Budget-Friendly Statement Ceiling

13 Materials
$80
5 Hours
Medium

When you want to create a home office that wows, a great addition is a statement ceiling. However, even though your imagination can come up with great ideas, they are not always cost-effective. Enter in the budget-friendly statement ceiling. This simple, yet jaw-dropping accent will make any room in your home feel like it's worth a fortune, but you'll know it only cost you under $80.

With my DIY sidekick (a.k.a. my dad) , we took this home office from done to dreamy. Let's walk through the steps we took to make this simple wow statement.


Step 1: Remove Pre-exisiting Light Fixture


Step 2: Mark Studs on Ceiling


Before we even did anything with the piece of wood, we mapped out how the wood was going to be attached on the ceiling. First thing was to use our stud finder to mark the studs. We started finding the studs closest to the light box. We marked them with a pencil on the ceiling and then verified the distance between each... 16" apart. We then took the measurements from the wall to the stud to get a better idea of how many studs our 4' x 4' piece would cover in its diagonal form. We wrote these measurements down so we could mark them again when we put the piece of wood in place on the ceiling.


Step 3: Measure the Light Fixture


For my light fixture, I had a 5.5" square cover and a wire box that had a 4" radius. In order to keep the wood piece within the square cover, but still allow the wire box to be accessible, I made the cut on the wood a 4.5" square. Be sure to measure and measure again before cutting. The goal is to get the light fixture cover to hide the entire opening in the wood once installed.

Step 4: Cut Hole in the Wood Piece


Before cutting the piece out of the middle, we marked the center of the 4' x 4' piece of wood. Since our square cut out needed to be 4.5", we lined up our flat ruler with the 2.25" mark in the center and drew a mark on either side.


After repeating for all sides, we outlined the square in full that needed to be cut out. I'm sure there are better tools to actually cut the hole in the wood, but all we had on hand was a circular saw. With the wood piece propped up on two sawhorses, we very carefully used the circular saw above the top of the wood and cut on the lines we had drawn.


Step 5: Stain the Piece of Wood

Step 6: Paint Rosettes & Moulding with Your Ceiling Paint


Step 7: Measure Again


To avoid any misalignment with the install, we marked the ceiling with an X for each corner the wood piece would line up with, so we could see if we were holding the piece straight before nailing it. We also extended the measurements of the studs we originally marked on the ceiling to a spot outside of where the 4' x 4' piece would go, so we could see it when we held up the wood piece to install it.

Step 8: Nail Wood to Ceiling


This part is definitely a two person job. We used 10 dark brown nails, two on each side in line with the studs and two in the area aligned with the studs.

Step 9: Nail Chair Rail Moulding


Once your main wood piece is up, you can trim out the edges using the chair rail moulding. This is where a nail gun would be helpful.


Step 10: Hide Nails Using Wood Putty


Step 11: Touch Up the Paint, if necessary

Step 12: Glue Rosettes to Each Corner

We used a swirl of glue on the back of the rosettes and the sides to adhere them to the moulding as well. We had a wet rag handy, too, to wipe off any excess glue. In order to make sure they stayed put, we used two strips of painter's tape to hold the rosettes in place while the glue dried.


Step 13: Caulk Edges (optional)


Step 14: Re-Hang your Ceiling Light Fixture

For the full tutorial and all my tips, check out the original post https://www.myhomierhome.com/wood-statement-ceiling/. What do you think of the finished product?

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Christin | My Homier Home

Want more details about this and other DIY projects? Check out my blog post!

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Have a question about this project?

2 questions
  • Heje
    on Oct 30, 2019

    Would it have worked out just as nice with the middle being painted and the edges being the molding?

    • Margie Hood
      on Nov 8, 2019

      Wow simple yet very elegant and pleasing!! I love love love it!!! I bet you have started alot of convos with that piece haven't you... well I do love it and for one am going to try it off my kitchen where in near future I want to put a nice pendant light and with my budget you totally hooked me up with some awesomeness!!!Thank you so much for sharing your Talent!

  • Betty Sutton Smith
    on Nov 7, 2019

    OK, let me know,but... hope it doesn't sound sill Can i put a cabinet over my cooktop using this idea for a microwave/ fan???? We didn't add one when my house was built . Isee the need for one badly. We were trying to save mony in each area!!! My first home. My ceilings are low enough I think it might work ! What do you think?? I do know it would have to be afixed extra sturdy to hold acabinet and microwave!!! My son is very good at things like this . One reason i want this , is my ceiling.is is turning dingy from all the cooking !! Plz let me know what you think!!! Oh and yes there is an exhaust pipe leading directly across this place in the ceiling . The cooktop is gas. So when the power is out i still have a way to cook dang it lol. Thanks and sorry it sooo long

    • Christin | My Homier Home
      on Nov 8, 2019

      Thanks! I am no expert in this space, so I would definitely consult a contractor, but it sounds like it could possibly work! I’m curious to know what you find out and see the results! I’m sorry I wasn’t more helpful, but I like your idea!

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