How do I care for Peony bushes?

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The flowers have bloomed and dropped their petals. What do I do now. This is my first time with these plants

  5 answers
  • Jan Marie Jan Marie on Aug 29, 2018

    Cut the spent flower head and stalk off after it is done blooming. In the fall cut back to the ground. It will regrow next year.

  • Grahame Grahame on Aug 29, 2018

    Here is a link about the Peony Bushes, I hope it helps

    https://www.whiteflowerfarm.com/how-to-grow-peonies-paeonia

  • Amanda Amanda on Aug 29, 2018

    Hello Susan. I cut off the dead blooms just to make the plants look better. Then in fall before the frost I cut them back.

  • Susan Schaal McRae Susan Schaal McRae on Aug 29, 2018

    Thank you


  • Grahame Grahame on Aug 29, 2018

    Cutting Flower Buds: To enjoy the blooms of Herbaceous Peonies later in the summer, cut the buds just before they open on stems about 6 inches long. Lightly wet the inside of a large, resealable plastic bag, and place the buds inside. Close the bag and place it in your refrigerator (not the freezer). Later take out the buds you need and float them in a shallow bowl of water. When bud is about ⅓ open, lift it, then cut the stem to 1½ inches long and refloat the bud.

    Companions: Peonies flower with Roses and Clematis and are lovely with many other perennials; be sure to leave room around the plants for air circulation. White-flowered Peonies are entrancing against a background of evergreens. Spring-flowering bulbs such as Crocus vernus or Scilla sibericacreate a pleasing color contrast at the feet of emerging Herbaceous Peonies stems, which are often reddish.

    Reflowering: Many varieties make several side buds that will open after the terminal bloom flowers, so deadheading is beneficial. After each flower is finished, cut the stem underneath the old bloom, leaving the foliage alone. If exhibition-sized flowers are desired, remove the side buds as they form and leave only the terminal bud.

    Dividing/Transplanting: Generally Herbaceous Peonies do not need dividing and some resent it. However, if you must move an established plant you need to divide it before replanting. Do this in the fall, after all foliage has died back completely. Each division should have three to five eyes, and it will usually take a couple of years for the new plants to flower.

    End-of-Season Care: Foliage of Herbaceous Peonies should be cut back in the fall and removed from the premises to discourage overwintering of pests. Mulch new plants with evergreen bows or salt marsh hay after the ground freezes.

    Calendar of Care

    Early Spring: Water plantings well if spring rains don't do it for you. Side dress plants with compost or aged manure. If botrytis blight was present the previous season, cover ground around plant with a thin (one-quarter inch) layer of sand and spray new shoots with Bordeaux mix or lime sulphur. Set stakes or other supports in place now.

    Mid-Spring: Watch for signs of botrytis blight and treat as needed, removing any diseased tissue immediately. Train through plant supports as plants grow. Remove side buds if exhibition-size blooms are desired.

    Late Spring: Deadhead Peonies religiously and remove all fallen petals or blooms from the garden.

    Summer: Herbaceous Peonies do best with an inch of water a week.

    Fall: Cut stems of Herbaceous Peonies back to soil level and remove from the area. Dig and divide plants now if necessary. Mulch new plantings with evergreen boughs or salt marsh hay after the ground freezes.