Susan Owens
Susan Owens
  • Hometalker
  • Dunkirk, MD

Vintage Hankies Have Found New Life as a Handmade Baby Quilt!


All but two of these vintage hankies belonged to my two grandmothers and since they were both born in 1905, I'd estimate them to be anywhere from 70-80 years old considering when they were popular. I've had them for many years, and while I have more tucked away for my own daughter's future babies, this quilt was made for my first great-niece who was just born a few weeks ago! I am a self taught seamstress (I like sew-er better as a seamstress sounds like an occupation!) and have never made a quilt before but the internet and YouTube were VERY helpful along the way! It's certainly not perfect but it was made with LOTS of love! It's VERY important to pre-wash any fabric used to make a quilt so there are no bunching issues the first time you do wash the completed project.
vintage hankies have found new life as a handmade baby quilt, crafts, repurposing upcycling
The first step was laying out the vintage hankies in a pattern to see what combination worked the best!
vintage hankies have found new life as a handmade baby quilt, crafts, repurposing upcycling
Some of the hankies were larger than the others and had to be trimmed down. I'm thankful for the rotary cutter and self-healing cutting mat as it made this so much easier!
vintage hankies have found new life as a handmade baby quilt, crafts, repurposing upcycling
These 2 hankies have had the fusible webbing ironed on to the back. The fusible webbing gives the fabric extra support and a little stiffness to make it easier to work with, and to keep it from wrinkling up. I did use this process on all of the hankies.
vintage hankies have found new life as a handmade baby quilt, crafts, repurposing upcycling
The first row that I sewed together. Being that my grandmothers were born in 1905, these hankies are probably 70-80 years old. Some of them had been washed so many times throughout the years that they weren't square anymore so I did the best I could with them!
vintage hankies have found new life as a handmade baby quilt, crafts, repurposing upcycling
Here are the 4 individual rows sewn together; the next step is to sew all the rows to one another! The yellow one on the right side was slightly smaller than the others so I improvised by adding in a filler strip.
vintage hankies have found new life as a handmade baby quilt, crafts, repurposing upcycling
The quilt top is now picture framed with pink taffeta, which came from the full length dress that my daughter wore to the wedding of my brother and his wife who are grandparents to this baby!
vintage hankies have found new life as a handmade baby quilt, crafts, repurposing upcycling
The YouTube tutorial I found gave me instructions on how to lay out the 3 layers of the quilt; the top, the backing, and the batting in between. Next step is to pin all the layers together with curved safety pins so that nothing moves!
vintage hankies have found new life as a handmade baby quilt, crafts, repurposing upcycling
Here I'm sewing the 3 layers together around the edge. See the white yarn tie right below the "Joyce" in the red hankie? I chose to "tie" the quilt together which is an old fashioned method that seemed in line with the vintage-ness of this quilt!
vintage hankies have found new life as a handmade baby quilt, crafts, repurposing upcycling
The final product! The 2 lower corners each had a personalized hankie to represent both of my grandmothers. The backing is a white rosebud minkies fabric that is SO soft!
vintage hankies have found new life as a handmade baby quilt, crafts, repurposing upcycling
The full view of the completed quilt!
vintage hankies have found new life as a handmade baby quilt, crafts, repurposing upcycling
Gotta love the internet! Found a way to make a fabric label with freezer paper! You iron the freezer paper to the back of the fabric to make it stiff enough to get thru your ink jet printer, create your label on Word, and print it out! I chose black ink as unless you have a special fabric treatment on hand to use with colored ink, the ink won't stay on. I chose to put my maiden name on the label so that if it's still around 50 years from now, they'll know exactly who made it!

Have a question about this project?

1 question
  • M. M..
    on Apr 9, 2016

    I see that some of your hankies have a stitiched,scalloped edge. I have some like this as well. Even though the stitching is hidden inside the seams, I'm wondering if it interferes with the sewing or the flatness of the fabric, esp after a few washes. Rotary cutters are wonderful for this kind of tedious trimming - I love them! did you consider lopping off the dainty scallops?

    • Susan Owens
      on Oct 8, 2016

      Hello MM! I just realized I had unanswered questions here so I apologize for the delay in answering! I did put a lot of thought in potentially trimming the dainty scalloped parts off but the ones with the scalloped parts were more uniformally square to begin with and gave them a little extra sturdiness. It wasn't hard to sew and I ironed that inside seam to one side to keep it flat. I'm not sure if it's been washed much or being kept as a special piece. Thank you!

Join the conversation

2 of 113 comments
  • Hazel Dudgeon Mann
    on Jun 15, 2017

    This has inspired me to make a quilt from all the Hankies I have from relatives that have passed on. I will give mine to a nursing home as a lap blanket.
  • Becky Albers
    on Jan 21, 2018

    I made a hanky quilt, but I appliqued the hanky's onto fabric so I didn't lose the pretty edges. I also used something on the back to make them a little sturdier. A couple of the hankies had small stains on then and I embroidered small, delicate embroidery over those spots. These are very special gifts for special people.

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