DIY Torched Scrap Wood Tray

8 Materials
$15
4 Hours
Easy

This small scrap wood tray works great for displaying small plants or candles. It only takes a few materials, uses an alternative way to add color to the wood, and is fun to make!

diy torched scrap wood tray

You will need some two pieces of 1 x 4" wood cut to a length of 7".

You will also need four pieces of 1 x 2" wood cut to a length of 8.5".

Set the degrees on your miter saw to 45 when you make the cuts on your 1 x 2" pieces. This will be the outer edge/frame of your tray.


Your 1 x 2 " pieces should look like the following:

diy torched scrap wood tray
diy torched scrap wood tray

Once all of your cuts are made, use a propane torch to lightly char each side of each piece of the wood until it turns black. Make sure you aren't completely lighting your wood on fire or letting it burn for too long.

diy torched scrap wood tray

Once all your pieces are torched, take your wire brush and brush off the torched black part of the wood.

diy torched scrap wood tray

You should be left with each piece looking something like this:

diy torched scrap wood tray
diy torched scrap wood tray

Next, take your favorite finish and apply it to your wood and let it dry. I am using boiled linseed oil for my project.

diy torched scrap wood tray

Once dry, align your pieces and using a nail gun to attach the pieces.

diy torched scrap wood tray


diy torched scrap wood tray

You now have a torched scrap wood tray!

diy torched scrap wood tray


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Have a question about this project?

2 questions
  • Paula
    on Feb 6, 2019

    I like the look of the burned wood. Is it absolutely necessary to scrape it?

    • Kyle
      on Feb 7, 2019

      No, but it would be very messy to touch if you don't.

  • Robyn Garner
    7 days ago

    Just curious why you didn't tell everyone the actual name of your process? It's called Shou Sugi Ban. Was developed in Japan originally on cedar wood to make it weather/waterproof. 😎

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