Carroll A
Carroll A
  • Hometalker
  • Coos Bay, OR
Asked on Jul 1, 2012

Moving a Rose Bush

Carol MaySuzette TCarroll A
+9

Answered

I need to move a rose that is in the shade. It's pretty tall but not in good shape. Should I cut it back before I move it? Does it matter what time a year I move it if it's not doing well? I think the only reason it is not doing well is it is not getting enough sun.
12 answers
  • 3po3
    on Jul 1, 2012

    So this is very broad advice, but I have had bad experiences with moving plants in the summer heat. They don't appreciate it, and often don't survive. I think you are better off in the fall or spring, but I also don't know how hot it gets in your part of Oregon. It may not be an issue (and if it's not, can I move there? It has been way too hot for too long already here this summer, and we aren't getting it as bad as the East Coast).

  • Carroll A
    on Jul 1, 2012

    LOL Come on out Steve, it has been mid 60s for the past few weeks here and yesterday it rained most of the day. Define "hot" here on the coast it's hot if it hits 70. My relatives from Colorado tend to whine about being cold here. LOL You have to love the rain to live here. So since it has not been hot and it is not going to bloom anytime soon I am thinking I should go ahead and try to move it.

  • Sherrie S
    on Jul 1, 2012

    Carroll A, if our weather was in the 60's I'd consider it fall/winter. At that time I would have no problem moving any plant especially one not doing well.

  • Carroll A
    on Jul 2, 2012

    Thanks Sherrie, That is kind of what I was thinking too. But I killed the last rose I had, so I thought I better get some advise first this time. LOL

  • Lori J
    on Jul 2, 2012

    I have broken rules and succeeded with summer transplants, but waited for a cooler snap to uproot and sometimes have sheltered in pots until a second cool snap to get things in the ground. Ideally, a cool, rainy few days and you can probably pull it off.

  • Sherrie S
    on Jul 2, 2012

    Carroll A, let me add one more thing. When you move a plant be sure to give it extra water for at least a few days. I do a lot of moving plants especially when I find they were planted in the wrong place.

  • Douglas Hunt
    on Jul 2, 2012

    I think you can successfully move your rose given your climate, Carroll. It should quickly thank you for the additional sun. Sherrie's right: regular water is crucial for a successful transplant. And get as much of the rootball as you can.

  • Lori J
    on Jul 2, 2012

    My dad broke every garden rule very successfully. Sometimes I think he saw landscaping like rearranging furniture. ;-) His secret--Miracle Grow's Quick Start. I have taken his advice, but not so much his habits.

  • Carroll A
    on Jul 2, 2012

    Thanks everyone! If it stays cool I will be moving it on Wednesday I think.

  • Carroll A
    on Apr 29, 2013

    Well I did not get it moved last July... LOL I finally got it moved this week. Its been in it new home all of 72 hours and the deer found it and ate EVERY leaf off it this morning. They never touched it in the old spot.....

  • Suzette T
    on Mar 7, 2015

    Carroll, I can so relate to your transplant story, sadly to say. I have alway used what Lori's dad used and swear by that one solution TRANSPLANT solution has never once failed me. I also in same breath swear by root hormone as well. But then those darn deer. After laboring to prep the rose to dig up and then properly prepare new spot and dig up haul over dig it in and set, right, just like you. Only to return and see it chewed to near death. To save my own sanity found terrific easy way to stop deer dead in tracks. You'll laugh for not thinking of this yourself it's that simple. I string the rose bush up with nothing more than kite string or any fiber cotton hemp just not fishing wire or twine. And on the string around newly transplant goes bells I just string using simple dollar store bells. It works every time. I have found from experience only that how long you need to keep string bells on depends on the stubbornness of the deer. Oh and lucky you for when I am not worrying about the deer I look over my shoulder and then there a horse going after another plant scrub or bush.

  • Carol May
    on Mar 9, 2015

    I believe it is best to prune any plant or tree (that I can think of) before transplanting. It gives a better chance of getting re-established without having to support extra growth. I also prune excess overgrowth before winter, but fairly drastically around Valentine's day, just before feeding them again. Its better to transplant in cooler weather and plant in composted soil. Compost or dried manure is good to help control weeds and moisture. Most roses like a well-drained acid soil, a lot of sun and quite a bit of water, when weather is hot. They don't like their leaves to stay wet in the evening, it causes black spot so, I use soaker hoses (never at night). Bayer Rose Food AFTER pruning and Disease Control are both good products. I think the deer just happened by and found the rose.

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