How can you be sure there's argon gas in your triple pane windows?

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I've always been my opinion that you can see a ripple in the seal on triple windows where the needle to install the argon gas. Does it mean the glass company ripped me off when there isn't any place you can see the insertion point?

  5 answers
  • William William on May 25, 2019

    If the windows are clear and no fogging or moisture between the glass panes then they are fine. If there was a noticeable insertion point it would be the first to fail. Since the seal is a special rubberized material the insertion point collapses on itself after the argon is introduced and sealed. Failure of the seal occurs when the vulcanized seal separates from the glass panes causing the argon to leak out and air is sucked in. Since there is moisture in air the windows will fog.

    • See 1 previous
    • Tedward Tedward on Jun 21, 2019

      When windows were made 50 years ago, argon gas was not used. As long as moisture can't penetrate the seal, they will not fog up. The argon gas is an added feature which lessens the transfer of heat .

  • Lifestyles Homes Lifestyles Homes on May 25, 2019

    If they’re made by a large recognized window manufacturer, there should be no worries. They should also come with a warranty, then.


    If you’ve condensation inside the windows, the seal has failed.


    • See 1 previous
    • Tedward Tedward on Jun 21, 2019

      Condensation is not between the panes of glass, it's on the inside pane of glass inside the house.

  • William William on May 25, 2019

    Argon or other inert gas was always used in double pane windows. That was what prevented the transfer of heat and cold. Without the inert gas the windows would fog up from condensation. Some manufacturers use a desiccant either incorporated in the seal or separate. If you are concerned call the manufacturer of the windows.

    • Tedward Tedward on Jun 21, 2019

      My problem is I believe the manufacturer ripped me off to save money and didn't make them the Low E which I paid for. They aren't about to admit I was short changed.

      Tedward

  • William William on Jun 21, 2019

    If your windows do not fog up they do have Argon gas in them. Air has moisture in it and condensation will form. If the seal breaks the Argon leaks out and air gets sucked in. The low E is a coating on the inside surface of the glass applied at the factory. It gives the glass either a slight smokey tinge or a bluish rainbow cast depending how light hits it. Some low E windows have a plastic film in between the glass panels that reflects outside UV light. Triiple pane glass panels have clear glass inside and outside with a UV coated glass panel in between the two.

  • William William on Jun 21, 2019

    If you have condensation on the inside pane of glass inside the home your humidity level is too high in the house. The windows are made to prevent heat and cold transfer between outside and inside. The low E coating or film reflects UV rays from sunlight. They do not prevent condensation on the inside glass when humidity levels are high in the home.