Farmhouse Backsplash Makeover on a Budget

8 Materials
$0
5 Hours
Medium

Backsplash Makeover on a Budget

Looking for a creative, inexpensive way to update your kitchen backsplash? Got leftover vinyl plank flooring?

Free backsplash using leftover vinyl flooring

If you have ever laid a vinyl plank floor and saved the left-over pieces this might be for you. I have 4 boxes of left-over flooring taking up space and every time I have to move them to get to something else, I swear I’m going to throw them away but never do. Glad I didn’t!


This vinyl flooring is the type with a faux wood grain texture, so it is perfect to give the look of wood. It is thin, flexible and easily cuts by scoring it with a utility knife.

Boring Before

What you will need:


  • Leftover flooring, or get a box of laminate flooring at your local hardware store. I used Allure ironwood vinyl flooring.
  • Nail gun, I’m in love with my cordless Ryobi.
  • Nails
  • Utility knife
  • Straight edge ruler
  • White Ice Shabby Paints
  • Sand paper
  • Spray bottle of water

Install

Remove all plug/switch covers and prep the area. Measure your first piece and mark any outlets that need to be cut out.

Use a utility knife to cut for outlets.

Use a utility knife to score and cut your vinyl pieces.

Cut around plugs and nail.

Apply using your nail gun. Continue until your entire backsplash is done.

We're making progress :)

Ready for paint!


Paint

Paint with one coat of White Ice, let dry.

Wet sanding to reveal the wood grain

Wet Sand

Spray sections with water and sand while wet to show the grain texture. (don’t spray water near outlets). You can wet your sanding sponge first and tape over the outlets.


Wet sanding is a great way to distress a strong paint. Some paints come off easier than others and spraying with water helps to weaken the paints adhesion long enough to help remove enough to show the faux grain. It also helps cut down on dust.

Only took 12 years to get my backsplash ;)

Finish

Safely extend your outlets to fit flush with your new backsplash.. If you aren’t comfortable with this ask for help.

Set back and enjoy your inexpensive backsplash!

faux wood look


Enjoy!

Another angle of the after


Farmhouse backsplash complete!

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To see more: https://www.shabbypaints.com/backsplash-makeover-on-a-budget/

Have a question about this project?

35 questions
  • Betty Jo Buchanan Betz
    on Jan 10, 2019

    What color are the cabinets?

  • Bonbon
    on Jan 11, 2019

    Yes, I rent apartment, so I can't nail, paint or glue. What's out there to use?

    • Diane
      on Jan 11, 2019

      You can always get peel and stick vinyl plank flooring. It just peels back up, which is good because when I moved a freezer I damaged a piece. I just pulled it up and replaced it. I used it in my basement laundry room on a concrete floor and I love it! It was so easy to work with. The product I used was called 'Stayplace' by Allure.


    • Dma5733110
      on Jan 11, 2019

      Contact paper, the kind you can peel back off.

  • Diane
    on Jan 11, 2019

    Great job! I was thinking of doing the same thing but was going to buy a box in a colour I liked. Now I think I'll use my leftover self adhesive vinyl plank flooring and do a finish just like you did. This came at a perfect time! I only wonder if it can be used behind a stove. I can't see it being fire resistant. Anyone know?

    • Shabby Paints
      on Jan 11, 2019

      Thanks Diane. It's as fire resistant as your drywall. :) Is there a standard on what goes behind a stove for fire prevention? I'm not aware because mine is in the center of an island. If your concerned about cleaning I've so far easily wiped off coffee and some unknown stains. It's made to be a floor should take a good beating.

  • Marie
    on Jan 11, 2019

    My painter applied sheets of mini tiles to my back splash. Can I safely remove them myself? If so, where do I begin?

    Thank you.

  • Kristine Field
    on Jan 11, 2019

    Did you seal it at all. Also what is behind the stove?

  • How did you cover the edge?

    • Kathy Haines Cramer
      on Jan 11, 2019

      In the one photograph, it shows the edge butting up against a door molding.

    • Shabby Paints
      on Jan 11, 2019

      I got very lucky I started at the door trim and ended up against a pantry cabinet. It got tricky around the trim of my window but finally got the odd shape cut out with my utility knife :)

    • Great I do love the look of the vinyl planks, so easy to work with! Great job!


    • Shabby Paints
      on Jan 11, 2019

      Thanks..got one more box in another color..got to use it :)

  • Ursula Viola
    on Jan 11, 2019

    is vinyl safe behind the stove area? I would think that it would melt.

    • Sandy Boston Morritt
      on Jan 11, 2019

      I am curious about this too... so am following your question...

    • Mary schwartz
      on Jan 11, 2019

      Me too!!!

    • Vicky Thomas
      on Jan 11, 2019

      I think only if you actually touched it with a very hot pan or something, but for normal cooking, I dont think so...

    • Ellen
      on Jan 11, 2019

      Ursula, if you look closely at the picture above the word install, you will see no stove. I think that is on another wall so no possibility of anything melting.

    • Vicky Thomas
      on Jan 11, 2019

      Wait, I dont even see a stove...perhaps its in the island. So I do not see an issue with melting.

    • Shabby Paints
      on Jan 11, 2019

      It's in the island, I can't imagine it handling hot pans or grease any difference than peel and stick backsplashes or tin type backsplashes. Some are made of plastic to look like tile. I have also seen damaged subway tile that didn't ever come completely clean. It would be easy to replace if you had a fire.

  • Sandy Boston Morritt
    on Jan 11, 2019

    OK...I have been looking for a solution for our kitchen and this is perfect.. In fact, we are starting this weekend. I too have a question about the vinyl behind the stove? What are your thoughts? And also how to cover the exposed ends? Can't wait to do this !!! Thank you...

    • Baxter
      on Jan 11, 2019

      No problem at all with the vinyl behind the stove---I installed vinyl flooring tiles as a backsplash 2 years ago and no problem (I cook a LOT!). For the ends, I bought a narrow decorative wood (carved rope look) moulding piece, cut it to size and finished it to match the vinyl, and tacked/glued it at the ends.

  • Sharon Gehrke Wolf
    on Jan 11, 2019

    Beautiful! I have a question about your peacock plate, where did you get it? It is amazing!

  • Alvin L
    on Jan 11, 2019

    If you knew you was going to paint and sand the vinyl flooring why didn’t you do it before putting it up?

    I think I would because it would eliminate the problem of water near the outlets and dust. It also would be in my opinion easier to sand on a flat table surface instead of sanding in between the counter and cabinets. All in all looks great.

    • Patti
      on Jan 11, 2019

      I agree with you, Al. Easier on the back, arms & neck, too 🥴

    • Jill Ron Pike
      on Jan 11, 2019

      It might SEEM easier to paint and sand the flooring before putting it up, but then you'd have to go back and redo it once it was up to camouflage the nails used for install, anyway. No sense in doing something twice.

    • Alvin L
      on Jan 11, 2019

      @ Patti I agree work smarter not harder.

    • Alvin L
      on Jan 11, 2019

      @ Jill Ron Pike a very tiny nail hole is much easier to touch up then dealing with fighting sanding in between the counter and cabinet. Also less clean up of dust. I am assuming it’s a finishing nail so the nail is tiny just use a tiny paint brush for painting on canvas will work to hide the nail.

      Thats just my opinion

      Thanks you for commenting have a great day.


    • Cathy Hays
      on Jan 11, 2019

      I disagree , because you want to distress over several planks next to each other. in other words across a few of them touching each other. otherwise I think it would look choppy and not smooth between the different planks.

    • Shabby Paints
      on Jan 11, 2019

      It wasn't hard at all Seriously painted and sanded in less than 30 min. I never know what I'm going to do, it's something that you have to see to know.

    • Patti
      on Jan 13, 2019

      So lay the planks down horizontally & end-to-end, sand & distress the entire thing WHILE ITS HORIZONTAL then when it’s dry/finished mount it to the wall.


      It’s so nice that we each can do this project our own way 🙏🏼 Namaste 🙏🏼

    • Patti
      on Jan 13, 2019

      Once again, Al ... I agree with you.

      Tiny nail holes are easy peasy to camouflage. But nice that everyone can do this project however they decide.

    • Alvin L
      on Jan 15, 2019

      @ Cathy Hays I do understand that you want a consistent look of distressed. If you ever used marble tile you lay out the look before you start using them to get the look that you want. I would have laid out the vinyl like I was going to put it up paint them, when dry sand them while they were laid out. But that’s how I would do it. I’m a perfectionist so that’s my thought process of how I would do it. For me this works and seems easier. Honestly there is no just one way of doing it. That was the way I would have gone about doing it. I wasn’t trying to come off as saying something negative about how it was done just was trying to offer a easier way of doing it in my opinion.

    • Alvin L
      on Jan 15, 2019

      @ Patti Yes I agree there is no one right way to do it. My comment was my way of doing it. It may not be the best way for someone else. I didn’t mean to come off like it was done wrong if that’s how it came off I apologize for that because that wasn’t my intention.

    • Patti
      on Jan 17, 2019

      @Al ... no apology to me is necessary. I also tend to be perfectionist/do it right or notatall type. I would totally do it the same way you do.


      I always consider “directions” to be mere “suggestions” ... like “salt/season to your own personal preference”. 😉

  • Crystal Nielsen
    on Jan 11, 2019

    Did you paint your cabinets yourself as well? If so, what color/paint brand did you use? I love it!

  • With so many styles and colors..why paint?

  • Faye Muir West
    on Jan 11, 2019

    So Where did you get that chicken, and is it a cookie container or just deco. Good job on backsplash.

  • Susan
    on Jan 12, 2019

    Where is the peacock plate on the counter from?

  • Pansy
    on Jan 12, 2019

    The paint used on the backsplash, is it washable? Do you think it would benefit to have a protective coating since it could be splashed with oil, food, etc.? I love the look, it's beautiful. Nice job.

    • Shabby Paints
      on Jan 12, 2019

      It's the same paint on my shop sink counter, bathroom walls, etc. Cleans great.

  • Virginia zacharias
    on Jan 17, 2019

    Just a comment, wouldn't it have been easier to do the sanding and painting before installation, realize some touch up would be necessary but seems to me would save a big mess.

    • Shabby Paints
      on Jan 17, 2019

      No with all the cuts and waste it would have taken longer. It took 20 min to paint and sand.

  • Amie
    on Jan 18, 2019

    Can you use laminate ( not vinyl) flooring?

  • Penny Parker
    on Jan 18, 2019

    Were there gaps in between The different sections? If so, would they need to be filled with caulk? I love this project, it seems like something I can really do myself.

  • Yolanda Nunez Taylor
    on Jan 18, 2019

    How do you get your husband to let you try your Idea? Besides locking him up and putting Ducked tape on his mouth!😂🤪

  • Cindyloo Ryan
    on Jan 18, 2019

    This couldn't have been used behind Stove top?

  • JenHorrocks
    on Jan 18, 2019

    Could it be used behind a gas cooktop? Love it

  • Sherlene
    on Jan 18, 2019

    Can you put it behind a top gas stove

    • Sally
      on Jan 18, 2019

      I'd be cautious about putting any vinyl materials behind a heat source.

    • Shabby Paints
      on Jan 18, 2019

      I don't see why not, check with your flooring manufacturer.

  • Grace Lafferty-Schnick
    on Jan 18, 2019

    When I read the scrap flooring, I pictured mixing different colors on the floor? You know how habitat

    only has two boxes of this one of that

    • Kym
      on Jan 18, 2019

      So did I Grace. And I preferred my visual 😉

    • Shabby Paints
      on Jan 19, 2019

      If that's what you have use it. Keeps it out of the landfill 😊

  • Melissa K Henry
    on Jan 18, 2019

    Why would you paint it ? Could you leave the uncoated


    • Shabby Paints
      on Jan 18, 2019

      It was too dark and looked like vinyl before it was painted.

    • Nancy
      on Jan 18, 2019

      I like the idea only I would have chose a different color. Looks nice only not my color.

  • Kimm King
    on Jan 18, 2019

    Why wouldn't you just paint the backstop? You could do an antique rub and get the same effect. Yours does look very nice! Thank you☺

  • Nancy Koch
    on Jan 18, 2019

    Could you have sanded and painted prior to putting it up? Seems like it would have been easier

    • Nancy
      on Jan 18, 2019

      That sounds easier

    • Shabby Paints
      on Jan 18, 2019

      Nope would have been a huge time waster because of all the waste and cuts. Took 20 min to paint and sand.

  • Deanette Dee Bloom
    on Jan 18, 2019

    Could you use wood look porcelain tile planks or does it need to be vinyl

  • Jennifer
    on Jan 18, 2019

    Do you have any nifty ideas on tin tiles

  • Sari
    on Jan 20, 2019

    I have dark walnut cabinets , don't want to change cabinets color, what color would you use to paint walls


    • Shabby Paints
      on Jan 21, 2019

      Can you share a picture of your kitchen, what's your style and do you get a lot of natural light?

  • Judy
    on Jan 22, 2019

    After sanding do you put any kind of sealer on it

  • Diane Shewmaker Barrow
    on Jan 22, 2019

    Did you remove old tiles before putting the flooring up?

  • Nathan Coleman
    on Jan 26, 2019

    I thought of doing this myself with no painting for sanding but I read on the box at home Depot vinyl planks are not meant to use vertically like on a wall I don't know why it would mention that I wonder if maybe they're highly flammable?

    • Shabby Paints
      on Jan 27, 2019

      It's because the glue isn't that strong, so I used a nail gun.

    • Deborah
      on Feb 19, 2019

      I used a hammer with small gold finishing nails. I love it!

    • Penny-Marie
      on Mar 3, 2019

      I wasn't thinking about the glue used to fasten them on with just more about that they are vinyl which I thought would be flammable. So many people have these solid stove tops now with no backing on them so the heat will get to the wall easier. I have that right now In the apt. & hate it.

    • Lisa Swanson
      on Mar 27, 2019

      i think they were installed horizontally!!

    • Michael
      on Apr 7, 2019

      Hello Nathan. The reason why it's on the box is because vinyl may not be flammable, but it could melt if behind the stove. I'm not saying Wicked witch of the west melt but enough to warp. I don't know if electric stove's will affect it this way but a gas flame will. But we're talking way up high and really really hot. And heated up hot enough, even no damage is apparent, it could release toxic vapors. But as a back splash everywhere else, should not be a problem. Just not behind the stove.

  • Billi Young
    on Jan 29, 2019

    I absolutely LOVE your peacock bowl shown in one of your pics. Can you plz tell me more about it? Did u make it? How? It looks hand painted but yet EXTREMELY vibrant. Lol just curious!. Thanx

  • Angela Williams Lewis
    on Apr 6, 2019

    dont you need to put a finish on it? i would think if you dont the chalk paint would come off.

    • Shabby Paints
      on Apr 6, 2019

      I can't speak for other chalk type paints but once dry, it's good to go. My shop exterior is painted with it and not sealed. Painted it over 4 years ago.

  • Jennifer Brandhorst
    on Apr 30, 2019

    What did you do between the window trim and the cupboards?

Join the conversation

4 of 71 comments
  • Rosemarie Abrahamson
    on Apr 6, 2019

    i have fake brick up now but its been up for years. this would be a nice change

  • Charise.
    on Dec 31, 2019

    This look very nice! I just can't understand why you didn't prepare the tiles (wetting, sanding, painting) before securing them to the wall.

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