How to Age Thrift Store Frames With Antiquing Dust

6 Materials
$20
1 Day
Medium

My daughter found these thrift store frames about five years ago. They were a couple of dollars each when she bought them. She's been using them in her room as bulletin boards. But when she went to collage she left them behind. So I took over and updated them. These oval frames had been beautiful with a lot of detail but they'd been dropped so much over the years that they where getting pretty beat up.

how to age thrift store frames with antiquing dust

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BTW,  Country Chic has provided a coupon code for my readers. Use DUCTTAPEDENIM10 to get 10% off your order.

Supplies for this project:


  • antique frames with lots of detail
  • Country Chic All-in-One Decor Paint, in Vanilla Frosting
  • Country Chic Antiquing Dust, in Willow
  • paint brushes
  • Country Chic Natural Wax
  • Wax Brush
  • rags


First, I gave them a couple of coats of vanilla frosting.

how to age thrift store frames with antiquing dust

HELPFUL HINT: If you need to step away before you’re finished painting, put your paintbrush in a plastic baggie. You can even leave it overnight if you stick it in the freezer!

After the two coats of paint dried, I waxed the frames with Country Chic Natural Wax. Now y’all know that I don’t like waxing, but this finish is worth it! Plus, it’s just so much fun to throw the dust around! Then I pounced on the Country Chic Antiquing Dust. 

You can see a video of this technique on my website.

how to age thrift store frames with antiquing dust

I let it sit for 30 minutes, then I wiped off the extra dust and buffed. The antiquing dust really made the details POP!

how to age thrift store frames with antiquing dust

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Ann @ Duct Tape and Denim

Want more details about this and other DIY projects? Check out my blog post!

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Have a question about this project?

3 of 5 questions
  • Cheri Tanner
    on May 28, 2019

    So.......what did you use them for????? Did you put pictures in them or use them for something else?

    • Ann @ Duct Tape and Denim
      on Jun 5, 2019

      I actually sold the ones in this project. But I've done others with this technique and either hung them without anything behind them or put wedding pictures in them.

  • Darlene Houdashelt
    on May 28, 2019

    Do you have any tips for repairing the older frames?

    • Ann @ Duct Tape and Denim
      on Jun 5, 2019

      No, I don't usually repair the frames. Unless they're falling apart and we tack them back together. But I, and my customers, like a shabby chic/rustic look and usually don't mind a few missing pieces.

  • Erika
    on Jun 4, 2019

    I have several antique frames with the decorations slowly (or quickly) deteriorating. I like your note that the dust made the details pop. I have some frames that are all wood, that will help. But others are more of a clay substance, at least the details, which I'm sure you know crumble. Does this technique also help preserve what's left of the details? Does it stop more from crumbling away? Thanks!

    • Ann @ Duct Tape and Denim
      on Jun 5, 2019

      I don't usually repair my frames. I (and my customers) like a shabby chic/rustic look and don't mind small pieces missing. But the paint and wax do seem to hold what's there together better.

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