Planting Strawberries in Old Gutters


Last year we tried growing our strawberries in old gutters (that we salvaged). We had great success. In the other strawberry beds we had some slug issues, but the slugs didn't seem to find the strawberries up in the gutters. it was pretty cool to rescue something that was just going the thrown out, and start growing in it. I'd like to try a few different things in the gutters now as well, to see how they go. Has anyone else tried growing in gutters? Have you had some success?
planting strawberries in old gutters, gardening, repurposing upcycling
Here you can see the strawberries growing in an old gutter.
planting strawberries in old gutters, gardening, repurposing upcycling
If you look in the background, you can see the strawberries growing up here on the wall.
planting strawberries in old gutters, gardening, repurposing upcycling
Here you can see another angle of the strawberries growing in the gutter.
Ock Du Spock

Want more details about this and other DIY projects? Check out my blog post!

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Have a question about this project?

1 question
  • Ali-897
    on Dec 4, 2016

    Like to know which variety of grapes and strawberry suitable for our situation. ie Our soil is calcareous sandy, pH 7 to 7.5, low in nitrogen and potash. We get rainfall eight month a year with 1500 mm. Temperature range from 25C to 33C. Its island situation close to sea and humid 75 to 80%. Hope you got variety of grapes and strawberry to suit our situation. Thanking you. Ali Shafeeg. Maldives.

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4 of 18 comments
  • Michael lacey
    on Dec 12, 2014

    Is dirt the American word for soil ? To us in the UK it means a worthless 'dirt' it may have been soil once but now contains no nutrients or compost that would make seeds or plants grow.

  • Jenni C.
    on Mar 13, 2015

    Has anyone tried metal vs other gutters? Is one type better for moisture & crop yield? I would use these on our upper deck...(We have problems with scrappers who steal anything metal or worth a dime, even if it's nailed down--including siding)

    • Waterdog
      on Jan 12, 2016

      @Ock Du Spock PVC plastic (aka polyvinyl chloride) is not a safe/healthy container to grow plants in. Yes, people do it, but metal is a safer choice. Do not use the following plastics in organic gardening: #3 PVC, #6 Polystyrene, #7 Other = UNSAFE

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