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Alicia W
Alicia W
  • Hometalker
  • Middletown, PA

Antiquing a Faux Mirror

4 Materials
$7
2 Hours
Easy

I love the look of antiques, especially mirrors but most true antique mirrors are quite expensive. I found a way to get the antique look and not spend half a fortune.
antiquing a faux mirror
I also have a "thing" about old windows so I thought why not incorporate my two loves - mirrors and windows - into one project.
antiquing a faux mirror
I began by flipping the window onto with the wrong side facing up. Which is the "wrong side" of a window? That would be a personal preference. This window had some hardware on it and I wanted that to show on the right side.
Next I used painter's tape and covered the entire window frame.

You could also do this project using the glass from a picture frame. You would use the same steps.
antiquing a faux mirror
I used thinner painter's tape and covered each window sash.
antiquing a faux mirror
Next I mixed equal parts of vinegar and water and put it into a spray bottle. You can use white vinegar - I didn't have any on hand so I used apple cider.
antiquing a faux mirror
I shook up the vinegar/water mixture and then sprayed it onto each window pane. I tried to spray large drops of water not a fine mist.
antiquing a faux mirror
Once all the window panes were sprayed with vinegar/water and while it was still wet, I sprayed each pane with Krylon "Looking Glass" spray paint. I gave each pane two coats of paint.
antiquing a faux mirror
Using a paper towel, I gently dabbed each window pane removing the paint where the vinegar/water had been sprayed. (The paint will not adhere to the glass where it was sprayed.) I had to do this fairly quickly before the vinegar/water mixture dried.
antiquing a faux mirror
Once the paint was dry, I removed all of the painter's tape.
antiquing a faux mirror
Using black craft paint, I painted over the "looking glass" paint.
antiquing a faux mirror
As you can see, the black paint shows through where the "looking glass" paint was removed - giving you an antique look.
antiquing a faux mirror
I added two screws and picture wire to the back and hung my new "antique" mirror on the wall. Love the chippiness of the window and love the mirror affect.
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Have a question about this project?

3 of 12 questions
  • Jad5375777
    on Jul 14, 2018

    How in the world did you get this to work? Have gone thru 18 panes of glass, clean in each 3 x before spraying with anything. All the paint did was cloud up into a huge mess. Have given up on this mirror project. Have gone thru 6 cans of expensive paint and 18 glass panes. Will order new mirrors to complete my project. I don't give up easily but this just did not work!

    • Alicia W
      on Jul 28, 2018

      Sorry if the directions were confusing to everyone. You have to have larger drops of water/vinegar not a mist on the window before spraying the paint. You also have to let the paint dry (a few seconds) before dabbing off the water/vinegar.

  • Shuganne
    on Jul 14, 2018

    Oh, dear, sorry, Alicia, but the worrywort in me is concerned about the chipping old paint. Did you test to see if it had lead? Did you use steel wool, using a dust mask, to take off the loose pieces? I love the look of the old mirror effect, so please reassure me it's safe! It's a gorgeous project and I'm so inspired you shared with us!

    • Alicia W
      on Aug 30, 2018

      Hi Shuganna. As Patti said, lead is not a problem unless ingested. I did not sand the window/remove any paint from the window so there wasn’t any paint particles in the air so no dust mask.

      If chips of paint fell off, I just threw them away. Thank you for the concern.

  • Renee Rippetoe
    on Jul 20, 2018

    Was there lead-based paint on the window frame? That's where it's most commonly used.

    • Alicia W
      on Aug 30, 2018

      Hi Renee. Lead isn’t a problem unless ingested or inhaled. I did not remove any paint from the window so there was no ingesting or inhaling paint. If this is a concern, you can apply a clear sealer to the window beforehand.

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