Does anybody know what this is?

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Sorry if this is a duplicate. Does anybody know what this is? If it is decorative I may keep it. If not, I will pull it up. Thanks

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  5 answers
  • John walls John walls on May 03, 2019

    Weed Definitely a weed

  • Bijous Bijous on May 03, 2019

    A weed is only a plant for which we haven't found a purpose. Take a stem of leaves to a local nursery, not a box store, and see if they can identify it. When in doubt, dig it up and put it in a pot. From there see what happens. Happy Gardening!

    • Lynn Sorrell Lynn Sorrell on May 03, 2019

      What we consider weeds are the natural plants,herbs ,flowers that have been displaced by ornamental plants & flowers that are prettier to most gardeners. All of them have significant importance purpose in the world producing needed habitat, food and homes for bugs, insects and animals along with medicinal and food purpose for humans.

  • Jewellmartin Jewellmartin on May 03, 2019

    It looks so familiar, but I can name it. I might put it in a hanging basket and keep photos of it for a few weeks. I bet it has white flowers. 🌺 🌸

  • Lynn Sorrell Lynn Sorrell on May 03, 2019

    common name Pigweed;Pigweed may be aggressively pulled from gardens and tree beds in the United States, but it's lovingly cultivated in other parts of the world. Amaranthus retroflexus is known by many other names besides pigweed, including green amaranth, redroot amaranth, careless weed, tumbleweed, and callaloo. Like other members of the amaranth family, it has a storied history and an important role as a food staple in many cultures. Its designation as a weed lies in the fact that each plant can produce inconspicuous green flower clusters that produce upwards of 100,000 seeds, ensuring many generations per season.The seeds themselves are rich in protein and have a higher protein content than rice, sorghum, or rye. They can be easier to digest than soy, wheat, or dairy and can be ground into a meal or popped like corn!The leaves of pigweed are also incredibly nutritious. They're high in vitamins A and C and folate, as well as calcium. In Jamaica, pigweed is known as callaloo and is a culinary staple. You can find it for sale in West Indian markets. In can be stewed, sautéed, tossed into a stir-fry, added to an omelet—there is no wrong way to cook pigweed! Recipe references can be traced to India, Nepal, Indonesia, Guatemala, the Philippines, China, Nigeria, Uganda, Kenya, Greece, Lebanon, and Brazil. Pigweed has been flourishing and feeding humans internationally for centuries.Finally, while various amaranth species are often considered among the “ancient grains” that are making a comeback, Amaranthus retroflexus also has real potential as a food crop of the future. First, it has developed a resistance to the common weed-killing pesticide glyphosate (Roundup), which means that it can compete and thrive in our increasingly toxic agricultural fields. Second, pigweed performs a particular type of photosynthesis called C4 carbon fixation. C4 plants are able to more efficiently absorb atmospheric carbon dioxide than C3 plants and are adapted to higher temperatures and drier conditions. May we all be as prepared to handle climate change as pigweed!It's blooming. If you do not want it in your garden remove flowers(they are green tops) or pull the plant out before they spread.

  • Jewellmartin Jewellmartin on May 03, 2019

    Thanks, Lynn, for all this great information!