Emily
Emily
  • Hometalk Helper
  • Cape Elizabeth, ME
Asked on Aug 18, 2019

Can you help identify this large hand-knit tablecloth/bed cover?

EmilyLinnieFlipturn
+6

Answered

I found this cloth, believe it is a bed cover as it has no edging on one side. It is badly damaged but appears to be all hand work. Is anyone on here an expert on needlework? I dealt in linens at one time but don't recall seeing a piece like this.

q identifying a large tablecloth bed cover
q identifying a large tablecloth bed cover
q identifying a large tablecloth bed cover
q identifying a large tablecloth bed cover
q identifying a large tablecloth bed cover
6 answers
  • Gk
    on Aug 19, 2019

    It does look like a decorative bed cover! It looks very fragile. I have a tablecloth that is very similar that I know is at least 75 years old. Sorry that I can't help you any further than that!

  • Tootsiemacoco
    on Aug 19, 2019

    piano dust cover?

  • Flipturn
    on Aug 19, 2019

    The type of needlework that characterizes this bed cover is called Tatting.

    It is worked with either a needle or a shuttle.


    https://simplycollectiblecrochet.com/2014/05/difference-between-shuttle-tatting-needle-tatting-and-cro-tatting/


    https://lynscraftsyarns.com/what-is-tatting/

  • Flipturn
    on Aug 19, 2019

    As far as determining to what extent the piece has been worked by hand, and if it may have any archival value, I would suggest that you contact either a curator at an accredited museum, or Threads Magazine. On the back cover of every Threads issue, a vintage hand sewn garment is always featured. As it is a reputable source of information, they should be able to refer you on to someone who can help you more.

  • Linnie
    on Aug 19, 2019

    It could be hardanger or white work embroider. My grandmother used to do this.

    • Flipturn
      on Aug 19, 2019

      Hi Linnie,

      Yes, you are right, that portions of this piece could be described as being hardanger, also called whitework. This style of embroidery, is worked on even-weave linen, using counted and drawn thread techniques. The photo below shows an example of hardanger.

  • Emily
    on Aug 19, 2019

    After posting this I did more research and found samples on Pinterest. The names are seem to be from an area of the world I can't pin point. Thank you all for your replies, I really appreciate it. I had not heard of "threads" and so will check that out. I have a real reverence for old things and hate to discard them when I know they are hand made.

    • Emily
      on Aug 19, 2019

      Kathleen I have piece of lace I will photograph and post. I think it is hand done but since I don't do any hand needlework, I am hard pressed to identify things. It is possible the one edging was removed. Do you do pillow lace or the other kind (can't remember what it is called) I have always been an antiquarian; since the age of about 7 or 8! We have a house filled with old things (now including us!) but I love textiles.

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