Asked on Jan 14, 2020

How can we redesign our staircase?

FlipturnDLinda
+21

Answered

Hi Hometalk Peoples. I think our house just gets bigger and bigger and the projects just keep growing. Bet some of you can relate. We have removed all the carpeting from this house, including the stairs. Once the living room is done, the staircase is next. It has a landing we want to remove and just make it flow straight. The landing forces the stairs to open partially into a wall. Also the bottom 2 steps are off kilter and it messes up the lines on the side wall under the rail, making it impossible to trim out nicely. Has anyone ever changed their staircase by removing the landing altogether? Also, best retreading, new treads suggestions? And yes, there's more than enough room in entry to accommodate the change. Thank you in advance!D. The Reluctant Renovator 😏

We want this stair wall to be a clean line - no turn. Then we can dress it up like our island. You can see that the stairs turn into a wall somewhat... don't like.

Our island project. This is the wall treatment we want to mirror on the stair wall when we get ut straight...

18 answers
  • Flipturn
    on Jan 14, 2020

    I agree that this turn is very awkward and cumbersome looking as it juts out into the foyer walking space.


    Yes, landings such as this one can be removed to reduce the overall footprint of the stairwell. It will be important to build that last step the correct height and pitch so that it does not result in a tripping hazard. Also, you will need to decide whether or not to keep a newel post in the plans.


    Do you know what is underneath the landing? Is it the same subfloor and flooring as the rest of the foyer, or is it hollow from the underside?

    • D
      on Jan 14, 2020

      Yes yes. Hi hi. Extended family here has not agreed with my assessment that the turn is awkward - needs to go. So glad you agree. Ok your questions- underneath the landing is the basement stairwell. And a light fixture. There is plenty of headroom in basement stairwell without landing and hubby can move the light, no problem. The mahogany flooring does go under the bottom 2 steps fortunately. We are planning to sand down, refinish the flooring. (I'm hoping to get it quite light and less red in wood tones.) The steps and the landing are currently just primed subfloors...like most of the house at this point. Ha. Better than old carpet though while we renovate. As far as a newel post - not reusing what's there. I would really like the bottom step to be rounded but don't want it to stick out oddly just the same. A curved post on the bottom step, wood banister, with metal balusters is what I'm thinking. I have a lot of wood colors to factor in: nice maple cabinets nearby- (not yellowy maple, more like a bamboo color), and multi-toned mahogany flooring. The woodwork used to be honest to goodness orange stained pine. You can see in pictures that I had to deal with that! Ha! But still concerned about wood tones for treads and banister. Am thinking we need to refinish the floor after we straighten the staircase, to know what tones to aim for. I hope i answered your questions.

      Ty Flipturn!

      D

  • Unique Creations By Anita
    on Jan 14, 2020

    If you are not 100% confident about how to do this I would not recommend doing it yourself. Maybe get a contractor in, this could snowball into a massive job. Just my opinion.

    • D
      on Jan 14, 2020

      Oh goodness gracious... hubby was 200% sure he "could do it all" 13 months ago... i tried till blue in the face to get him to not buy this house. Didn't work. Looking at another year easily. So....any support I can find here is a genuine blessing to me. 👍😉

  • Scarlet Paolicchi
    on Jan 14, 2020

    My stairs get a lot of scuff marks so on the vertical white part so I suggest runner carpet or stencil work https://www.hometalk.com/19781941/stenciled-stairs-worth-staring-at-

  • Judy in Canton.
    on Jan 14, 2020

    It looks like if you eliminate the turn the stairs will go straight to the closet door. Looking at the direction your main door opens and closet door open it leaves a small "turn around" space. Also per building codes steps have to be a certain height. I would work with the turn.

  • William
    on Jan 14, 2020

    That is easy. You can remove the landing and two steps with no problem. All you would need to do is to replicate the height of the landing and two steps in a straight run to the existing stairs. You would also gain more space with the landing gone. The stairs are such good shape. Just use some molding to cover the gaps on the ends and paint them. Or use gel stain on the steps and paint the risers.

    • D
      on Jan 14, 2020

      Ty William. I agree. Although th ed steps are currently primed subfloor. Definitely need to resurface.

  • William
    on Jan 14, 2020

    It's true. Builders use construction grade material for stairs that will be covered with carpeting. But they can easily be resurfaced without having to replace. If you choose to replace just replace only the stairs with prefab steps from the homecenter. What I did with my basement stairs that were covered with glued on linoleum with a metal bullnose was remove the bullnose glue down laminate flooring, add a 1X2 for the bullnose. Here are some ideas other Hometalkers did.


    https://www.hometalk.com/search/posts?filter=carpet%20stairs


  • Sharon
    on Jan 15, 2020

    Doesn't look like you have enough room to have the stairs come straight down.... its gonna hit the front door and block the closet (?)


    You could look at replacing the staircase with a spiral staircase which would really open it up.

  • Flipturn
    on Jan 15, 2020

    Although unique looking, spiral staircases are generally less safe compared with straight. They are a nightmare to cut and fit and coverings to, difficult to vacuum, and require custom bannisters.

    • D
      on Jan 15, 2020

      Agreed. However considering installing an inexpensive one on 2nd floor instead of pull down access ladder for the attic. The attic is huge, insulated, subfloored, with ceiling, and lights. Next owner might wish to convert this into usable living space if access were more standard. Thoughts? Would giving up a very small bedroom to install spiral be a fair tradeoff with resale value in mind? And due to roof pitch a standard staircase won't work in limited 2nd floor spatial options. Would value input here, greatly.

      Ty!!

  • Flipturn
    on Jan 16, 2020

    IMO spending money installing a spiral staircase to the attic just to try to raise the potential resale value of the home would not the wisest use of funds.


    At best, you can hope to see only a % cash return at point of sale on upgrades considered valuable, predominately kitchens and bathrooms. It is impossible to second guess what potential new owners of the the home will like or not like about it. Neither is it possible to second guess what any new owner will begin changing about the home when they move in.


    In my experience however, a spiral staircases would not only not add $ value, it may even be seen as a liability, due to the safety factor.


    Even the the space in the bedroom may be 'very small' as you say, use it however it best meets your needs living in the house at the present time.

  • Flipturn
    on Jan 16, 2020

    If you wanted to make more regular use of the attic and wanted a safer, more enclosed stairwell (compared with the pull down ladder), I am wondering if there is room to build a space-saving staircase to the attic that creates storage?


    Some examples inspired by the Japanese tansu are below.

  • D
    on Jan 16, 2020

    Oh those are really impressive! Might really fit as well without sacrificing the bedroom. I do feel that having easier access would provide buyers the option of creating usable living and or storage space in the oversized attic. Which in my opinion would be a plus when it comes time to sell. It might make the house more desirable- perhaps sell faster, even if it didn't increase $ value. And I know we'd make better use of the attic for storage with one of those. What about codes? Would they pass? Thot: instead of storage under them, any designs allow for a twin bed?

  • Flipturn
    on Jan 17, 2020

    Regulations regarding building codes can vary considerably according to where you live. Often inspections and enforcements of the codes apply to new construction only.


    As you are the homeowner, and are doing the renovation work yourself, permits and inspections are not entirely necessary. The issue whether or not modifications comply with what is deemed to be safe though may arise when a potential home purchaser hires a home inspector and the house 'passing' is a condition of the sale.


    However, depending on when your house was originally built, some portions may qualify for 'grandfathering' . Here is one link to a short article explaining what this term means: https://buildingpro.ca/kelowna_home_inspections/meaning-consequences-term-grandfathered-home-inspection/

    • D
      on Jan 17, 2020

      So helpful. So very appreciated! My husband is now considering if we hv space for tansu steps to attic. House is 14 yrs old.

  • Flipturn
    on Jan 17, 2020

    As far as floor-space-saving beds, yes, building in one under a stairwell can be an option. If the bed is not going to be used on a regular basis though, you may want to consider a trundle style- either built in, or as a function of a piece of furniture, such as the sofa below.


    http://www.home-designing.com/2014/04/space-saving-beds-bedrooms

  • Josie
    on Jan 17, 2020

    I would also agree with someone above - if you are not sure how to do it better employ someone to do it. There are many inspirations in the Internet that you can use to make your stairs. I really like the idea with some pattern on it.

  • D
    on Jan 18, 2020

    Super helpful Linda! Thank you! A picture is worth a thousand words, so they say. Tis true. Really helps as we are working to have a clear picture of (hopeful) end result. The key is to choose a design that fits with our situation, skill levels (or willingness to experience a new learning curve), as well as time available for the task. One needs to choose what appeals to them aesthetically of course, but I feel it's best to remember down the road it may need to also appeal to a buyer. So aiming in the middle somewhere is best, unless you intend to stay in the house indefinitely- then anything goes!😉 Thanks again! Great link!👏

  • Flipturn
    on Jan 19, 2020

    Wow! That link has every stairway variation other than an Escher drawing!


    https://www.pinterest.com/jqstewart1/mc-escher-stairs/

Your comment...