love the Restoration Hardware tables that have that beautiful gray (driftwood-like) weathered wood? Me too. But, I can’t justify spending thousands of dollars on their furniture. Instead, I found a Craig’s List pedestal table that had the right shape and size for our kitchen. It was a cherry veneer finish, but after some paint you’d never know!


Full tutorial and instructions can be found here.

how to faux finish weathered wood grain budgetupgrade, painted furniture, woodworking projects
how to faux finish weathered wood grain budgetupgrade, painted furniture, woodworking projects

Basecoat and glazes. Full materials list is available on the blog.

how to faux finish weathered wood grain budgetupgrade, painted furniture, woodworking projects

Before you begin creating your wood grain, you should paint your surface with Valspar Woodrow Wilson Putty and allow it to dry. Start by dipping your dry brush into the medium glaze. Blot most of the glaze off onto a paper towel or rag.

how to faux finish weathered wood grain budgetupgrade, painted furniture, woodworking projects

Before the glaze can dry, drag and rock the wood grain tool through the dark glaze. When starting on the next row, I like to flip the wood grain tool around.

how to faux finish weathered wood grain budgetupgrade, painted furniture, woodworking projects

Wait for your grain to dry thoroughly. Then add the white wash layer to your surface. Dip the dry brush into the light glaze and blot most of it off onto a rag. Then VERY LIGHTLY drag the white-wash glaze over the table. This layer should skip over areas and be as random as you can manage.

how to faux finish weathered wood grain budgetupgrade, painted furniture, woodworking projects

The side of my pedestal table has an apron that is too small for the wood grain tool. So, I used a Martha Stewart wood grain comb for this area. It works well, but you won’t be able to create knots like the other tool can.

how to faux finish weathered wood grain budgetupgrade, painted furniture, woodworking projects

What do you think? Is this a good knock off of the $1,000 Restoration Hardware’s pedestal table? Or at least a close resemblance?

how to faux finish weathered wood grain budgetupgrade, painted furniture, woodworking projects

For a more durable surface, I recommend using the brush on polyurethane. It goes on thicker and creates a nearly impenetrable coating that will stand up to the worst messes your kids can dish out. However, you will need to brush on the poly in a well ventilated area and wait at least 24+ hours before using the table.


Full tutorial and answers to most questions can be found here.

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Want more details about this and other DIY projects? Check out my blog post!

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Have a question about this project?

13 questions
  • Sheila
    on Dec 11, 2015

    Did the polyurethane yellow over this light finish. I see you did this project over a year ago. Thanks for the tutorial

  • Lisa Culetta
    on Jan 4, 2016

    Is this a warm greyish colour ? Sorry, I am trying to figure if I can incorporate your technique, to a piece of furniture that I have that is painted black (as the base colour)

    • @Lisa Culetta Yes, it is a warm gray. You'd just need to paint over your black with the base color I specify. My original table was a dark mahogany color.

  • Bso28466303
    on Feb 11, 2018

    Do you need to sand the original surface?
  • Donna Pitts
    on Feb 11, 2018

    I love the look but I have the same question, Does it have to be sanded first?
  • Linda Wilkison
    on Feb 11, 2018

    Love love love the table. I have one I was thinking of doing something like this to. How did you do the pedestam part?
  • Janie
    on Feb 12, 2018

    Absolutely beautiful - what color did you use on the base?
  • Becky
    on Feb 14, 2018

    Is Asiago the gray paint ?
  • Mary
    on Mar 2, 2019

    Did you have to sand it first? That’s the part I hate. I am looking to refinish my dining set without having to do that.

    • Crystal
      on Mar 2, 2019

      You could but it would be much better if you sanded. If you’re going to put the work in, you want it to last and look it’s best 🙃

  • Sandy Buck
    on Mar 2, 2019

    Does the table need to be sanded first has a brown finish on it now

  • Michele
    on Mar 2, 2019

    I just recently slightly sanded my dining room table. Basically the film of grime that just would not come off and the protective finish is gone. The color is fine. What do I use as the sealant now to put the finish back on? Is is it the polyurethane? Is there. Particular grade or something? Thanks in advance!

  • Anne
    on Mar 3, 2019

    This is lovely!! I have a table that I’d love to refinish. It has a stow-away leaf, which I love. But it is a nude butcher block finish, which I hate. It matches nothing, but Hubby saw me looking at it and so he bought it for me.  The problem is it has a really hard poly finish that is very difficult to remove. I got the seat of one chair done after hours of sanding. I’m not a youngster anymore and the sanding really gets the arthritis screaming! Any advice for an easier way to remove it?

    • Angelina
      on Mar 3, 2019

      Use a chemical stripper, before sanding.

    • Ashley
      on Mar 4, 2019

      There is an orange chemical stripper that smells good and isnt as toxic as the others. I use that. Just get a dollar store paint brush and brush it onto the surface, wait the recommended time, and scrape it off with a putty knife. You may have to go back and do some spot sanding, but this will most definately cut down on the work load :)

    • Eric
      on Apr 28, 2019

      I’ll second Ashley’s answer. I’ve done it like that and it really works well.

  • Joyce Bowman
    on Mar 4, 2019

    i would like to do this but I'd like to do it in a darker color oak maybe. Can that be done?

  • Lana
    on Mar 6, 2019

    How do I repair a tear in my leather couch?

Join the conversation

2 of 54 comments
  • Dana Berger
    on Mar 2, 2019

    Looks amazing.. love the color and thanks for sharing... ☺

  • Melissa
    on Mar 3, 2019

    My dining room table is real wood Except the actual top of the table. It is made to look exactly like the rest of it but it’s a different material. I’m guessing to make cleaning the top easier. Would this work for this type of table? I have been wanting to restore the table by sanding and refinishing it but the top being a different material has made me worry some about doing so. Thanks!

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