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  • Hometalk Helper
  • Vineland, NJ

Drying Herbs


I think I may have been a little overly ambitious when I planned out my first herb garden this season. I'm not even cooking that much anymore, so I'm not really sure what possessed me to plant so much! That said, I am in love with the whole look of the vertical garden, not to mention the wonderful scents that greet me everytime I get near it.

In order to keep the plants healthy, it is necessary to cut them back when the get too full, or in the case of basil, before it goes to flower.

I want to stress, I am a novice. I have done a lot of reading and searching online for ways to dry herbs, and the following tutorial is the way I have chosen to preserve my first harvest.

drying herbs

Here's my vertical garden before the harvest. Pretty as it is, it was getting too full. I had already cut back the basil last week, but everything else was overdue.

drying herbs

Freshly cut thyme, sage, mint, oregano, rosemary, lemon balm, and parsley.

drying herbs

I prepared twist ties by forming a small loop in the center.

drying herbs

I gathered up small bunches of like herbs and used the twist ties to bundle them up.

drying herbs

For the next steps, I gathered up paper bags, twine, scissors, hole punch, and a marker.

drying herbs

I labeled the bags with the name of each herb and then, while still flat, punched holes all the way around.

drying herbs

Cut lengths of twine about 18" long. They were then threaded through the loops in the twist ties. I had large paper bags so I had decided to place several bundles in each bag. Once in place, I stapled shut, encasing the twine in the center staple.

drying herbs

Believe it or not, this is the garden after the harvest. The bags are all hanging in my basement where there is a dehumidifier running. The bags will catch any leaves that fall while drying. The herbs should be dry within the next two weeks. Once dried, I'll be storing them in airtight jars.

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    Have a question about this project?

    3 questions
    • Wyldecent
      on Jun 22, 2019

      Love your herb garden. Did you build it? Can you tell me how? Thanks!

    • Dahliaqueen
      on Jun 22, 2019

      Don’ t have basement or dehumidifier. Any suggestions where l might hang my herbs? I have an unheard enclosed back porch, but if it gets rainy might get damp?? Thanks great instructions!

      • Becky E.
        on Jun 30, 2019

        you could hang them in your garage. If you don't have a garage, hang them in a spare bedroom.

    • Becky E.
      on Jun 30, 2019

      Does the wooden structure that you planted the herbs in have drainage holes in the bottom? If so how large?

    Join the conversation

    2 of 5 comments
    • Joanie
      on Jun 23, 2019

      This is a super, fun growing, beautiful plants, plus money saving project. 5 stars and great job!!  I bet you enjoy the many scents.

    • Donna
      on Jul 2, 2019

      I grow herbs every summer in pots on my backyard patio. Living by the gulf coast some years they survive the winter. I lay out my herbs in a cardboard box on top of my frig when they need harvesting. When they are dry I put them in leftover jars from store bought herbs. I give excess to friends and family.

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