Very Sturdy But Cute Hose Guards

3 Materials
$50
45 Minutes
Easy

When I pull my hoses around a corner, invariably it drags right through my flowers and rips some out. To solve this problem I bought cheap plastic hose guards at the hardware store. Hubby hit them with the mower and several of them broke. So I went back to said hardware store and bought the expensive iron ones. Very cute but the screw-in part rusted through in one season. UGH! So I made these. After I collected all my supplies, they took about 45 minutes to make, including the time it took my handy husband to cut the pipe for me and including the time it took to pound ten of them into the ground.
I bought glass doorknobs at Home Depot for $8/pair. (I forgot to take a pic with them still in the package.) I made 10 hose guards, so I needed 5 packages ($40 total).
I bought long, galvanized bolts with the same threading as the inside of the doorknob, and screwed them in. These were $1 each.
The doorknob-bolt combo fit down inside a 3/4" galvanized pipe, which my husband cut for me, to 15" each. The pipe we had on hand, but if you were to buy it, it is about $15 for a 60" one, which yields 4 pieces. I wanted them long enough to pound into the ground far enough that the mower won't push them out of plumb. I plan to leave the pipes in the ground year-round, and take the doorknob-bolt combo in for winter and set them back out in the spring.
I pounded the pipes into the dirt with my husband's heavy brass mallet, so it did all the work for me, and didn't smash the top of the pipe in. This was very easy, six or seven hits for each pipe. 15 minutes total for ten hose guards.
Drop the doorknob-bolt in and stand back and admire. (Now I can drag my hoses out of the basement and start the real work. Hahaha!!) My cost was $5 each, or $50 for ten cute hose guards. If you had to buy your pipe, they would come out to about $9 each. These seem a little pricy, but this is actually about the same as the more expensive metal hardware store ones which rusted through their weakest place in just one summer. But these are mostly galvanized, so I have high hopes that they will last a long time if I take the doorknob part inside in the winter.
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Have a question about this project?

31 questions
  • GrammaLee
    on May 30, 2018

    What are hose guards to begin with

  • Marcia
    on May 30, 2018

    I love the idea, but how did you know the threading was the same on the pipe and the door knobs? If you want to make some money I would buy 2 from you.

    • Jim Cox
      on May 30, 2018

      You can test the bolts in the store to your doorknob - but I'll bet with the set screw on the knob, you only need correct diameter, not thread. As for the pipe, the bolts just drop in. The head of the bold keeps things more straignt.

    • Kim
      on May 30, 2018

      I got the wrong bolts at first, and then the man at the hardware store showed me how to test the threading. Jim is right that I really didn't need that. The set screw would have held a thinner one in place. The pipes are threaded, because that's what we had on hand, but that threading is unnecessary.

  • Cindy Steffen-Fenske
    on May 30, 2018

    So Cool!

    My Question: What is the ground cover with the little purple flowers?

    • Stephanie
      on May 30, 2018

      Looks like Myrtle, also known as vinca or periwinkle. be careful can be very invasive. Great for landscaping ground cover. I have a hillside of it and it has traveled into other parts of my yard. Only blooms in spring, but it is pretty.


    • Priscilla McIntosh
      on May 30, 2018

      I believe it is vinca vine.

    • Mm.16271273
      on May 30, 2018

      It looks like periwinkle......comes in white flowers as well

    • Debb
      on May 30, 2018

      Looks like periwinkle

    • Cha2060469
      on May 30, 2018

      Pretty sure it’s vinca minor...google it to confirm.

    • Sharyl
      on May 30, 2018

      Yep it’s vinca!

    • Kim
      on May 30, 2018

      Yes, it’s vinca.

    • Glenyce Larson Rodenbaugh
      on May 30, 2018

      common name is Myrtle

    • Ohio Sandie
      on May 30, 2018

      Very very invasive, I can’t get rid of it in my garden, wish I had never planted it😬

    • Shari A. Reno
      on May 31, 2018

      All vinca (minor and major) is listed by the government as an invasive plant species. Unbeknown to me I planted it around 20 years ago under my large tree. When I tried to dig it out it had spread all over and under my tree. In fact i looked at my tree this morning and it looks like it is cracking down the center. The vinca had grown into my tree! I am sick as it is a wonderful tree. I definitely wish I had never planted it.


      NEVER plant vinca and dig it out if you have as it is VERY invasive. READ: https://www.in.gov/dnr/files/Periwinkle.pdf


  • Pam
    on May 30, 2018

    Where did you find glass door knobs for $8 a pair?

  • Cho9674404
    on May 31, 2018

    what does this have to do with the hose?

    • Heather
      on May 31, 2018

      She explained it in the introduction. They are hose guards to protect her flowers from the hose as it is being moved around. She tried store bought hose guards, but the plastic ones were too easy to break and the metal ones rusted too quickly.

    • C Crow
      on May 31, 2018

      Beautiful and clever!

    • Kim
      on May 31, 2018

      When I pull my hoses around a corner, they rip through my flowers. This holds them back. I should have had a picture of the hose there.

  • Betty
    on Jun 1, 2018

    Did you get the door knobs at home depot ?

  • MsTerri
    on Jun 5, 2018

    The bolts have a head on them but when screwed in know picture shows no head, where did it go?

    • Kim
      on Jun 6, 2018

      The bolt with the doorknob on it just gets dropped down into the pipe. The pipe stays in the ground year after year, but the doorknob with the bolt screwed in gets brought in during the winter.

  • Terri Kivett Walker
    on Jun 6, 2018

    Interesting. How does it create light?

    • Kim
      on Jun 6, 2018

      It does not create light. That's just the sun creating a glare on my poor photography skills! LOL. They really do glint in the sun. They're glass doorknobs.

    • Jennifer
      on May 16, 2019

      lol

  • Nancy Alexander
    on Jun 6, 2018

    Love the idea how is the light created ?

    • Kim
      on Jun 6, 2018

      These are not lights. They could be though if you dropped solar lights into them, as many people have suggested.

  • Nancy Alexander
    on Jun 6, 2018

    I love the idea how is the light created ?

    • Melissa Yearsley Harper
      on Jun 6, 2018

      no light

    • Kim
      on Jun 6, 2018

      Melissa is right. These are not lights. They could be though if you dropped solar lights into them, as many people have suggested. (Thank you Melissa for reading the post!)

  • Lisa Garrett Granger
    on Jun 6, 2018

    I’m confused. How is it a light?

    • Kim
      on Jun 6, 2018

      These are not lights. They could be though if you dropped solar lights into them, as many people have suggested.

    • Kim
      on Jun 17, 2018

      Although I can't see it, it seems that Hometalk didn't read the post, and put something about lights in the title. No lights, but there could be, as many people have suggested.

  • Gen14143848
    on Jun 6, 2018

    Where do you get light from?

    • Kim
      on Jun 6, 2018

      These are not lights. They could be though if you dropped solar lights into them, as many people have suggested.

  • Ladybug895
    on Jun 6, 2018

    Love the idea. But how do you get the lights for nighttime

    • Kim
      on Jun 7, 2018

      There are no lights in this project, but several people have suggested the great idea of dropping solar lights into these pipes. Mine are just hose guards.

  • Ruby R. Galvan
    on Jun 6, 2018

    What about the light I don't see anything about lights!!!!!

    • Kim
      on Jun 6, 2018

      These are not lights. They could be though if you dropped solar lights into them, as many people have suggested.

    • Jean
      on Jun 6, 2018

      Wow, obviously the Hometalk title for this was incorrect regarding lights. Not a big deal lol

    • Kim
      on Jun 7, 2018

      Right. No lights. There are no lights in this project, but several people have suggested the great idea of dropping solar lights into these pipes. Mine are just hose guards.

    • Ann
      on Jun 8, 2018

      I would be watering during the day so I wouldn’t need lights, and the string of lights could be a tripping and tangling hazard with the hose. I think what you did was perfect and beautiful! Great job !

  • Christa Ortiz
    on Jun 6, 2018

    Get small led solar lights and stick them in the pole before the knob? Great idea!

    • Kim
      on Jun 6, 2018

      Great idea!

    • Siegrid Monika Yebba
      on Jun 6, 2018

      Don’t you need little solar panels and batteries for solar lights?

      Also, the announcement for this DIY says: make cute little lights. This is a great project with two purposes.

    • Kim
      on Jun 7, 2018

      Right, there are no lights in this project, but several people have suggested the great idea of dropping solar lights into these pipes. Mine are just hose guards. Hometalk sometimes doesn't read the posts either. :)

    • Bobbie
      on Jun 8, 2018

      If the galvanized bolts are screwed in door knob then how will the solar lights fit?

  • Mary Hofstra
    on Jun 8, 2018

    What in the world is a hose guard? Never heard of such a thing. What do you need them for and why did you need 10 of them? Pretty little things in your yard! I LOVE those door knobs! We had them in our first house and HATED them when we moved in there 32 years ago! Now I wish we would've switched them all out and taken those with us! They were antiques!

    • Kim
      on Jun 8, 2018

      A hose guard is to prevent the hose from ripping through my flower beds when I drag the hose around a corner. I need 10 of them because I have 10 corners where the hose was pulling through the flowers. Other hose guards I had before were too flimsy to last. These are very sturdy.

    • Patricia Langford
      on Jun 9, 2018

      I'm with Mary, I didn't know what they were. Very smart, but I didn't know I needed them.

    • Mary Nicholson Kiesecker
      on Jun 9, 2018

      My hose is pulling at my dolor lighting. I did know about the hose guards and even have a few but they are spend for what you get. Might try putting my solar lights in or on the galvanized pipe...

    • Marsha J Johnson Booker
      on Jun 24, 2018

      I never knew there was a “name” for it/them but everything has a name right? 😂! But yes if you enjoy 😉 your flowers 💐 or garden and need to drag a hose around you certainly don’t want it destroying your plants 🌱. Here is a picture of what I use.

  • Julie Hoffman Steele
    on Jun 16, 2018

    Will solar lights get enough charge to light up with the door knob in the way? Might as well just but solar lights to light your path then

    • Kim
      on Jun 17, 2018

      These are not lights.

    • Flipturn
      on Jun 19, 2018

      Solar lights are only as good as the extent that direct sunlight can shine on the panels during daylight hours. Depending on the shade and shadows cast over the knob portion of the hose guards, the solar lights may not 'light up' very much, or not at all after dark.

      Also the quality of solar lights varies greatly. At the lower priced end they have low lumens, small batteries, and are not hardy to withstand outdoor elements.

      Kim chose the materials for her hose guards due to their strength and durability, so that they will be effective in holding the hose from going over the flowers.

  • Marsha J Johnson Booker
    on Jun 24, 2018

    Won’t the glass door knobs break or chip. I love ❤️ the idea and bet they are lovely when light reflects off of them.

    • Kim
      on Jun 25, 2018

      They might. I hope not! Thanks!

    • Joe Holton
      on Jul 3, 2018

      The doorknobs are nearly the strongest part of this project. They only sit there looking pretty. No one is hitting or banging on them... They are solid glass and quite strong.

    • Joyce Tutterow
      on Jul 18, 2018

      They shouldnt.they are pretty solid!

  • Mary Tobin
    on Jun 27, 2018

    I'm confused. I clicked on the image and it took me to Amazon and glass knobs are $108. 00 for 2 not $8.00 as in your post. Are the same glass knobs $8.00 at HD ?

  • Joe Holton
    on Jul 3, 2018

    Curious... Does the "long bolt" that screws into the knob only extend into the pipe that is left above ground ?

    • Kim
      on Jul 4, 2018

      It's about at ground level, but I didn't measure. LOL. They may heave a little when it freezes, but I won't be pulling hoses or mowing then.

    • Lma33527127
      on Jul 22, 2018

      It would help with high winds so you don't loose your knobs :)

  • Cher
    on Jul 22, 2018

    Would it be possible to turn them into lights?

    • Mis5751357
      on Jul 23, 2018

      I’m sure there is a way to add lights in them

    • Kim
      on Jul 23, 2018

      If you placed solar path lights down into the pipes, they would work fine, and last a lot longer too.

    • Mini
      on Aug 15, 2018

      how would you do that?

    • Donna Bailey
      on Sep 16, 2018

      I’m going to look into lighting the doorknobs. How lovely it would be. Get a length of pipe an then. Have a handy guy put thread on one end. He’ll know what I’m talking bout and how to to do it. I love my redwood ones because I have redwood trees in my yard.

  • Brigitte Anderson
    on Aug 5, 2018

    Is there any significance in using "glass door knobs?" What's the special feature in oppose to using something else? :-)

    • Kim
      on Aug 5, 2018

      I just really like the way the glass door handles look. The other thought I had was to use some old vintage outdoor water faucet handles like these. I'll try to attach a picture.

    • M sakelik
      on Aug 29, 2018

      can use about any desired top, she probably like the crystal glass decorative look. Probably can just put a metal cap the top too. Anything goes?

    • Donna Bailey
      on Sep 16, 2018

      I just use nice Trudy redwood stakes. Looks great, won’t rot, termites won’t bother them and they’ll last year after year.

    • Donna Bailey
      on Sep 16, 2018

      I meant STURDY, redwood

    • Murphy
      on Sep 27, 2018

      Are the knobs there so noone trips over the pipes? It looks like they only stick out of the ground about a foot, if that. I would of left them out a little higher & stuck a solar light stake in the pipe.....just me.

    • Olivia Brock-Wehmeyer
      on Oct 13, 2018

      Again, it is simply for the look..... You can stick anything you want down in the stake! Vintage knobs and projects featuring them are in right now.

    • Beverly
      on Oct 20, 2018

      It’s simply pretty!

  • Tammy
    on Oct 11, 2018

    i dont get how you use this, to guard your fower beds, ehere does the hose get placed

    • Kim
      on Oct 11, 2018

      When I drag the hose around the corner of a flower bed, it would always drag through the flowers and tear them out and mash them down. This keeps the hose out, but I can still pull it around.

    • Jeannine Grimmer Simpson
      on Oct 18, 2018

      Hi! See below :) I had to look it up, as well :)

  • Belinda
    on Oct 14, 2018

    How do you get the lights in how do you get the lights in them how do you get the lights in the door knobs

    • Kim
      on Oct 14, 2018

      No lights in mine. But you sure could use solar lights and slip them down in the pipe. It would make them MUCH more sturdy.

    • Helen Dicaprio
      on Dec 1, 2018

      I think you are seeing the sunlight reflected in the door knob.

    • Mara
      on May 16, 2019

      No light!

    • Christine Pardo
      on May 16, 2019

      Use solar lights instead of door knobs.

    • Donna
      on May 16, 2019

      That's too expensive, 2/$8.

      Go to architectural salvage place, old time hardware store or old antique or garage sales & you can get old glass door knobs. Old houses all had them indoors. I've got alot from my cleaning out my parents & grandparents homes.

  • Joe Ochap
    on Nov 2, 2018

    Your link for the glass doorknobs at $8/pair goes to Amazon where they are $108.00 for a pair???

  • HandyGirl
    on May 16, 2019

    What a great idea! I never thought of using bolts to stick into doorknobs. Wonder what else I could use doorknobs for???

  • Barbara Brookie White
    on May 16, 2019

    Can you use PVC pipe and not have rust issues?

    I love the DIY approach but need a light as well. Solar lights have never worked for us.

    • Erin
      on May 17, 2019

      I was thinking pvc too.

    • Kim
      on May 17, 2019

      I don't think there would be a way to pound pvc pipes down into the ground. These are galvanized, so they won't rust. Also, I had solar lights before, and their flimsy little plastic posts broke off and would never have been strong enough for a hose guide. I think pvc might be too flexible too, even if you did find a way to drive it down into the ground. I also don't like a plastic for the looks. One more thought, is that several people have pointed out that you could use my galvanized pipes (nice and strong) and then drop some solar lights down in, rather than the door knobs. Good luck!

    • Billy
      on May 23, 2019

      The galvanized pipe will Rust but it takes a lot longer for it to

    • Carla Adams Ortiz
      on May 23, 2019

      You could paint the PVC a metallic color to hide the plastic!!

    • Joe Jones
      on May 24, 2019

      Pvc isn’t flexible once it’s in the ground all of the way. Yes you can pound it all the way in there are a couple ways to do it. Cut one end so it’s a point and use a piece of metal pipe to put pilot holes if you have hard soil. I live in Florida so I could probably drive straws in the ground. My question was couldn’t he just not run your hose guides over? I avoid all kinds of things. For $50 plus the ones you broke and the ones that rusted you could have bought a pretty decent weed eater or an edger and kept the mower away from them at all

    • Barbara Brookie White
      on May 24, 2019

      Thank you all. We have a B&B and really do need lights for guests and us, but hose guides too.

  • Sandra
    on May 23, 2019

    Why do you remove the door knobs from the hose guards in the winter?

    • Lynne
      on May 23, 2019

      Glass would crack and break due to freezing temperatures.

    • Kay
      on May 23, 2019

      Would you plug the hole in the pipe to prevent water from building up and rusting?

    • Kim
      on May 23, 2019

      These are galvanized, so they won't rust (for a long time anyway) so I don't plug them or cover them.

    • Joe Jones
      on May 24, 2019

      Galvanized pipe doesn’t rust especially not in your life time and pounded in the ground. It takes oxygen and water to create rust not just water and plugging the holes would just make the water collect in the dirt outside the pipe it’s going to regardless if it’s that wet it’ll fill from the bottom up

  • Sharon Swanson
    on May 24, 2019

    I love them. Would copper pipes work? I realize they’re expensive but I think they would age beautifully. And I live in Southern California so probably wouldn’t need to take them out in winter. Great idea, btw.

    • Kim
      on May 24, 2019

      Copper is so much softer than galvanized, I am not sure how you would pound them into the ground, and they would bend easily. But you're right, they would look great!

    • Joe Jones
      on May 24, 2019

      You can get very stiff copper that yes would pound into the ground just like I mentioned doing the pvc

  • Jean
    on May 24, 2019

    What about using vox pipes? Would that be cheaper?

  • Patty V.
    on Jun 30, 2019

    Would PVC pipe work for this project?

    • Kim
      on Jun 30, 2019

      I think it is too bendy to hold the hoses back. I also can't picture how you would pound them into the ground.

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