Rhonda B
Rhonda B
  • Hometalker
  • Muscatine, IA

Moving a Leafed Out Hosta With the Help of a Belt and Some Tape


Denial-that is what I am in every time I plant a Hosta. I know it is going to grow and get big I just don't believe it at the time. This is probably because I usually purchase bare root Hosta from online retailers and they usually have only a few leaves and 1 or 2 eyes (eyes are what growers call a Hosta division). They seem so small that when I go to plant them I lose all sense and end up putting them where I will eventually have to move them.
hosta moving leafed how to, gardening, how to, perennial
Here are a couple of examples of some small Hosta I planted that will eventually be very large (given time): Here is Hosta "Liberty" which I planted last year. It is hard to believe from her size right now she will eventually be 6 feet wide.
hosta moving leafed how to, gardening, how to, perennial
So this denial leads to my Summer ritual which involves moving these beasts to a more appropriate position in the garden without setting them back too much. Using a pitchfork loosens the roots without cutting them like a shovel would do. The tape helps to make digging and moving it easier and also keep the Hosta leaves upright so the roots can pump water up the stems.
What you will need for this:
1. A pitchfork or perennial fork-I prefer to use a pitch fork to move my plants I feel it causes less damage to the plants roots than using a shovel
2. A shovel to dig a new hole
3. Masking tape or painter's tape
4. An old belt with a D ring (or a piece of rope)
hosta moving leafed how to, gardening, how to, perennial
Steps to move the Hosta:
1. Dig a hole where the Hosta is going to go or prepare a container for the Hosta.
2. Take the belt (or rope) and place it around the bottom of the Hosta:
hosta moving leafed how to, gardening, how to, perennial
hosta moving leafed how to, gardening, how to, perennial
3. Now pull the belt (or rope) up around the stems of the plant:
hosta moving leafed how to, gardening, how to, perennial
Pull it tight enough to hold the stems and leaves up-as tight as possible without breaking the stems or leaves.
hosta moving leafed how to, gardening, how to, perennial
4. When it is tight enough tie it off. If a couple leaves escape that's OK:-))
5. Get the tape out and run the tape sticky side out around the Hosta either above or below the belt-I prefer above to keep the leaves in a tight bunch.
hosta moving leafed how to, gardening, how to, perennial
6. Wrap the tape around 3 or 4 times. When you have taped the Hosta you can release the belt and remove it.
hosta moving leafed how to, gardening, how to, perennial
7. Now grab your pitchfork. Shove it in the ground around the base of the Hosta and wiggle it back and forth (up and down) where you inserted it in the soil. This is to loosen the roots from the soil. Do this all the way around the base of the Hosta.
hosta moving leafed how to, gardening, how to, perennial
7. Now grab your pitchfork. Shove it in the ground around the base of the Hosta and wiggle it back and forth (up and down) where you inserted it in the soil. This is to loosen the roots from the soil. Do this all the way around the base of the Hosta.
hosta moving leafed how to, gardening, how to, perennial
8. Knock off extra dirt by dropping it a couple of times in the hole.
9. Now place it in the hole that you have dug making sure you are planting it at the same depth it was at.
10. Backfill the hole with dirt and water well:
hosta moving leafed how to, gardening, how to, perennial
11. Keep well watered until the Hosta becomes established in it's new home. Leave the tape on for a few weeks (until it loosens)-it will help keep the Hosta leaves upright while the Hosta recovers from the move.
hosta moving leafed how to, gardening, how to, perennial
Here is a picture of Hosta "Honeybells" that I moved about a week ago. You will notice how the tape keeps the leaves from wilting and flopping (even in a sunny position).
hosta moving leafed how to, gardening, how to, perennial
This technique can be used with any size Hosta that is fully leafed out-just make sure to keep the Hosta well watered until it becomes established-which may take the rest of the season.
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Rhonda B

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Have a question about this project?

63 questions
  • Cori Sheldon
    on Jun 2, 2016

    what are you using for mulch around the hostas?

  • Roseanne Ballo Hofner
    on Jun 23, 2016

    MY HOSTA`S ARE GROWING VERY WELL BUT GETING REAL FULL HOW DUE YOU SEPPERATE THEM WITHOUT HAVING TO DIG THE WHOLE PLANT? THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME.

    • Mary Lou Morin
      on Jul 6, 2016

      I have yet to separate mine but you can do this early to mid-spring when the plants are just coming out of the ground. Simply place the point of your shovel at the point where you would like to divide them. Replant immediately and water like the article suggests. They are amazingly tough and will survive.

    • Roseann Camper
      on Jul 7, 2016

      Best done in the Spring. I use a long sharp kitchen knife, cut between the points. Then use a shovel to separate. Works better then a shovel because you can cut small portions without damaging like you do with a big shovel.

  • Aly7812999
    on Jun 25, 2016

    Snails devour my hostas. I buy snail killer and they still eat my hostas. What to do?

    • Mary Lou Morin
      on Jul 6, 2016

      You can find diatemaceous earth at a garden center. Slugs and snails hate the stuff b/c it's essentially crushed bone (from fish and other sea creatures). Place around plants you want to protect and they will not crawl to the plant.

    • Aly7812999
      on Jul 6, 2016

      Thank you

    • Karen Perras
      on Jul 7, 2016

      I put my egg shells in my blender with a bit of water and chop them till they are very small and sprinkle them under my hostas. It works the same as diatemaceous earth. It will cut the snails bodies.

    • Ron
      on Jul 8, 2016

      Small bowl of beer will kill them also

    • Ayn8383546
      on Jul 10, 2016

      Copper repels slugs and snails. I buy sections of copper tubing or any copper connectors from plumbing departments. I'll bend the tubing to partially circle the base of the plant. Sometimes I make an S and snake it between a few plants. The price of copper has increased since I first used the tubing; I now use copper tape or fasteners.

    • Rem8878921
      on Jul 30, 2016

      I also use copper tubing for slugs, etc. also, I know where my plants are in the spring because I leave the circle of tubing on the ground year round. ( l sometimes forget and see an empty space in the garden in the spring and end up planting something on top or very close to my hosta.)

    • Patricia Tripi
      on Sep 30, 2016

      I have found a flat saucer- like dish full of beer...cheaper the better, attracts and drowns the snail/ slugs.

  • Diane
    on Jul 7, 2016

    I have two identical hostas, one growing at the outer corner of my house; the other at an inner corner, where my house and front porch meet. The outer one is thriving. The inner one is puny. Both are in shade, but the inner one is a little more shaded. How can I revive my puny one? It doesn't seem to be lack of water because the few leaves it has are green.

    • Judy Burns
      on Jul 13, 2016

      Dig it up and look at the roots. If they're dry or knarled, that can tell you what might be wrong. Fill the hole in with peat. Turn it in and bring the plant out of the corner a foot when you replant. Soil in corners is not usually supplemented. It may need that peat to wake it up. Old compost would be best. Throw a shovel of soil in that is already healthy and full of worms.

  • Velma
    on Jul 9, 2016

    I have a deer problem they eat all the beautiful leaves and leave the stalks Sneakers Norwalk, CT

    • Me*8372711
      on Jul 9, 2016

      Deer repellant from the garden store.

    • Joj8436077
      on Jul 12, 2016

      Deer are awful! You can try spraying deer repelent, but it must be done regularly (like 2x month) ... but there is no guarantee. Sometimes your repelant is treated like salad dressing. The only certain remedy I have found is to fence. I finally gave in and fenced my back yard (8' at least and heavy metal) and it worked. One big buck jumped it and then jumped out but that was a few years ago. They still try to get over it.... but none have succeeded except the big guy. If you are determined to leave your hostas unfenced.....you will probably have no hostas JOJO - East Hampton, NY

    • Dmr
      on Jul 14, 2016

      I have had good luck using a deterrent that uses garlic oil. Works for both deer and rabbits. They look like a very small pen with a clip on the side so they can be clipped to a branch (like my azaleas) or to a metal stake like a plant label. They are supposed to be good for 6 months, but I could still smell the garlic after a year. You can find them online if you search for "garlic oil deer repellent". Good luck!

    • Dee
      on Jul 17, 2016

      Repels Deer Repellent on e bay works great

    • Mix up a pepper based deer repellent. Look on Pinterest.

    • Pat Lawson
      on Aug 13, 2016

      I use cayenne pepper. It works great but has to be replaced after every rain..I hate that but it is a good, safe, cheap repellent. I sprinkle it on the leaves and surrounding ground.

    • Terry
      on Oct 1, 2016

      Human hair works. I wonder if dog hair would....I have to groom my dogs and usually throw out the hair....

    • Susan Jean Feader
      on Nov 19, 2016

      This spring I tried the milk treatment and also eggs mixed with milk. I was told that deer won't eat protein, so I sprayed it on the hostas and it seemed to work. I have a terrible problem with deer, this treatment was cheap.

      , Waiting for a lunch on the hosta, ore deer
  • Joa8426473
    on Jul 11, 2016

    Deer eat my hostas as well as daisies, daffodils, and anything else they can get their teeth on, I spray them and have fences. Anything else??

    • SUP8503034
      on Jul 14, 2016

      COYOTE URINE @ SPORTING GOODS STORES

    • Joa8426473
      on Jul 15, 2016

      I don't see the answer?!!??

    • Hillela G.
      on Jul 17, 2016

      Looks like you can use the product "coyote urine" to deter animals like deer from eating your flowers. Here is an example :http://www.homedepot.com/p/Just-Scentsational-8-oz-Bottle-of-Coyote-Urine-Small-Animal-Deterrent-RS-8/204497425

    • Dee
      on Jul 17, 2016

      Try Repels Deer Repellent which I found on EBay works great

    • Joa8426473
      on Jul 17, 2016

      The lady down the street used"coyote"urin...the deer just laugh! I do use Liquid fence...they laugh at that,too. Apparently, they haven't read the manual.

    • Pat
      on Jul 28, 2016

      There is also DEER OUT another brand it has a mint smell [that deer do not like] it is also oil based [not greasy] & does not wear off in the rain. However we have mint & they eat that sometimes to. They are awful [God forgive me] We have spent a small fortune on plants the one's they are not supposed to eat they pull them out of the ground by the time you see them they are dried out & dead. I also got Lyme's disease from the deer tick. We fence in plants as muchas we can. Can not fence the whole yare it is over an acre. Good luck.

    • Penny Pirog Mercadante
      on Jul 29, 2016

      "Milorganite" is sanitized sludge from Milwaukee...sprinkle the small granules around new sprouts of day lilies, hostas, Oriental lily buds, even open chrysanthemum flowers....a 40 lb bag costs @ 15$ .....This really repels deer...doesn't wash off...reapply @4 times a year...when plants are in danger...azaleas in snow need it applied on top of snow if you can get to them....google it for suppliers....

    • Connie Carr
      on Jul 29, 2016

      Jerry Baker has a tonic we make that works great! It's the only thing we have found that works.

    • Con9416352
      on Aug 1, 2016

      My cousin swears by a product called Bobbex. She got it a Home Depot. I haven't tried it yet. Carol, 7hills, Ohio

    • Dianne Smeltz
      on Aug 4, 2016

      I have one simple product and inexpensive that repeals deer and keeps them away from my plants, trees and shrubs and that is Irish Spring Soap Bars!! I cut the bars in half and insert a piece of wire through the bar and tie it on your tree, plants or shrubs. For those plants that I can't tie a bar on I shave the bar and let it on the ground! I do this every winter to protect my shrubs and trees because the Buck (male) deer would rub his horns on the trees to establish a territory! I put the soap bars up again around October, because the females will come in the rut somewhere around that time of the year and the males get aggressive and November many of the leaves will have fallen off the trees and shrubs!

    • Florence Carnivele-Franklin
      on Sep 30, 2016

      Hair! Deer do not like the smell of human hair! Go to your local salon and ask for a bag full of hair and sprinkle it on and around your plants. No cost and yet it works like. Charm!!

    • Terry
      on Oct 1, 2016

      Yes, hair. I used it in Connecticut to keep the deer (and rabbits) from eating my tulips, daffodils and iris shoots.

    • Jody Rathke
      on Oct 7, 2016

      Deer Out works for me. I live in the middle of a woods and have a cabin in the woods. Once I spray, they don't touch them. It also last thru rain for a few weeks. I spray 2 -3 times a year.

    • Donna Cooper Liggett
      on May 7, 2017

      My dad a beautician, used hair also.
    • Gail
      on May 7, 2017

      I do not have a deer problem but, most varmints do not like Irish Spring soap. It will not kill them just run them off. It works for me and it is inexpensive.
    • The dry cleaner owner told me to put a bar of Irish Spring soap in the closet to repell moths...I can't stand mothballs.
    • Leanne Marie Cancade MacKay
      on May 17, 2017

      Euphorbia, geraniums, marigold, all herbs,
      deer hate these. Unless you put electric fence or deer fence up you'll loose all your expensive plants.
    • Jeannie Alley
      on May 20, 2017

      original scent Irish Spring. I cut it in 8 pieces and place in piece of pantyhose and hang on fence behind each rose bush. No more munching dear! Also great in the garden. It really works!
    • Jane Larson
      on May 21, 2017

      Coyote urin did not work for me.
  • Jpr9679408
    on Aug 7, 2016

    Can I transplant host as now. I live in MI?

    • Rhonda B
      on Aug 14, 2016

      Yes you can-just make sure to keep them well watered so that their roots can get established before the first frost. Good luck!

  • Nicole
    on Feb 15, 2017

    how do you remove the tape without damaging the plant? or do you leave it on until it goeas dormant in winter

    • Syl
      on Mar 4, 2017

      The tape is on sticky side out. Just cut through it to remove. No damage. :)

  • Kari Lang-Costello
    on May 18, 2017

    How do you split them? And when is a good time too?
    • Kristy Reynolds
      on May 24, 2017

      I have split over 2 dozen hostas just by lifting them then taking a sharp shovel and cutting the shovel through the middle. It has never killed either part. I drop the one half back down into the original hole and back fill the hole, sometimes needing to add extra dirt. Then dig an extra hole for the new one. I have given some of the splits to my daughter just by holding them in plastic bags. Keep them in the shade and watered. They keep for a few days.
    • Kari Lang-Costello
      on May 24, 2017

      Thank you Miss Kristy!!
    • Julie L Rossi Manning
      on May 28, 2017

      Thank you we Were just wondering this yesterday while planting our flowers.
    • Julie L Rossi Manning
      on May 28, 2017

      Thank you we Were just wondering this yesterday while planting our flowers.
  • Dorothy Blackwell
    on May 25, 2017

    When is the best time to move hosts's?
    • Kat24209075
      on May 25, 2017

      Hi Dorothy: I usually divide them at the end of the summer after they get their purple flowers that the bees love to suckle. I was able to get 50 plants to put near my stream from only 6 plants up near my house. They are very hardy plants.
    • Angel
      on May 29, 2017

      Easiest when they just begin to come up
  • Joy Wilcox Taylor
    on May 25, 2017

    Would the tape help to keep the slugs from eating the hosta?
    • Bon17203591
      on May 26, 2017

      coffee grounds
    • Char S
      on May 28, 2017

      You can also put sand around the base of a hosta to keep slugs at bay. They will not cross the sand!
    • Terese Farkas
      on May 29, 2017

      I heard leopard slugs are good for the garden. Leopard Slugs are a gardener's friend. They don't damage healthy, living plants, but they do eat other slugs, including species that can damage garden plants and vegetables. By eating dead and rotting plants, as well as fungi, Leopard Slugs recycle nutrients and fertilise the soil. https://www.opalexplorenature.org/leopardslug
    • Terese Farkas
      on May 29, 2017

      I heard leopard slugs are good for the garden. Leopard Slugs are a gardener's friend. They don't damage healthy, living plants, but they do eat other slugs, including species that can damage garden plants and vegetables. By eating dead and rotting plants, as well as fungi, Leopard Slugs recycle nutrients and fertilise the soil. https://www.opalexplorenature.org/leopardslug
    • Pam Peterson
      on May 31, 2017

      egg shells
    • Lora Taylor Hyatt
      on Jun 1, 2017

      Definitely eggs shells
  • BarbSholund
    on May 30, 2017

    I have 5 huge Bird of Paradise plants and I don't know the first thing on how to care for them? When the bloom dies do I just pull it off or cut stem clear to end? I need help with these. Thanks if you are able to respond.
  • Gwen Lantagne
    on Jun 1, 2017

    Do dianthus have a life span??
    mine are 12yrs old and are becoming very sparse???
  • Myo22516144
    on Jun 3, 2017

    I have a plant in my garden I don't know name of
    can I send a photo for you to identify?
  • Patricia Jones Gern
    on Jun 9, 2017

    My hostas always get holes on the leaves and don't look nice. How can I keep it looking nice?
    • Charles Amendola
      on Jun 9, 2017

      You've probably got slugs.. go out after dark with a flashlight to see . I use a mixture of ammonia and water in a spray bottle. Mix one part ammonia to 5 parts water. spray the little buggers. They curl up and die on the spot..and the ammonia is good for the plant. Greenhouses have a product..little blue pellets that work really well. just ask for the blue pellets. Or you could make some "poor man's" escargot!!!
  • Fmr25119956
    on Jun 12, 2017

    How do I keep voles from destroying the root system of my Hostas
    • Mike
      on Jun 15, 2017

      Put MOTH BALLS in the holes the vols have created. That should run them out for good.
    • Mike
      on Jun 15, 2017

      Putting a hose in one of the holes and turning on could do it.
    • Mike
      on Jun 15, 2017

      Put MOTH BALLS in the holes the vols have created. That should run them out for good.
    • Lynn M Roshon
      on Sep 21, 2017

      I've tried the hose and water, flooding the tunnels and it didn't work. I did try orbit spearmint, Wintergreen, bubble gum, really any kind of sugar-free gum. Chew it for a bit to get it soft, divide it in half then put some in and around all holes. It cannot be digested, I never saw deceased ones but activity ceased.
  • Gwynette Werth
    on Jun 16, 2017

    How often or how big is it time to divide my Hostas?
  • Sheila
    on Jun 17, 2017

    How and when should you divide hostas?
    • Lynne Forrestal
      on Sep 23, 2017

      Hostas can be divided most anytime , early mid or fairly late season, just keep watered well after you divide and move them. They don't NEED to be divided unless you run out of room or want more in other areas. They can live for years and years without being divided.

  • Janet Wiltgen
    on Jun 17, 2017

    How do I keep deer from devouring my hostas?
    • Pamela Hines Dona
      on Jun 17, 2017

      An older gentleman farmer told me about an eco friendly fertilizer called Milorganite. Srinkle it everywhere. It's a fertilizer, made from human fecal matter. Yes, that's right and deer hate the smell and stay away. You can purchase it at Lowe's and Home Depot.
    • Lyn Ruback
      on Jun 18, 2017

      I have grated soap on the leaves and around the base and the deers leave them alone.
    • Carey
      on Mar 19, 2018

      Or get a little dog. The deer still visit my property and I am happy about that because I love to see them and they have for 24 years kept my Norway pine beautifully trimmed. They nibble the new growth all the way around as far up as they can reach-standing on their hind legs in winter! I have never had to trim that tree and it is beautifully shaped! But because of my little dog (now Dogs), they never come into the yard where I have my hostas! I only plant things that are not deer friendly outside the yard fence. I had to wrap the trunk of my baby trees the first winter after I planted them=it was a hard winter. The trees survived and so did the deer. They have not chewed on them since and now they are adult trees so the bark isn't as tasty! : )

    • Carey
      on Mar 19, 2018

      Also, if someone is looking for a fork like you are using, they would have to ask for a "Spading fork". A Pitch fork has long thin tines for pitching hay to feed Farm animals. It would not work well for digging!

    • Miyoko Bell
      on Mar 23, 2018

      Create a hostile environment. We shoot bottle rockets at them any time we see them in the yard. If they sense it is not safe to be there they choose not to be there. Also plant plants they don’t like close to these . Highly fragrant plants such as herbs, mint, rosemary, dill they are not big fans of and they also keep bugs away... mosquitoes.

    • Miyoko Bell
      on Mar 23, 2018

      One last thing, I did finally give up fighting with the deer! I put up a mesh fence around my back yard garden. It keeps them out and my plants growing. I’m happy and they munch on the rest of my yard. I had such like lovely flowers that I could not have otherwise have had. So if you live in an area where you are about to give up gardening due to the uncontrollable critters, don’t give up, just level the playing field a wee bit! You will be so happy you did!

  • Rbm30012745
    on Sep 11, 2017

    What time of the season do you plant them?
    • Katherine Allen
      on Feb 20, 2018

      As soon as it comes up in the spring. I dig the whole ball ( root ) and cut it in as many pieces as I want. I usually get 5 to10 pieces. That will cost you about $5 a piece at the garden shop. I've never lost any bc it loves to be devided.
  • Luella brown
    on Feb 28, 2018

    How to keep cat's from or out the yard
    • Sylvia Head
      on Mar 12, 2018

      I heard that they dislike citrus so I put the peelings in the flower beds... I came up with the plastic fork's handles buried with their tongs pointing up or chopsticks for backup!!!

    • Carey
      on Mar 19, 2018

      I managed to keep the cats out of my mothers planters in her front yard by Covering them with pinecones. They don't like the stickers when they step on them and so it isn't pleasant digging. Even my own cat avoided them after that. If you don't want to have pine trees growing where you put the cones, just bake them at 200ºF for about 30 min. This will open the cones and kill the seed, although often the seeds fall out after you open them this way. I did this to create Christmas Decoration with Pine cones. It will work just as well for your garden to discourage the cats.

    • Cheryl
      on Apr 6, 2018

      I have gotten rid of them, digging in my front flower bed, by throwing my used coffee grounds in it. Haven't had one digging, in 3 years. In addition, the grounds help aerate and enrich the soil. I also put them in my compost bins.

  • Pat Savedbygrace Carter
    on Mar 27, 2018

    How do how do you keep deer from eating your hostas?

    • Chubby58
      on Apr 6, 2018

      Grate some Irish Spring soap and sprinkle around your hosta, they hate the strong smell.

    • Sharon
      on Apr 6, 2018

      there is a spray you can use but needs to be applied after rain/heavy dew. can't remember the name of it but garden centers should have it

    • Kat22094991
      on Apr 6, 2018

      It's called Deer Off. It works but it stinks. I think it's eggs and hot pepper mixture. Should use it after heavy rain. Try to clean the sprayer each time cuz it gets clogged

    • Marilyn Stein
      on Apr 6, 2018

      I use Liquid Fence, a spray recommended by a friend who's a professional gardener. Yes, it smells awful (think rotten eggs) when applied, but it dries quickly and then only the deer and rabbits can smell it. It is somewhat rain resistant, but I reapply after heavy rain. It's a little pricey in the spray bottle, but much more economical when you buy the refill. My hostas are safe from deer in our back yard, but right now I use it on heuchera, blue-eyed grass, and roses in the front. When used as directed, it really works!

  • Donna Callahan
    on Apr 6, 2018

    Hello, I love the information! I am new to the North and would like to know if anyone could suggest other plants especially that will flower or that keep their leaves most of the year. Do hostess do well in the winter?

    • Kat22094991
      on Apr 6, 2018

      Hellebore are hearty perennials. They bloom in the spring and the leaves stay green all season. And the deer don't eat them.

    • Donna Callahan
      on Apr 6, 2018

      Thank you, I live in a townhome and will work on backyard. I don’t think there are deer in our neighborhood.

  • Pat Carlino
    on Apr 6, 2018

    How, when ,and should I trim my bird of paradise plant?

  • Liz
    on Apr 6, 2018

    Very helpful info. My hostas are old and large. Will this work on these? And can I separate them so they are not so large. Currently six feet or more when leafed out. Thank you.

    • Mst31743534
      on Apr 6, 2018

      I have large plants also, In the spring just when they are coming up from the ground i just cut then in half with a shovel and plant it in a new location. I have large ones all over the yard now.

    • Susan Klinger
      on Apr 6, 2018

      My grandmother called hostas "neverdie" because you can do just about anything to them and they pop right back! I divide my big ones with a shovel, give some to friends, and replant them wherever. They are great!

    • Geri
      on Apr 6, 2018

      They're easiest to move (or divide) when they first start popping up in the spring. Even if the root system is big, the leaves won't get in your way ...

    • Danielle
      on Apr 6, 2018

      I'm with Susan's grandmother, you can abuse the heck out of a hosta and it just pops right back. Right now I have a deep shade variety in a pot under my deck because I have no place out of the sun to plant it permanently. It has been in that pot for about 11 years now, has not been fertilized - ever, and rarely gets watered, though it is in a reservoir pot. And that variety is considered one of the more delicate. HA!

  • Liz
    on Apr 6, 2018

    Very helpful info. My hostas are old and large. Will this work on these? And can I separate them so they are not so large. Currently six feet or more when leafed out. Thank you.

    • Bren
      on Apr 6, 2018

      Yes ! I have divided many host as, day lilies etc. with great results. However, I use a clean sharp knife instead of a shovel.

  • Joan
    on Apr 6, 2018

    Do you ever remove the tape? From your post it sounds like you leave it on, at least for a few weeks.

  • Laura houston
    on Apr 6, 2018

    I bought some purple iris bulbs and now they are coming up very tall but no flowers. They are in pots. We live in the desert. Any ideas with them in our soil and ground?

    • Ruth Angela Kjosa
      on Apr 6, 2018

      Iris tubers like to grow on top of the ground or no deeper than a half inch of the soil. Top of the tuber ideally should show. If you have them buried in the pots, this could be why they are not flowering. They also prefer a LOT of light. Good luck!!

  • Heavenlygal
    on Apr 6, 2018

    Great post, I have to put up a new fence this spring. Should I put my hostas

    into flower pots to save them until the fence is finished? I am not sure if they would survive the workers stepping all over the garden. Thanks

  • Bev
    on Apr 7, 2018

    Do you leave the tape on forever?

  • Larue
    on Apr 7, 2018

    What to do about mold in front yard,it’s on northern side

  • Larue
    on Apr 7, 2018

    What to do about mold in front yard,it’s on northern side

  • Larue
    on Apr 7, 2018

    Ideas for purple and white flower beds with citrus colors throne in.

  • Barbara Jo Louise
    on Apr 7, 2018

    wonderful idea! Now, How do I stop the rabbits from eating all my Hostas?

    • Becky
      on Apr 7, 2018

      Sprinkle cayenne pepper on them. It works like a charm on any of your flowers. I also spread Epsom salt on my plants to keep slugs away.

    • Barbara Jo Louise
      on Apr 7, 2018

      Thank you!!

    • Deeds
      on Apr 7, 2018

      Yes,yes,yes! I needed this advice,and I hate that I did not ever think of it! Thank you for sharing. I think I like you!

  • Lori Dumm
    on Apr 7, 2018

    Do u leave all the tape on the stems afterward ? Doesnt it hurt all the stems ? I always use mushroom soil for all around all my hostas and water them all so well its always holds up all my hostas! Makes an all pretty landscape !

    • Susan
      on Apr 7, 2018

      painters tape is gentle and easy to remove - it's made to use and remove and use again... but PLEASE!!!!!---------- READ THE POST !!!!! --

      you'll see she said:


      ""11. Keep well watered until the Hosta becomes established in it's new home. Leave the tape on for a few weeks (until it loosens)-it will help keep the Hosta leaves upright while the Hosta recovers from the move.""

    • Julie Ballentine
      on Apr 8, 2018

      I cut the legs off of old runner pantyhose and use instead of tape. Re-use, recycle

    • Lori Dumm
      on Apr 8, 2018

      Oh ill have to try all that way Thank you so much !

  • Rose Bice
    on Apr 8, 2018

    Do hastas how in South Florida

  • Rose Bice
    on Apr 8, 2018

    Do hastas how in South Florida

  • Sun3561795
    on Apr 9, 2018

    Will this work on my palm - got some frost damage and leaves dying at the top? What do you recommend I do?

  • Haw10206504
    on Apr 13, 2018

    What time of year is the best to divide hostas from the larger plant?

  • Mary Coakley
    on Apr 15, 2018

    Do Hostas.do better.in shade?

    • Audrey Quirk
      on Apr 19, 2018

      Definitely

    • Van Davidson
      on May 6, 2018

      Hosta with thicker leaves do better in the sun than the delicate thin ones. Blues (glaucus) do the best. Keep them well watered and they should do fine. Remeber though, the answers here are very generalized. If you live in Iowa, they can take less sun than if you lived in the PNW...

  • Ramona Hawkins
    on Jun 20, 2018

    I have two hosta that are extremely huge. How and when is the best time to split it in two or three?

    • Jennifer
      on Jun 25, 2018

      I move mine in late spring but you can do it during the summer as well. Just make sure you have the hole your moving it to already dug. To help with the move, I put water in the new hole and then put the hosta in.

    • G D Bruce
      on Jul 26, 2018

      It was easier for me to split and move one of my hostas right after an extended rainy spell in the spring before the leaves had fully spread. The soil was so much easier to maneuver and the leaves were pretty tightly curled so that I really didn’t have to worry as much about damaging them.

    • Karren
      on Jan 25, 2019

      sprin Time is best.

    • Karren
      on Jan 25, 2019

      When looking at your hosta you can see several areas to cut them into a single plant. What I do is dig up the whole plant and divide it depending on size into 4 and two yrs later you can do this again and spread them all over your yard. Enjoy and happy planting

    • Carol Jackson
      on Jan 27, 2019

      These are all good ideas. My 90 yr old great grandma would attack from the back - still in the ground, after a good rain -so as not to mess with front(curb appeal) They would fill in by next spring. Gardening was her "thing. "

  • Djc33256262
    on Jul 27, 2018

    For the very first time in fifteen years deer ate the leaves off all three of my hosta’s in my front garden 😢 what can I do next spring to prevent this from happening again?

    • Cinderella
      on Aug 2, 2018

      I don't have this problem bc my dogs won't let anything in my yard, but I have always heard to leave your hair clippings in a knee high panty hose and the smell of human hair will keep them away!

    • Grnandbrwn
      on Nov 11, 2018

      I don't know if I've just been lucky or this works but ... I've shaved Irish Spring Soap and put the shavings around my hostas. So far, the deer haven't touched them.

    • Luella I
      on Dec 15, 2018

      I second Irish Spring soap. I cut mine into small chunks and scatter among my hostas. This has worked the last four years.

    • Shannon
      on Jan 22, 2019

      Make Jalapeno water and spray it on and around the plants

    • Cindie
      on Jan 27, 2019

      i Have cats and that has helped me toe many years. My neighbor has no cats and the deer ate at least $200 worth.


    • Joanie
      on Jan 27, 2019

      I have tried about everything under the sun......they either get used to it or who knows, but the DEER and rabbits still show up.......they start eating as my Hosta are comin' up in the spring. I never have a Hosta in sight. Some people have a beautiful display that live in the same neighborhood. They just torment us for some reason???

    • Dan
      on Jan 27, 2019

      I have tried human hair from the barber shop and scattered it around the bed and it appeared to work last year at least.

    • RW
      on Jan 27, 2019

      I have used chili powder and hot pepper flakes with good success. Just have to reapply after the rain. Especially helps with rabbits eating my tulips.

    • Lisa Sinclair
      on Jan 27, 2019

      For Joanie, if they know you've got a little buffet for them, their gonna come back... my neighbor has the same issue, but they leave ours alone. Have you tried putting kids pinwheels ,or little flags, in your garden? I use them in the early spring, before the first leaves even appear,and "knock on wood" I haven't had a problem for years. It keeps them from nibbling down my tulips too.Good Luck!

    • Susan Harris Seeley
      on Jan 27, 2019

      Hostas are deer candy, lol. I have so many deer, hair and soap don’t work. I have an enclosed patio and I have my hostas in large pots. Some for more than 10-15 years. I separate them every few years. They winter just fine outside in pots

    • Carol Prim
      on Jan 27, 2019

      Irish spring soap shaved and sprinkled around your plants

    • P&b
      on Jan 27, 2019

      Have you tried venison?

  • Lynda
    on Sep 27, 2018

    Can this be done in late September ? We had a frost warning last week in our area, 55 minutes northwest of Montreal, Quebec.

    • Gra33487030
      on Dec 19, 2018

      I would wait until they are up next spring and growing well. It’s too late for them to recover from being moved this close to winter.

    • Diva girl
      on Jan 27, 2019

      I divide mine in the fall before the first frost. I have never had any problems.

  • Sjkfluff
    on Jan 27, 2019

    I would like to know how to kill hostas at their roots. I hate them and they do not stop growing or spreading when I think I got it all. I put an ad in paper for free hostas and come dig them out. Got a lot of diggers. But they still seem to sprout up. Any ideas to kill them without expense of new landscaping?

    • Marge
      on Jan 27, 2019

      Use weed-be-gone. Dig them up and pour the weed be gone in the hole. That should take care of your problem. You could also try vinegar . I would bring it to a boil and add a lot of salt.

    • PatDaniel
      on Jan 27, 2019

      Then never grown anything there again

    • Rosie
      on Jan 27, 2019

      Not sure PatDaniel is right but, I sure would wait 'till next year before I planted again. Mother Nature has a way to renew soil. Best, Rosie

    • Sylvie Leboeuf
      on Jan 27, 2019

      Weed-be-gone is chemical and no good for the environment. I would put a thick layer of overlapping newspapers or cardboard over that area, wet it and put some mulch on top for at least the a season (a year until the next season). The micro-organisms will start decomposing the paper/cardboard (good for the soil) then, the following season, make a hole in that paper/cardboard layer and plant what you want.

    • Jan
      on Jan 27, 2019

      I would not add salt due to the fact that salt will ruin the soil forever. Nothing would ever grow in that spot

    • SusieQue
      on Jan 27, 2019

      I want hostas around a big oak, would you send me some bare roots or plants if I send you shipping?

    • SusieQue
      on Jan 27, 2019

      One lady put Vick salve around a few plants to ward off deer....rabbits ?

  • Lynn Norman
    on Jan 27, 2019

    Are you saying you leave the tape around the Hosta after you plant it ?

  • Jay
    on Jan 27, 2019

    Got an idea of Keeping Away Rabbits?

    • Janet
      on Jan 27, 2019

      You can spray with garlic or get a rabbit deterrent product ...plenty of them on Amazon.

    • Sue
      on Jan 27, 2019

      Save hair trimmings, take a bag when you get your hair cut, or try some Fox urine from the hunting isle.

    • SusieQue
      on Jan 27, 2019

      One lady used Vick salve

  • Pat Thompson
    on Jan 27, 2019

    Do hosta like shade? Mine always seem to burn.


    • Dianab
      on Jan 28, 2019

      they are a shade plant, don't know if there are varieties that will do well in the sun

    • Gnomegirl
      on Jan 28, 2019

      Yes...hostas are shade loving. They tolerate partial sun.

  • Dee Ginegaw
    on Jan 28, 2019

    How do I split the hostas after I have dug them up?

    • Upstater
      on Jan 29, 2019

      Just split them by digging straight down through the roots with a shovel or hoe.

    • Susan
      on Jan 29, 2019

      If you divide the root system before the leaves leaf out it will be a lot easier. Just divide the clump with a sharp shooter shovel early before the leaves show. Transplant the section to new location. Very easy.

  • Mona
    on Jan 28, 2019

    Why does my blue hydrangeas bloom in mid September. They bloomed early summer for years, now only in early fall, then of course they freeze before opening to a full bloom.

    • Angi
      on Feb 3, 2019

      Mine have been acting weird the last 2 years as well. I thought I did something wrong 2 years ago when doing fall cleaning. But idk the answer, so would love to see someone else answer this.

  • Janet C. Epstein
    on Jan 28, 2019

    Great instructions Rhonda..now how can I keep the slugs from eating them up by. Mid summer?

    • Ellenlou
      on Jan 30, 2019

      I've read that you can use crushed up egg shells around the base of the plant. Supposedly slugs won't crawl over the sharp edges. I've also put out shallow pans of beer. Slugs are attracted to it and climb in and drown. I did this where I used to live because they would crawl on my concrete porch leaving their slime trails! Yuck!

    • Tawanda
      on Feb 3, 2019

      Ground eggs shells in your soil. The crushed shells cut their skin.

    • Wendy Wolter
      on Feb 3, 2019

      Beer... seriously, get lids like to peanut butter jars, fill the lids. **or if your feeling real go getter, bury the entire jar leaving the rim exposed, fill with cheap beer (of course!!) Slugs come, want to get drunk, (Lol, I'm kidding) they like the smell, whatever, fall in can't get out. I mean we're talking about slugs here, not the brightest bulb in the tanning bed! :)

    • Ruby Stewart
      on Feb 3, 2019

      Cornmeal will take care of them. I just put some in a shallow pan nearby and they vanish!

    • Sue Davis Hoard
      on Feb 3, 2019

      Or beer in a shallow pan. It will do the trick. I also take used coffee grounds and sprinkle around the soil and that will help because it makes the soil a rough terrain. The coffee grounds are also good for the soil!

    • Molly Ketner
      on Feb 3, 2019

      I use diatomaceous earth sprinkled around to plant.

    • Dorothea Morrison
      on Feb 3, 2019

      May also use sand sprinkled on top of soil, around plant

    • Dee
      on Feb 4, 2019

      Janet crush egg shells and put them around your hostas the slugs wont crawl across them or set a few small containers of beer around. The hosta area the will go to the beer you can add some salt to that end of slugs

    • Juanita
      on Feb 5, 2019

      Put eggshells around base

    • Linda
      on Feb 9, 2019

      Place beer in empty tuna can tins.

      the slugs will be attracted to the beer. Place tins close to your plants

  • Elena
    on Feb 3, 2019

    Tape. Great idea.

  • Theresa Allen McKittrick
    on Feb 4, 2019

    We just moved to a new home and don’t want to leave all of our beautiful hosta’s at the old house (we still own it)... they are in HUGE bunches... do u have a blog on separating each Hosta bunch into multiple bunches?

    Thanks!

    • Patty Miller
      on Feb 4, 2019

      I have moved a few times and taken bits of my plants without ruining the original beds. When you raise the original plant take a sharp , clean knife and cutting the roots vertically in about 2 inch sections, including 2 leaves or more. I then replace the original plant back in its hole with a little fertilizer. The new starts I wrap in newspapers, place in a bucket of plastic bag, lightly moisten. Try to plant your new plants as soon as possible. All will bounce back quickly. Easy peasy!


    • Roberta
      on Feb 10, 2019

      After you have dug them up, you should be able to carefully separate individual plants by pulling them gently apart.

    • Lori
      on Feb 15, 2019

      I talked to a gardener at Leif Erikson Park in Duluth,MN about this. She said hostas are very forgiving! You can move them at any time after the frost is gone until it freezes in the fall. You can take a shovel and cut their base and root system to divide them. As stated in the article, keep them watered until they are established. We have done this several times with success. I love the tape idea! Gonna use that this summer!

  • Lisa
    on Feb 10, 2019

    Oh wow !! I’d never thought to do this ! Mine are all SO huge !! Could you Maeve the tape around them so they stay that size ??

  • Eugenia Nikole
    on Feb 12, 2019

    are Hostas’ able to grow well in Clay dirt? As my entire yard is all clay dirt.

    • Gus
      on Feb 22, 2019

      I live in Central Virginia which is all clay soil. My hostas come up every year.

    • Wanda
      on Feb 26, 2019

      But but they don't like the sun after 12:00.


    • Alicia
      on Mar 18, 2019

      I have sun pretty much all day, and mine do well just remember to water them.

    • Janice
      on Mar 19, 2019

      Yes, however after you dug the hole you should add in potting soil and a bit of all purpose fertilizer. Pour water in the hole. After it has drained down, place the hosta in the hole. Place fresh potting soil around the plant as needed to support and make it neat. Keep it. watered.


  • DMitri
    on Mar 4, 2019

    How do I keep vermin from eating them? I use Sevens, but it doesn’t work on rabbits.

    • Terry Landstrom
      on Mar 12, 2019

      Granulated coyote urine worked for me

    • Ina L Clanton
      on Mar 21, 2019

      I crush up egg shells (I save them whenever I use eggs) Rinse off and put in a paper bag. Crush up and keep in a glass jar. Sprinkle around the base of my hostas.

  • Betty Weiss-Boesing
    on Mar 17, 2019

    Why not do this as soon as host as is only a few inches. No need for belt -tape-deep roots. Replant n water????

    • Suan allen
      on Mar 17, 2019

      That's what I thought..

    • Emilee
      on Mar 22, 2019

      This is how to relocate them once they've gotten too big. It keeps the nice round shape without tearing them apart --like I did when I thinned mine.

  • Adrienne
    on Mar 22, 2019

    Wow!! This is a great idea never knew actually how far apart to plant them. Know I have lots of space between them. So the are able to grow with the tape ?

  • CuriouserAndCuriouser
    on Mar 22, 2019

    This gives me an idea, what if you tie a piece of twine around the tape, remove the tape and allow them to grow with a string replacing the twine every so often - will this allow them to grow longer stems with the leaves falling out on top? If I were to use this method on plants with a woodier stalk - perhaps even braiding them as they grow (no need for tape or twine, and a result of a braided trunk with a lollipop top of a perfect round-topped topiary style tree of a plant with a tall, braided trunk!

  • Anita
    on Mar 23, 2019

    How to grow a vine plant for the home

  • Patricia
    on Mar 25, 2019

    When do u split them i have 135 all from 3 plants

    • Ellen
      on Apr 14, 2019

      Early spring.

    • S W
      on Apr 22, 2019

      One at a time.

    • Judi M
      on Jun 12, 2019

      Fall after plant is pretty dormant

    • Marjorie
      on Jun 23, 2019

      Early summer or fall. You don't need to separate every individual rhizome, just split your plants in half, thirds,quarters etc. These plants get huge pretty quickly. Best wishes

  • Lisa
    on May 9, 2019

    So what happened to the white stripes on the leaves....on the last photo..it looks like a different plant......🙄🤔....did something happen to the original transplant? Jus' wondering?

    Lisa@depawtureluv.com

    • Mike
      on May 9, 2019

      It was said the last picture was of a plant moved a week before

    • Sheila
      on May 13, 2019

      This is a bigger plant. She was showing that it can be done to a bigger plant like she showed in this pic.

    • Kelly
      4 days ago

      Hostas are the most hardest plant known to man besides weeds I split a bunch of hostas in the fall didn’t get them planted I set them in the ground around this circle I prepared and forgot about them when the snow came is when I remembered them and thought they were frozen out in the spring they were up and beautiful as ever they grew right down threw the ground themselves it was quite a surprise so truly they can be transplanted any time and divided anytime they are like a bad weed but beautiful in all ways

  • Fcs42702439
    on May 28, 2019

    When is the best time to divide hostas?

    • Judi M
      on Jun 12, 2019

      I do it in the fall. Has never failed me

    • Marjorie
      on Jun 23, 2019

      Fall or early summer. Keep watered well. Then mulch.

  • Lynn
    on Jul 14, 2019

    Can hostas survive in sun?

Join the conversation

3 of 143 comments
  • Judi M
    on Jun 12, 2019

    I love the belt and tape idea. I will be doing that next time

  • AnDrea L
    on Jul 31, 2019

    Not a question just a heads up. I planted mine n the next day went out n ttthey were half eaten. I later found out after rescreach that rabbits n deer love this plants. So i bought liquid fence which has kept them away. Its like candy to them. But what i found strange was they only ate the ones that are tri colored n the all green they dont seem to like.

    • Valerie
      on Sep 8, 2019

      I live in the country with lots of deer. I spray a mixture of water and dissolved Irish spring soap. A bar of soap is enough for most of the summer. Just leave it in a container with water. Smells nice too. I picked this trick up from an older neighbour of mine.

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