Repair That Missing Trim

6 Materials
$35
2 Hours
Medium

That beautiful treasure you found is almost perfect. The exception is, there are a few pieces of the filigree or trim missing. The odds are you will never find a match and it can be quite expensive to have a furniture repair service recreate something that you will paint over. Here is how we do it at

This decorative area of the drawer is missing
This method of repair is actually not difficult to do if you have the knowledge, the products and tools to do it. They are simple: PAM spray (any light oil will work), a hot glue gun, small can of auto bondo with hardener, stir/mixing sticks (I use popsicle sticks) and 120 grit sandpaper. I have included pictures along with the steps.

First, there has to be an area that matches the missing filigree or trim. In my case the piece to the left of my drawers of this mahogany buffet was the same as the pieces missing on the right.
Begin by spraying the right side of the piece you want to match with PAM spray. You can use any light oil. It is merely to help in releasing the mold you will make. Take the hot glue and cover the area you are matching completely.
When the glue cools, add several layers to build up the mold you are creating.
Once that area has totally cooled, carefully lift the mold you created.
Now for the next step, the Bondo. This happens fairly quick and make sure you are not distracted during this process as the bond sets up quickly. Auto Bondo can be purchased at any auto parts store. It comes in two parts. Using the ratio of the bondo, dip out what you think will fit into your mold. Now this part is where you need to have no distractions.  
Add the hardener and mix well using the stirring stick, then place the bondo into the mold and overfill just a bit.
Quickly place the mold in the area that is missing and press in place pushing out the excess. Let this sit and set up. usually 20 minutes.
It will be warm as it sets up and when it feels room temperature it has cured and is ready to remove the mold. Slowly lift up an edge and peel the mold away.
Scrape away and sand the area free of excess bondo, Clean up the oil and you are ready to paint. 
See how easy that was? You can use this same technique on may things, like Jacobean furniture, Caiibre feet, and endless areas that are missing.
Beautiful!
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Have a question about this project?

69 questions
  • Karen
    on Jul 1, 2018

    Very ingenious! My question is, in case the 'new' piece will not fit into it's new home to set up, can you set the 'new piece' in the mold to the side to cure. Then release the piece and place it into it's new home? Thanks so much for your time and for sharing!

    • MeLynda Rinker
      on Jul 2, 2018

      I love working with Bondo for all of my wood repairs. You could use the hot glue to make the mold and then pour the Bondo in and let it set up first and then glue in the piece to where it needs to go, but it sets within about two minutes. BE SURE to get it really flat prior to letting it set if you will be gluing the piece in place later. It is very hard setting and will be difficult to sand smooth if you let it set all bumpy. (Been there done that, and shredded my sandpaper on a bumpy section I thought I would smooth later. lol).


      So yes, you can, but be very certain to get it as flat as you possibly can before it sets.


    • Jan DeLong
      on Jul 2, 2018

      I would also like to know the answer to this.


  • AG
    on Jul 2, 2018

    Yes will use would like to use in chess pieces. Any suggestions on how I can do this?

  • Che30001531
    on Jul 2, 2018

    "Clean up the oil and you are ready to paint." What oil? I don't see "oil" in the step by step.

  • Mary Dodge
    on Jul 2, 2018

    WI'll this work on ornate picture frames where the original clay has been knocked off?

    • Myz29674957
      on Jul 2, 2018

      Small areas that need to be repaired you could use chewing gum. Chew a stick or two pieces of chewing gum until the sugar is gone then press into the damaged area forming the affected area. Let dry then carve and sand to the desired shape.

  • Debra Athas
    on Jul 2, 2018

    Is it possible to mold a piece, remove from the mold, clean it up, then apply to the furniture with glue, tiny nails, or similar?

    • Ruth Giza
      on Jul 2, 2018

      I haven't tried this but wood putty will take stain and I think that is what a friend who restores furniture for a living uses. He uses a more complicated method to make a mold but it sounds like this method should work well. I can hardly wait to try it.

    • Greg Kovacich
      on Jul 2, 2018

      Bondo won't take stain. It's meant to be painted over in auto body repairs. You don't want it to absorb anything when painting a car!

    • Debra Athas
      on Jul 9, 2018

      Yes, I have seen more complicated ways of getting this done, so I like the sound of this method and the materials. It surely makes perfect sense, but I didn’t know that detail about Bondo, so that’s very helpful. Thanks for your replies!

  • Jessica Goodwin
    on Jul 2, 2018

    Will Bondi accept stain? I don’t want to paint the piece. Thank you!


    • DW
      on Jul 2, 2018

      probably not, auto bondo is a fiberglass product..and if you do this, DO NOT BREATH THE DUST from sanding it..

    • Leslie
      on Jul 2, 2018

      Jyc I was thinking that wood filler might be used instead of Bondo. Make sure you mix the filler in its can well before placing inside your glue mold. I am not sure if a release agent such as the light oil should be used inside the mold. The process is inexpensive so experimenting should be no problem. Good luck :)

    • Marilla Waltrip Monroe
      on Jul 2, 2018

      USE WOOD FILLER INSTEAD.

      Please pardon my caps. :)

    • Glenda Topping
      on Jul 2, 2018

      You gave really clear instructions a project many of us have. Thank you.

    • Glenda Topping
      on Jul 2, 2018

      You gave really clear instructions a project many of us have. Thank you.

    • Cheryl
      on Jul 2, 2018

      Thanks for sharing. Great idea.

    • Jjd29793003
      on Jul 2, 2018

      Bondo may accept stain as it is porous, it is a talc based product not fiberglass, there is another product made of fiberglass . You could also try mixing a bit of stain in the bondo before adding the gardener to give it color. Also in this article the hardener is blue it also comes in a brick red which may help match your stain.

  • Ani26891238
    on Jul 2, 2018

    Will the Bondo take stain instead of paint?

    • DW
      on Jul 2, 2018

      probably not, auto bondo is a fiberglass product..and if you do this, DO NOT BREATH THE DUST from sanding it..

  • Robin Steury
    on Jul 2, 2018

    Wonderful technique! Do you need to spray the mold again with Pam before filling with Bondo? Sorry if a dumb question.

    • Leslie
      on Jul 2, 2018

      Robin, I was wondering about the same thing and no question is dumb when not sure of something. :) I agree this is a wonderful technique and the molding process can possibly be used in other applications such as plaster of Paris etc.


    • Leslie
      on Jul 2, 2018

      I was wondering that as well. I guess it couldn't hurt!

    • Becky Miller
      on Jul 2, 2018

      I have the same question: Should the mold be sprayed before adding bondo?


    • MMM
      on Jul 3, 2018

      He answered this in another question thread. I had the same question. Yes, you spray the mold with Pam before you fill it with Bondo or wood filler. :)

  • Twi15200807
    on Jul 2, 2018

    This looks amazing. I have an antique hutch that needs to have a piece reattached, but sandpaper and paint would damage the integrity of the furniture. Any ideas? Great job!

    • Ginger
      on Jul 2, 2018

      You say the hutch needs to have a piece reattached. Do you have the piece or do you need to replicate one? I assume you want to leave all in its natural wood state. If you are replicating the piece, why not try casting it with Durhams Water Putty that can be mixed with water based stain of your choice. Hope this helps. http://www.waterputty.com/casting.html

    • Twi15200807
      on Jul 3, 2018

      Thanks so much, Ginger. I've never heard of the putty. Yes, I want to leave the wood in its natural state. I appreciate your help!

  • Danielle Peterson
    on Jul 2, 2018

    Love this! Can you use wood putty? Or any other product or would you suggest only bondo

    • Charlee Hunter
      on Jul 2, 2018

      Yes you can, however depending on what you use, you may want to let it harden in the mold, and then use a strong glue to glue on the piece afterwards.

    • Sam
      on Jul 2, 2018

      I used Bondo in a class on repairing picture frames using this technique. Bondo is extremely toxic, I had painful lungs from the fumes. I recommend wood putty or explore other options.


    • Peter
      on Jul 2, 2018

      BONDO cannot be stained... but "plastic wood" can. Same chemistry -

      SAM, it says use with adequate ventilation! I've used bondo plenty of times... best to use outdoors or in vented garage... no lasting effects here. If your lungs feel pain you ignored the fumes too long.

      The PAM is a 'mold release'... wherever it's used, the product will have trouble sticking.

    • Andrea Bunny
      on Jul 2, 2018

      Do you know which companys wood putty actually takes the stain. I forget because some do not take stain, tho' they claim to

    • Nancy Peterman
      on Jul 2, 2018

      A quick read of the labels will tell you!


  • Danielle Peterson
    on Jul 2, 2018

    Love this! Can you use wood putty? Or any other product or would you suggest only bondo

    • Mike Macon
      on Jul 3, 2018

      Bondo fits my patience level. Sanding and painting in 20 minutes wood filler shri ks as it sets.

  • Laurel Galvan
    on Jul 2, 2018

    I am a bit confused on spraying the Pam. You said the left door had the filigree you were making the mold of and the right door needed the filigree and you sprayed the Pam on the RIGHT door. Does this help attached the Bondo? Or was it the LEFT door sprayed with Pam to release the Bondo?

    • Charlee Hunter
      on Jul 2, 2018

      I spray pam on the piece I'm copying, that makes it easier to release the 'glue mold'. I then spray pam on the mold and wipe. Then add the material I'm using aka bondo or wood replacer, to make it easier to release the mold from the completed piece.


    • Gail Peterson
      on Jul 2, 2018

      Read the info again, you’ll get it!

    • Mike Macon
      on Jul 2, 2018

      Laurel, it is "the left of my drawers" was where the good trim was to copy/make the hot glue mold. Charles is right in that the PAM is merely to help release the mold when cooled.

  • Jeri Walker
    on Jul 2, 2018

    I understand on how to make the mold but do not know how to glue in on. Did you glue it on with wood glue after you released it from mold.

  • Denise
    on Jul 2, 2018

    Wow! Thank you ever so much for this information!

    Im elated!

    Eager to replace missing trim on several old things.

    Have you ever tried to mix wood stain with the bondo before placing it in the mold?


    • Mike Macon
      on Jul 3, 2018

      That is an idea, i just do not know how it would affect the integrity of the bondo, and you would have to be quick.

  • Cathy Kilpatrick
    on Jul 3, 2018

    Could the same technique be used on a drawer pull?

    • Joann Gonnella Cope
      on Jul 3, 2018

      I know bondo sets up pretty hard but I don't know how well it would last to the weight of the drawer being pulled on it...

  • Cathy Kilpatrick
    on Jul 3, 2018

    Can this technique be used to duplicate an old drawer pull?

    • Mike Macon
      on Jul 3, 2018

      That back of a pull but it would not be strong enough for the handle.

    • Sheila
      on Jul 3, 2018

      I would think you could do it with anything. Just remember it will need to be repainted to match the existing drawer pulls.

    • Tam 15076171
      on Jul 3, 2018

      you can use fiberglass tub patch or car patch either one i'm pretty sure it will harden good enough. If you have old drawer pulls and cabinet knobs a friend of mine had one of each missing so she began looking at different antique sales and shops and such and she used a different one on each drawer and cabinet it is really cute

  • Hma27883194
    on Jul 3, 2018

    Thank You!! Can you stain the bindi with wood stain?

    • Sheila
      on Jul 3, 2018

      Not sure since people usually spray paint bondo on cars. You can only know if you try. If it doesn’t stay, then lightly sand off residue & try something else.

    • Joann Gonnella Cope
      on Jul 3, 2018

      I think it would work but I would try a stain+ poly in one, I wonder about the finish being different and absorbancy different

    • Marilyn Mckinney
      on Jul 3, 2018

      Great idea!!

    • Tammy Coyle
      on Jul 3, 2018

      I highly doubt that staining the bondo will look right. If you need to stain the wood then buy a matching wood puddy. Use that instead of the bondo. It should stick to the wood fine since that's what it's designed to do and the color will match much better. Make sure the package says that you can stain it. I believe there may be some that aren't for staining.

  • Beth
    on Jul 3, 2018

    And the bondo sticks to the surface without the help of a glue or anything? What if the surface is not wood but metal, etc.?

    • Monique
      on Jul 3, 2018

      You'll need to glue this. Liquid nail or gorilla glue will stick to anything

    • Mike Macon
      on Jul 4, 2018

      Bondo stcks to wood. It is formulated for metal. That is why it is Auto Bondo

    • Donna Williams
      on Jul 9, 2018


      You can buy all purpose bondo at Lowes. Used it this spring to repair old wooden window sills in my 100yr old home. Worked like a charm. I even used it to repair a wooden hair stick that got broken.

  • Brocho
    on Jul 3, 2018

    Does the mold easily peel off the Bondo? Do you need to use a bit of oil in the mold before setting in the Bondo?

    • Mike Macon
      on Jul 3, 2018

      The mold does not stick to the bondo. The hot gle mold is flexible.

  • Rachel Lagestee
    on Jul 5, 2018

    Mike

    After you have your replacement piece and it is sanded and ready to use what do you adhere it with?

    • Mike Macon
      on Jul 5, 2018

      Bondo is adhesive. You fill the mold with Bondo and quickly place it where it is to adhere.

    • Carrie
      on Jul 9, 2018

      What an amazing and creative hack. I have a few pieces of furniture that are missing trim pieces that I cannot bear to part with. Thanks for your idea is going to come in so handy.

    • Cathe Ashcraft
      on Jul 9, 2018

      I believe bondo is a glue of sorts in itself. So it will stick to the wood as it drys

    • Tammy tays
      on Jul 9, 2018

      This is great. My husband & I have been renovating an 1880's RR house and we have used bondo on lots of old wood and such during the project to fix areas that need fixing. I will have to try this hot glue trick on the next window we redo. Thanks for sharing!

  • Brenda Quinn Kennedy
    on Jul 9, 2018

    I love it! I have a very old mirror that hung in my great grandmother's bedroom. She was 87 I think when she died in 1968. And at that time there were 2 cherubs at the top center of the mirror. One had already broken and fell off so I'm guessing that's how I inherited it. But I painted it gold and hung it up and proudly displayed it as is for years. Now I think I can possibly recreate the other cherub, except I have to figure a way to turn it in the opposite direction. Any Ideas on how to do this? Please help!

    • Eha3549601
      on Jul 9, 2018

      Perhaps create the mold going in the wrong direction first then set it up let it dry. Then lay that mold down on a flat piece of paper, trace around then flip over and redo process so you have a mirror image.

    • Brenda Quinn Kennedy
      on Jul 9, 2018

      That's pretty much my question when the backside of the other cherub is flat, it's not gonna be so easy to just turn it in the other direction unless, the mold is made, dried, and cured and I could manage to recreate with a carvers knife the cherub on the backside by site and then make another mold of that one. Alot of work but, I have always had a bit of talent to look at something and recreate it very similarly. Crossing my fingers that would work. Would be nice if they had saved the original cherub.

    • Cheryl Rando
      on Jul 9, 2018

      Create one exactly as they stated. To create a reverse mold, use that to form another in plaster. Google how to make a reverse copy for videos.



    • Kris Camille
      on Jul 9, 2018

      I JUST ♥️♥️ THIS INGENUITY & CREATIVITY!! Who would’ve thought!!

      THANX 4 SHARING!!!

  • Cheryl Dixon
    on Jul 9, 2018

    Can the Bondo be stained?

    • Mike Macon
      on Jul 9, 2018

      It can but it will react different than the wood.

    • Lana Klatt
      on Jul 9, 2018

      I had the same thought. I wonder if you could use the same process with wood putty (which is stainable). You might have to glue it down. But should work with the mold

    • Lana Klatt
      on Jul 9, 2018

      I had the same thought. I wonder if you could use the same process with wood putty (which is stainable). You might have to glue it down. But should work with the mold

    • Tammy tays
      on Jul 9, 2018

      What do you clean the oil off with so that paint or stain adheres?

  • Carolyn Kieta Ambrosino
    on Jul 9, 2018

    Do you know if the bondo would take stain? Or only paint?

  • Norma Jean
    on Jul 9, 2018

    I recently moved and the movers damaged my headboard and dresser. What I am most concerned about is the little gouge the put in my headboard... I've done everything to try to fill it in and nothing worked... Can you please help me? Thank you

    • Nicole Lago
      on Jul 9, 2018

      Bondo will definitely work for this. Then you will need to lightly sand. Then paint. If it's stained you will need to use a wood putty that you can stain. Then it should look brand new.

    • ArtistDarlaDixon
      on Jul 9, 2018

      If the gouge is small, wood shavings mixed well with white glue like Elmer’s makes an excellent cheap wood filler. You can raid shavings from a pencil sharpener or use sanding paper to get wood from an inconspicuous place of the back leg of the headboard if that would help it match. Have more wood content than glue. Pack it in then sand with a fine grit sandpaper very gently. Then furniture wood matching markers to color it in, & I would blot it a bit to make sure it blends. On top of that I would probably use a little wax, like a crayon of the same tone or color, and rub that in to match the sheen of the rest of the headboard. If you are concerned about results, you could do a small bit of damage to the backside of the headboard to test how it takes these ideas before you proceed.

    • Nancy Beckwith
      on Jul 9, 2018

      I once bought a gorgeous Tommy Bahama mirror, with a big, round frame around it. But the frame had a huge gouge in it. I knew what to,do....and so I got it super cheap! Go to your nearest craft shop and get ( in your case) a packet of that clay that hardens. For your purposes, you won't have to make it. It comes in many colors and in small, flat squares. Push this stuff into your gouges, removing excess. When dry, paint it or stain it to match your stuff. Voila! Easy easy, cheap and works perfectly. ( a week after the mirror was hung, I couldn't even find the spot I had repaired!)

    • Doris Storlien
      on Jul 9, 2018

      Yes, you can repair lots of wood items with Elmer’s glue and sawdust. Works great !!!

    • Sandra
      on Jul 10, 2018

      Need sawdust? Go to Home Depot or Loews where they cut wood and you might be able take hoe a baggie full.

    • You can find sawdust on Amazon!

    • Carrie
      on Jul 10, 2018

      Good idea. I have a desk that I will try this technique on.

      Thank You

  • Arabella Fish
    on Jul 9, 2018

    Would this work the same for picture frames?

  • Lori Denise
    on Jul 10, 2018

    will this work with teeth? 😂

  • KDS
    on Jul 10, 2018

    Could I make the pieces, let it cure & then attach them?

    • Mike Macon
      on Jul 10, 2018

      Sure. You just need to be careful when removing from the mold.

    • Cresence
      on Jul 23, 2018

      Call me grammie... and brain cell challenged....(far out... dig it... groovy...etc...) it looks like THE exact pc I am needing. But what I am not understanding... ready?! How can molding the left be suddenly right.... as that wud SEEM to be flat when you flip it over... (after you fill the mold, that is still ‘left side ‘, is it not?!)

      and I am not planning on painting as I love the woood stain just as it is. How wud one manage that?!

      This was free... sitting on side of road... and with all that I see how it is constructed, it is old!!!! So I don’t want to ruin it for a 6-8inch pc of trim. (There is one crack along the bottom side that can easily be hidden w a plant or done thing. I love what people throw away as trash that turn out to be valuable, Bee U tee full works of art!!!!

      thanks for any advice!!!

      and fantastic job!!!

      keep on keepin’ on!!!!!!

  • Mary DiGiallonardo
    on Jul 10, 2018

    That was so cool to see! I wanted to say Farout, but I know that would have dated me. I have never seen that before! My question is; can you sand the top of that mold to make it just a tad smoother, before painting? How long will that new mold stay on the cabinet after you have prep it & painted? Can the cabinet be wiped down throughout the years wit a damp cloth, without damaging the mold? Or what would you recommend?

    MDG

    • Mike Macon
      on Jul 11, 2018

      To answer the questions: Can you sand the top of that mold to make it just a tad smoother, before painting? Yes. How long will that new mold stay on the cabinet after you have prep it & painted? Bondo is an adhesive and adheres to the wood. Can the cabinet be wiped down throughout the years wit a damp cloth, without damaging the mold? Yes it can. The paint and the topcoat chosen will protect it. Or what would you recommend? This method, it is stronger than putty or wood filler.

    • Betsy
      on Jul 14, 2018

      Come on Mary, go ahead and say 'Far out":) Remember when John Denver used to say, ad nauseam, "Far out, fantastic, I don't believe it!" Made me crazy:)

    • Mary L. Sutherland
      on Jul 20, 2018

      Ya Dig? I Dig It!

  • Marion7549
    on Jul 10, 2018

    How can I save this to my computer to refer to it at a later date?


    • Mike Macon
      on Jul 11, 2018

      File>Print>Select "Print as a PDF".... then save it to the folder you wish.

    • Elle
      on Jul 12, 2018

      You might screen capture it - OR email yourself the link too. And somebody give this man a medal. Outstanding.



    • Ft.29298732
      on Jul 12, 2018

      😊

    • Carey
      on Jul 30, 2018

      You can also go up to bookmarks and click on it. IT should show an option to add a bookmark. On my Apple, I have added a folder first that is for "Furniture repair/refin" and I can save to that folder when I add the bookmark. I would also suggest that if you want to keep it available even if your computer crashes, be sure to put it on either a CD/DVD or a flash drive if you create a PDF.

    • Linda R
      on Nov 27, 2018

      Or, if you don't want to save the pictures and other stuff...just the written directions, you can copy and paste each section onto a blank Word or other text type document (blank, unless you already have others and want to add to that file).

      Then just save as "Bondo trim repair, or whatever" and that's that!

      There, now you have at least four or five different ways to do it.

    • Bklynrn
      on Nov 27, 2018

      Bookmark it and save to HOME- then add furniture repair in the comments.

    • Steve Wolfhagen
      on Nov 28, 2018

      Cover it in Bondo and glue it to your computer screen.

    • Joy Wilson Sedgley
      on Nov 28, 2018

      😆😂😂

    • Dorothy Sittler
      on Nov 28, 2018

      Press the star on the upper right hand of your computer screen and press DONE. You could also copy and paste the link for this page on a Word Document and name it something you would recognize.

    • Dorothy
      on Nov 28, 2018

      Tap the heart next to "I want to do this!"

      To find it when you go to home talk page again you will see a circle on the top right with your initial in it.

      Tap the circle and you will find your saved items.

    • Carol
      on Nov 28, 2018

      if you can save this as a file take photos with your phone of each step & you’ll store these steps as photos not just text. You need the pictures as examples of the process.

  • Annette Gasperosky
    on Jul 25, 2018

    What if the trim is gone and there isn't any more just the out line on the project then how do I fix it?

    • Mike Macon
      on Jul 25, 2018

      That is much more of a creative challenge. If I had nothing to copy I probably would eliminate the detail all together.

    • Carey
      on Jul 30, 2018

      I would also eliminate that particular design too. You can look for molds and find one that would create a design that you like and make another one that way. http://hersite.info/affordable-french-furniture-appliques/

      This site gives a lot of info on different options and affordability of them.

      Look for something that you have that you can use for a replacement design and make your mold from that.

    • Mrh32812218
      on Nov 28, 2018

      If all of the trim, is missing with no images to allow you to mill a replica, the easiest fix is to buy an appropriate decorative wood molding and recreate a pattern/design that compliments the piece of furniture being restored.

  • Karla Dawe-Peterson
    on Nov 27, 2018

    Will the bondo accept stain?

  • Kathleen Granfeldt
    on Nov 28, 2018

    I had a piece of furniture refinished it is a antique white with the beading I’m gold it neeeds more gold can I use artmind gold paint brush on then streak by wiping off with a rag

  • Katrina
    on Nov 28, 2018

    How do you get rid of a water stain on a very old antique buffet without doing more damage ?

    • Jude
      on Nov 28, 2018

      Try mayo

    • Susan Bailey
      on Nov 28, 2018

      or walnuts/walnut oil and buff out. they also say a towel and a warm iron


    • Jan Arledge Leatherman
      on Nov 28, 2018

      Mayonnaise overnite

    • Doug
      on Nov 28, 2018

      I have used a heat gun to remove water stains out of old desks and it works well. I have seen videos where people have used irons but you can't see what is happening under an iron. With a heat gun you can heat the area then wipe with a cloth and repeat until the stain is totally gone. it doesn't matter if there is varnish on it or not. I use this method on all the stained desks in our office. I am sure you could even find another item with a stain and do trial run if you are unsure. Cheers!

    • Necee Marie
      on Nov 28, 2018

      Watco Rejuvenating Oil. This stuff is awesome!! Great for cleaning up any kinds of wood and will get out those water stains !! Just rub it on gently onyour piece of furniture with a piece of steel wool ( the softest) and make sure you do the whole thing. After about 10 minutes take it all off with a rag . And VOILA!! * use a rag that you can throw away . Let me know how this works out for you.

    • Sylvia Sethares-Heyl
      on Nov 28, 2018

      Great find. Thank you.

    • Mary M
      on Nov 28, 2018

      Mayonnaise. Instant, easy, smells good.

    • DC
      on Nov 28, 2018

      Cover the water stain with mayonnaise and allow to soak in. Should do the trick.

    • Katrina
      on Nov 30, 2018

      Are you people kidding ??? Mayonnaise?? I will try it cannot believe it !!! Thanks all

  • Jeanne
    on Nov 28, 2018

    Your furniture is stained but in your tutorial you state 'paint'. Can you stain?

    • Mike Macon
      on Nov 29, 2018

      Bondo does not accept the stain as wood does. If no notice, the finish product is painted.

  • Pat
    on Nov 28, 2018

    what is the best way to attach the bondo to the background?

    • Wendy Roithner
      on Nov 28, 2018

      She states in the directions that you fill the mold then press it into place. It bonds to the area where it is needed as it cures. Then you sand it smooth.

    • Mike Macon
      on Nov 28, 2018

      Wendy is correct. The bondo adheres directly to the wood. You could let it cure and then apply with a glue.

  • Penny
    on Nov 28, 2018

    Could you use wood putty?

  • Debbie Peters
    on Nov 28, 2018

    Many people asked about getting a water stain out of wood table top. Does anyone have a suggestion for getting out oil stains? Salad dressing cruet left on table and now there is a round oil stain left behind.

    • Elaine
      on Nov 28, 2018

      One part apple cider vinegar with three parts oil I use olive oil. Shake well and rub on with a soft cloth. Amazing how it works. I done a whole Jennie Lynn bed and wow the difference.

  • Judy Adams
    on Nov 28, 2018

    Can you stain bondo or only paint it? Have a wood I don't want to paint now what do I do?

    • Mike Macon
      on Nov 28, 2018

      That is a challenge. The bondo will not take the stain as with wood. So, you would have to get artistic with a detail brush. I wish it worked. I could resolve a lot of issues

    • V Valencia
      on Nov 28, 2018

      Unfortunately, even a new piece of wood shaped to repair a piece could be stained, but would not exactly match on an aged piece.


    • Frank Sherwood
      on Nov 28, 2018

      There are other versions of 'Bondo' that can take a stain before adding hardener to get a closer match. The closer t he color of the shaped piece, the less stain/paint needed

    • Bijous
      on Nov 28, 2018

      Hi. Consider using a gel stain. You will need to test on a test piece of Bondo. You may have to mix two or three colors together to achieve the right match, but it can be done. Happy DIY'ing!

    • Fay34273850
      on Nov 28, 2018

      Check what Joe Jones had to say. Maybe putty would be your best bet.

    • Eileen Walker
      on Nov 28, 2018

      Great tutorial! Thank you so much.

  • Merrily Clifford
    on Nov 28, 2018

    The top front corner of a dresser was damaged when dropped. Would this work when three sides would need to be filled? Thanks!

    • Mike Macon
      on Nov 28, 2018

      Yes, it is strong enough. I would create a boxed area around the corner, spray it with oil for easy release but do not get it in the area you are repairing.

    • Jewellmartin
      on Nov 28, 2018

      Although it might be about the same price at Lowe’s or Minards to buy wood or plastic paintable trim, one-fourth of the trim can make a mold for the other 3/4. And a hot glue mold is much easier to make than a resin mold, to me. Best wishes. ☺️

  • Marcia Harrison Jollensten
    on Nov 28, 2018

    Do you have a suggestion for doing a mirror image of the part that is intact?

    • Joe Jones
      on Nov 28, 2018

      You can do it this exact same way this is making an image of the part you have to replace the part that’s missing. You can melt the hot glue with an old nonstick pan or small crockpot even the chocolate melter makes for good tool to melt hot glue in bulk and pour it instead of the slow glue gun process.

    • Sassychero
      on Nov 28, 2018

      Using the same technique as instructed above, when you remove the glue you will then reveal your mold. Now use the Bondo as instructed above and simply attach as instructed to the side without the missing trim/area. Easy peasy!!

    • Joe Jones
      on Nov 28, 2018

      Also Durham’s water putty mixes with water it’s a powder and it turns into wood filler that acts like real wood can be drilled sanded and all. If you don’t want to use bondo.

    • Fay34273850
      on Nov 28, 2018

      Do you have the ratio to mix the putty. I have a piece of door ledge broken off and I think that would work. When you remove the the mold does the putty adhere to the wood?


  • Knit Wit
    on Nov 28, 2018

    Awesome tutorial and so easy! What did you use to clean the oil off?

    • Mike Macon
      on Nov 28, 2018

      It wipes away easily with a damp rag and a dab of Dawn Blue

    • Joe Jones
      on Nov 28, 2018

      Dawn is the best degreaser there is. It’s safe enough to use on sea birds during Exxon Valdez so it’s ok for home goods and strong enough for oil sludge.

    • Joe Jones
      on Nov 28, 2018

      Also if you are concerned about the oil you can use Talc or PVA (polyvinyl alcohol)

  • Fay34273850
    on Nov 28, 2018

    What kind of glue do you use to glue on the piece?

    • Ginger
      on Nov 28, 2018

      Article said.....Hot Glue and even showed glue gun in the photos

      but at home improvement stores or at Hobby stores

    • Trish
      on Nov 28, 2018

      I think the Bondo adheres with out glue. The glue was to make a mold.

  • Fay34273850
    on Nov 28, 2018

    Wonderful advice, I will use it on a Maple hutch that I am going to antique. Do you know how I can print your instructions?

    • Joann Felters
      on Nov 28, 2018

      If you’re on your computer/laptop, check the “file” icon at top-left to see if ‘print’ is a drop down option.

      If it is not an option, you can highlight the entire article, copy and paste into an email to yourself. Then you can print.

    • JohnHW
      on Nov 28, 2018

      First open "see all material" at button of article. Then using the left mouse button drag pointer down the article hilight it. While hilighted, to speed up the after paste clean up in your cut and paste hold down ctrl and using left mouse button click on each item that you don't need or want. Check the article to make sure that it remains hilighted. Release ctrl place your pointer on the hiighted area, use the right mouse button select copy. Now your are ready to paste into a text program, i.e. Microsoft word. Make sure the article has pasted correctly before closing this page. In your text program you can clean up what you don't want and print the article. You can also save the article to a file on your computer.

      I am sure you are probably aware of most of this. This also works 99% anywhere on the internet.

    • Fay34273850
      on Nov 28, 2018

      thank you both for your instructions on printing the articles I want.

  • Fay34273850
    on Nov 28, 2018

    The piece I have to copy is around 14" long and narrow, should I do in 2 or 3 pieces or will the bondo hold its shape after I remove the wax?

    • Edie
      on Nov 29, 2018

      No wax, hot glue is the mold. Do not remove the mold until Bondo hardens. Might want to try a practice piece on a sample board first...Bondo hardens fairly quickly.

    • Maureen
      on Nov 29, 2018

      I just did a piece that was about 7" long. It came out great but I had to sand to smooth it out. I ended up breaking it in half. It was no big deal because I was able to glue it back together with some SUper Glue. I do have a suggetion though. If your piece is deep enough, I would put some Bondo in, then a skewer or some toothpicks, and then more Bondo to encase the toothpicks.

    • Fay34273850
      on Nov 29, 2018

      thanks for your help

  • Fay34273850
    on Nov 28, 2018

    where do you get paper clay?


    • S
      on Nov 28, 2018

      Any craft store like Michael's, Hobby Lobby. It's Papier-mâché made with paper pulp



    • Barb
      on Dec 3, 2018

      Most craft stores

  • Joseph Albano
    on Nov 28, 2018

    can you use epoxy instead of bondo?

  • JohnandDonna Tomberlin
    on Nov 28, 2018

    Thank you. Will it work on old picture fames?

    • Donna Boyce
      on Nov 29, 2018

      I've used poly clay to make my mold. Bake. Thenfill with more poly clay carefully remove and bake then glue. I repaired old picture frames. It works well but his bondo idea looks like it works even better! I'll try that next time. Carefull on picture frames. The philagree is usually a plaster substance. Breaksand chip easily. Good luck.

    • Mike Macon
      on Nov 29, 2018

      I don't see why it wouldn't.

  • Janmcbeads
    on Nov 29, 2018

    I have two chairs that were my parents. They mean a great deal to me, their about 80 years old. All the glue is dried up and they need help. I just can’t throw them away. Please help

    • Khawkey
      on Nov 29, 2018

      Take them apart and re-glue them with a high quality wood glue. If you can't do that, then you could use metal re-enforcements that you could screw on, but that would ruin the antique nature of them.


      I don't think that this man's trim replacement idea is what you need as it is a different project.

    • Mike Macon
      on Nov 29, 2018

      There are some tutorials out there. To repair it would require dismantling and regluing and a serious amount of wood clamps. Seek a retired professional in your area.

  • Trudi
    on Nov 29, 2018

    Very cleaver. Thank you for posting. I have a 3 piece set of antique dressers, that need some help. Now they will get it. Have you tried this on a fennel? The one with the mirror has to posts on each side, and the top fennel on one side is broke off.

    • Mike Macon
      on Nov 29, 2018

      Finial? If that is what you mean, then yes. You may have to create a two-part mold to wrap around as needed.

    • Trudi
      on Nov 30, 2018

      Yes that is it Thank you. Spelling was never my strong point, and I had to really think to remember what the whatchmacallit was. LOL First of the new year, this is going to be my main project.

  • Fay34273850
    on Nov 29, 2018

    I have a door on my cabinet where the front part where the door closes is broken off, does bondo hold enough that I could put it there so there will not be a space when it is closed, it is 15" long and about 1/4 or 1/2" long

    • Mike Macon
      on Nov 29, 2018

      It should be plenty strong enough for wood. It is strong enough for cars. Just make sure there is good contact with the wood portion you are adhering to.

  • Rich
    on Nov 30, 2018

    do they have white bondo

  • Fay34273850
    on Nov 30, 2018

    I bought my bondo and the small tube of hardner that comes with it. The directions are almost impossible to read. All I can make out is for a golf ball size of filler use a 1-1/4"strip of hardner and mix well and before applying the hardner knead the tube of hardner very well before mixing it will the mix. It seems to be very toxic. I see you are not using gloves in the illistration but I was wondering if I should use nurses rubber gloves. Do I have the directions right? Can I use my hands to fill the mold? I have never used bondo before so should I make a couple of practice runs.

    • Mike Macon
      on Nov 30, 2018

      The math on the mix does not consider fixes like this that are small. My rule is "a dab to a dollop". I use a stir stick or plastic knife to work it. You have to work quickly. The minute you quit mixing it begins to set up. I use disposable gloves from Harbor Freight.

    • Mike Macon
      on Nov 30, 2018

      If you would like, you can contact me through my facebook page, Just Repurposed.

    • Gordo Gabacho
      on Nov 30, 2018

      Dipping out a golf ball size piece of filler and placing it on a scrap piece of cardboard seems fairly clear. The hardner comes out of the tube at a fairly consistent rate so think of it like putting toothpaste on a one and a half inch tooth brush, but put it on the cardboard near the filler. Stir until the two components are mixed together evenly then apply to the mold. It might be a good idea to use this first mix as a test mix. If it does not harden then you need a little more hardner.

    • Audrey
      on Dec 4, 2018

      Be sure your hands are covered. Not easy to get off. I use product in tube with no mixing

    • Fran Valente Lowell
      on Dec 5, 2018

      Mike... just a thought: seems like your directions are simple enough BUT, for those of us that follow them to a T and still doesn't come out right, where are you located? Don't be surprised if you start having people come to you to fix their "things". LOL. Great info.. thankyou so much. I do have a bureau missing this exact piece!!

    • Sandi Bunch Sossamon
      on Dec 5, 2018

      I never would have thought of this. Thanks !

    • Fay34273850
      on Dec 7, 2018


      thank you so much will follow your advice

  • Ticia
    on Nov 30, 2018

    So after it has been created, do you glue it to the missing area or should it be tacked with a finishing nail? Thank you for sharing; What a great tip.

    • Mike Macon
      on Nov 30, 2018

      The bondo adheres directly to the wood at the time you apply it. Then you sand away the overage.

    • Nicole Ann
      on Dec 5, 2018

      The bondo will hold it to whatever it is you are applying it to.

    • Gina
      on Dec 5, 2018

      you can use wood glue to glue it down too

    • Angie Lawrence
      on Dec 5, 2018

      i think when the bondo ures it sticks to the wood then the hot glue mold will come off

      reread it to be sure.


    • Denise Davenport
      on Dec 6, 2018

      So it would work if you filled the mold, let it cure and then glued the piece in place? Seems like less cleaning up excess bondo.

  • Wanda Barnes
    on Dec 5, 2018

    How do I come back too this page? There's no saving. I won't remember all that! lol .......



    • Judy
      on Dec 5, 2018

      Wanda, send it on your phones messages or email yourself. Just hit the arrow uptop or the chain link at the bottom to copy the link to your email.


    • Marinela Carbajal Medrano
      on Dec 5, 2018

      Can always do screen shots too

    • Teri Perrin
      on Dec 5, 2018

      On the bottom of my iphone, there is a square with an arrow pointing up. Hit it and choose where to send it. If you don’t use an iphone, sorry, can’t help you!😉

    • Lori Nunez
      on Dec 5, 2018

      You can print this or email it to yourself.

    • Tammie Prater
      on Dec 5, 2018

      I forward to myself in messenger to keep DIY ideas and recipes.

    • Jetta
      on Dec 7, 2018

      I went back and found it in my history or you could bookmark it

  • Shawna
    on Dec 5, 2018

    How hard would it be to do this but instead of painting match stain to the rest of my dresser. Its still in pretty good shape. Also does the hot glue pull off existing stain/varnish?

    • Patricia
      on Dec 5, 2018

      R

    • Mike Macon
      on Dec 5, 2018

      This technique is assuming you will paint. The excess bondo will need to be sanded and you will be sanding areas that are stained. Will it pull varnish/lacquer? That deepends on how well it isadhered to the piece itself.

    • Lisa Sobieski
      on Dec 6, 2018

      Instead of Bondo, use Water Putty (available at any hardware store) or wood filler. The secret to using wood filler is to make sure you buy a good one that is sandable and stainable. Also, try to mimick the grain of the wood using a pin...my next door neighbor was a woodworker, and used the pin trick when he refinished furniture. He was so good at it, once the piece was stained and varnished, you could not even tell the repair was made! Best of luck to you!

    • Joni Gilson Peterson
      on Dec 6, 2018

      If the oil got everywhere needed the glue won't damage anything. The oil will protect your finish.

    • Joni Gilson Peterson
      on Dec 6, 2018

      There is a rubber roller you can purchase where paint brushes are. It mimics wood grain as you roll and rock it over a painted or gel stained surface. It is so easy to use and it comes in different sizes.

    • Brenda Johnson
      on Dec 6, 2018

      You save it to Pinterest.

  • Jetta
    on Dec 7, 2018

    Yes ,I will be trying this, excellent info. I do have a question though. Will this work if I make a mold of right side trim and need a duplicate on the left side. If not how can I make it work?

  • Miss Emily Jo
    on Dec 10, 2018

    well, I got the mold made from the hot glue for the missing filigree on antique headboard, (worked GREAT!) but what kind of auto bondo do you recommend? There are all kinds available, and I only need couple of tablespoons...thanks!

    • Mike Macon
      on Dec 11, 2018

      Sadly you can't just buy a couple of teaspoons. You do not have to mix the whole container, just dip out what you need.

    • Sandra Ross Warren
      on Dec 31, 2018

      Wonder if you could just use wood filler (maybe mixed with sawdust) , it comes in small pints.

    • V Smith
      on Dec 31, 2018

      Buy the Bondo, keep it sealed and it will be good for a long time. There is no end to the uses you will find for this stuff. It is so easy to use and it it sands beautifully and it is stronger than waterbased woodfillers.

  • Kay Cloninger Kirby
    on Dec 31, 2018

    Could you use plaster of paris to do this instead of bondo

    • Jim Beaty
      on Dec 31, 2018

      Yes, you could.... however, the mould will be quite brittle and easily break. Clear silicone and corn starch also makes an excellent (flexible) mould.

    • Trish F
      on Jan 1, 2019

      I don't think she is looking for something different to make the mold out of but a different compound to make the actual replacement piece.


      Kay Kirby:

      PoP might work but you may have a more difficult time matching the color of the replacement piece and, in this case, the cabinet

    • Julie Banks
      on Jan 1, 2019

      Surely if she's going to paint over it,it shouldn't really matter if she uses the bondo or the pop?

    • Marqueta Wehunt
      on Jan 7, 2019

      I'm thinking plaster is going to draw moister so it wouldn't hold up. But wood filler might be a substitute for bondo .

    • Timothy Bennett
      on Feb 17, 2019

      I would not think so. Plaster of Paris is much diffent than auto bondo. If I am not mistaken Plaster of Paris would go soggy when trying to apply anything wet.

  • Debra Perry
    on Dec 31, 2018

    I understand the process, wondering what to do to stain not paint. My parents bed is missing sections of large beading in various places. I love the wood color so I don't want to paint. would love to have any suggestions.

    • Carra Trammell
      on Dec 31, 2018

      I have not done this but try paint a brown tone close to your project then staining or antiquing it to match. Maybe ???

    • Anne Mullen Chlovechok
      on Dec 31, 2018

      Wonder if it would be possible to stain the bondo before putting it in the mold?


    • Trudy
      on Dec 31, 2018

      What if you painted only the trim an accent color, not the whole thing?

    • Nancy
      on Dec 31, 2018

      I wonder if stainable wood putty would work in place of the Bondo?

    • Trish F
      on Jan 1, 2019

      Anne: I don't think you can do that as it would change the chemical composition of the bondo. Unless they have colorants specifically made to mix with the bondo.


      You could try a sample piece to see if it works before attempting the actual

      project.

    • Debra Perry
      on Jan 1, 2019

      Thanks for your comment

    • Sewstar
      on Jan 2, 2019

      We have made repairs to wood furniture using wood epoxy putty and then painted the repaired area using acrylic paints to match the finish color of the piece. It usually requires several colors blended together and then go over it with varnish or acrylic lacquer spray. Even if the color isn't perfect, it just blends with the rest of the piece and becomes unnoticable. I think you could use the same painting techinique with this bondo repair.

    • Shannon Greeno
      on Jan 4, 2019

      Try adding stain into the mold first or find paintable bondo and stain it??

    • Lisa
      on Jan 7, 2019

      I suppose you could but I think it would be very difficult to separate. You would have to sand the hole trim without affecting the faceplate

    • Marqueta Wehunt
      on Jan 7, 2019

      Wood putty comes in different colors and can be sanded .

    • Alaine
      on Jan 14, 2019

      Bondo is paintable. It’s used to fix cars

    • Kelly
      on Feb 5, 2019

      I wanted to apply stain to plastic to match wood and I just painted it with a paint that would stick to the plastic (kilz) then gel stained the painted plastic.... it has held great. You can actually get nice graining with multiple layers of gel stain application.

    • Deborah Perry Blankenship
      on Feb 7, 2019

      Hey Debra Perry, my maiden name was Deborah Perry. Any relatives come from CT?

    • Debra Perry
      on Feb 7, 2019

      Nope,sorry. Perry is my married name. Finch was my maiden name. Have fun DIYing.

    • Mireles_alma
      on Feb 23, 2019

      just paint the bond mold trim replacements to match the other trim.

    • Khaki
      on May 25, 2019

      I’m wondering how strong this type of mold is? Or if there is another substance I could fill the mold with that might hold up to some weight on top of it. I have a lamp that has a broken piece full of filigree just order where the glass of the (glass) “shade” sits. Like a torches lamp but older, prettier, and ornate. Don’t know how to replace the broken section...


      This technique seems like it might be an option. Or maybe a 3D printer?

  • Gail
    on Feb 16, 2019

    Have a question about a different projection, I have a teak kitchen table that has some water stains also some discolored portions any ideas. Thanks , Gail

    • Mike Macon
      on Feb 17, 2019

      There is no telling what is the stain. Teak is a very Porous wood if it has not been oiled. Rings will be a challenge to remove. Seek out through a search and you will surely get some responses as to what you need to do. I would suggest adding a few images of the areas of concern so those with and answer can relate to you problems.

    • Victoria Holliday
      on Mar 29, 2019

      Sand and re-stain?


    • Carol-Ann
      on Apr 5, 2019

      I had water stains as well as an area where something hot was placed on it. I used white toothpaste on these areas. Apply and rub and rub and rub with a soft cloth. It removed all stains and you can't even see where I had the problem.

  • Michele
    on Apr 13, 2019

    Could the bondo be mixed with some of the wood sawdust to make a stainable surface?

  • Khaki
    on May 25, 2019

    m wondering how strong this type of mold is? Or if there is another substance I could fill the mold with that might hold up to some weight on top of it. I have a lamp that has a broken piece full of filigree just order where the glass of the (glass) “shade” sits. Like a torches lamp but older, prettier, and ornate. Don’t know how to replace the broken section...


    This technique seems like it might be an option. Or maybe a 3D printer?


    • Leslie
      on May 25, 2019

      Khaki, I have been using Apoxie Sculpt for years to repair basically everything. You can get it online or Google it to see who sells it near you. It is a two part putty that you have to mix very well and have plenty of time to work with it. I also use water to smooth it out and it can be sanded, painted, glued and I think stained. The description should tell you about applications. You can also go to the home page to get more info and ask questions, Good luck.

    • Mike Macon
      on May 29, 2019

      Bondo is strong enough for cars, why not a lamp?

  • Toni
    on May 25, 2019

    Best way to paint upholstery.

  • Gidget
    on May 25, 2019

    I have an antique picture frame this will be perfect for! Did you consider using wood putty instead of bondo?

    • Mike Macon
      on May 29, 2019

      I find that wood putty shrinks too much. Bondo does not shrink.

    • Jimmy
      on Jun 1, 2019

      Not to mention, the time it would take for the wood filler to cure. Wood filler is air dried and would take hours to dry. Bondo has a chemical reaction and cures within minutes.

    • Kathy
      on Jun 11, 2019

      Great idea. Im wondering if you could use some air dry clay or something similar to do this.

    • Tj A
      on Jun 15, 2019

      Simplest answer is to try it. You have little to lose. Air dry clay is very "delicate", meaning it will not take kindly to bumps and such, so factor that in. If it is a picture frame that gets touched by little more than a feather duster, I'd say yes. If it is a furniture moulding, it probably will not be worth the time. Might want to practice how it releases from the mold before getting too invested.

  • Sue
    on May 27, 2019

    Can the new piece be stained instead of painting?

    • Mike Macon
      on May 27, 2019

      Bondo does not accept stain. It would be a challenge to blend it in.

    • April
      on Oct 2, 2019

      Sue, you can find some acrylic paints that mimic wood stains and can be used on any surface, even metal and plastic. It takes some practice, but I have used it for years in my scale miniatures.

    • Regina
      on Oct 11, 2019

      No because it is Bondo not wood. You can try to paint using colors that are like the stained pieces but that is a faux finish and would require some skill

  • Debbie Ventimiglia
    on Jun 1, 2019

    This is ingenious! I applaud you on this inspired fix. Great job!

  • Caroleculver2016
    on Sep 23, 2019

    Can I use plastic wood instead of Bondi on this

    • Mike Macon
      on Sep 24, 2019

      I am not sure if the plastic wood will release from the hot glue mold. Maybe if you lined the mold with some cooking spray like PAM

  • Shuggs
    on Mar 1, 2020

    Do you need to spray pam in the mold before you put the bondo in??

    • Tara Wilson
      on Mar 1, 2020

      I would guess not since it doesn’t say to. I bet it doesn’t really stick to the dried hot glue and I also believe there is pam already in the mold from area that was sprayed to make the mold?

    • Mike Macon
      on Mar 2, 2020

      No. The mold is flexible and can be peeled away after the bondo has set.

  • Georgia Poulos
    on Mar 2, 2020

    I have a mirror that is missing the opposite side so it needs to be reversed. Any suggestions?

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