Asked on Jan 4, 2020

How do I repair a large hole in the ceiling?

Lifestyles HomesKmdreamerMogie
+5

Answered

I want to remove my old swamp cooler vent and repair the hole so it looks like the rest of the ceiling. My ceiling is textured (not popcorn) like plastering.


8 answers
  • Tinyshoes
    Tinyshoes
    on Jan 4, 2020

    Neelie....You can usually pick up a repair kit at most hardware stores. Good look

  • Deb K
    Deb K
    on Jan 5, 2020

    Hello Neelie, You want to start by repairing the hole with some wood and /or drywall, you can buy the texture at your local home improvement store, in a pinch, you could use dry wall compound to make a texture to match what you have. I have attached a video to assist you, hope it helps

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PpBKtCpDvK0

  • Dee
    Dee
    on Jan 5, 2020

    ou will need to dry wall the ceiling and then texture. Home Depot and lowes sells texture in a can for ceilings and walls. I used the wall kind when repairing and it worked really well, so I expect the ceiling texture should work just as well. It is only $11 a can.

  • Johnavallance82
    Johnavallance82
    on Jan 5, 2020

    Hi Dee,

    You would need to stick some wooden slates to the other side of the hole onto which you can fix a circle of plasterboard to replace the vent. Then use "Artex" from decorating store and pattern making implement to reproduce your ceiling pattern. Take a picture of the pattern with you a aid choice. Otherwise call a Plasterer who is able to fix the hole and complete the repair for you.

  • Betsy
    Betsy
    on Jan 5, 2020

    Hi Neelie: Most times you can get scrap pieces of dry wall at your home improvement store free. Just ask if they have any. A no is better than a missed yes:) It's not as hard to do as it seems, even though this looks long, and you can do this for any type of hole in wallboard, on the wall or ceiling.


    Here's what you need.


    A piece of wallboard that is about 3" bigger than your hole;


    a pencil;


    A pieces of string about 3 feet long with a knot at one end;


    2 pieces of wood, like paint stirring sticks, 4" longer than the hole;


    glue;


    something to make 2 small holes in the new wall board and sticks;


    spackle;


    A can of fruit, soup, beans or something, doesn't matter.


    Now, the destructions:)


    Cut the drywall so that it will cover your hole with a couple of inches all around. Now, draw around this piece of drywall, onto your wall. Remove it carefully, straight down, and don't turn it around at all. With the pencil, make a mark on the back of the drywall to show which side is up and faces which way. Make a mark on the wall or ceiling, too, so you can match the marks. You're going to paint the area anyway, so the mark won't show. This way, you will have a perfect fit. Now, cut the old drywall out along the pencil line, and if you're lucky, you will have the size of the old opening left in it, or at least close. Get the sticks and poke a hole in each one, in the middle and centre. Run the string through each of the paint sticks with the knot coming out of the back, facing the inside of the hole, and the string hanging on the outside of the wall. Make a hole in the middle centre of your new wall board, opposite the holes in the sticks. Glue the sticks firmly, to the inside of the wall, gluing at the top and bottom of the sticks. When they are fairly well set, put some spackle on the rough edges of your patch, the sticks and the hole in the wall/ceiling. While that is drying a bit, pull the string through the back of the patch where you made the hole. Pull it all the way through, noting (ta da!) the position of the arrow! :), and push the patch into the hole. It should fit perfectly! Now, get your cans of fruit, beans, whatever and tie the string around the can. Let the can dangle, it will pull the paint sticks to the wall and secure the patch to the wall and sticks. This way, your patch won't push back inside if you push on it. Let this sit over night. When it seems secure and dry, (push it a bit) then you can cut the string close to the patch and maybe sand the end off if it is sticking out. Put the can back where it came from. Spackle the edges of your patched area, feathering the spackle out and let it dry. Wipe with a damp cloth, or sand, your choice, and put another thin coat of spackle all over the patch and edges, feathering the edges, and let dry then sand or wipe. Paint to match and there, you're all done! :) I t's not as daunting as it seems. You can do this, I have faith in you. Heck, if I can do it, anyone can!:)


    Good luck

  • Kmdreamer
    Kmdreamer
    on Jan 8, 2020

    If the whole is very big you need to put a piece of Sheetrock in the whole then compound over the whole thing as flat as you could wait for it to dry when you don’t see a dark shadow it’s dry then give another coat of compound when covered good and flat lightly sand to soft touch with your hand then paint

  • Lifestyles Homes
    Lifestyles Homes
    on Jan 8, 2020

    A span of 2’ on a piece of drywall will bow, over time. Add another “rib” or ceiling joist.

    Mimicking the existing ceiling texture will have to be done with old fashioned craftsmanship, without any pictures for us to look at. It can always be sanded down and the-worked.

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