Turn Trash Into Treasure With This Car Tyre Stool

2 Materials
$30
4 Hours
Medium

I’d been looking for the perfect stool for my home and just hadn’t been able to find it. Then inspiration struck, why not make it myself? I had seen a few different versions of car tyre stools and decided to give it a shot. Tyres aren’t difficult to come by, and I love a project that makes use of things that are often discarded. This project is easily customizable to your space, just choose a fabric that works with your aesthetic. Follow my step-by-step tutorial and you’ll have a new seat for your guests in no time!

DIY Tire Stool
Car Tires

This project uses quite a few tools and materials, so make sure to read it thoroughly before you start.


Materials:

Old tyre

3 pieces of plywood

Pencil

Nail

Strip of wood

Jig saw

Four blocks of wood

Screws

Spray adhesive

Batting

2” thick foam

Faux leather (this was used for the seat of the stool, you can use a different fabric if you prefer)

Staples

Fabric

Pins

Hemming web

Black felt

Furniture legs


Tools:

Tape measure

Hammer

Drill

Electric screwdriver

Hack saw blade

Scissors

Staple gun

Utility knife

Iron

Measure the Tyre

Measure the Tire

The first thing I did was measure the inside diameter of the tyre. I added 1” to my measurement so that the plywood would sit on the lip of the tyre and not fall through. The last thing you want when someone sits down on your stool is for them to fall right through, so make sure that it fits snugly.

Cut Out Three Circles

Cut Out Three Circles

Once I had my measurements, I set out to cut three matching circles from my plywood. Two of these pieces will be used to create a more substantial structure inside the tyre, and the third will be used to create the cushion for the top of the stool. So how did I make a perfect circle without a compass? I’ll teach you a trick.

Put a Nail Through a Strip of Wood

First, take a strip of wood long enough to fit across the board. Hammer a nail into the middle of this wood so that it just pokes through the other side.

Measure the Radius

Next, measure the radius that you want from the nail to the end of the wood. Once you have the desired measurement, drill a hole big enough for a pencil to fit through.

Measure a Circle

Now, place the nail in the center of your plywood and measure a perfect circle by swiveling your homemade compass. The pencil will leave a clear mark for you to cut.

Repeat

Do this on three pieces of wood and cut them out with a jigsaw.

Build the Frame

Build the Frame

Using one of the circles, I found four equidistant edges of the circle and screwed a block into each one. I inserted this into the tyre. I may have overdone it when it comes to support, but it’s better to be safe than sorry when building something that will need to hold a person’s full weight.

The second circle will later be screwed to the other side to secure it in place, but first I had some upholstering to do.

Screw Together
Drop into the Tire

Attach Batting to the Tyre

Attach Batting to the Tire

I wanted my stool to look sumptuous and plush, so I decided to wrap the outside of it with batting before I upholstered it. Some tyre stool projects skip this step, and simply add a cushion to the top of the tyre, allowing the tyre to show in the finished project. That’s not the look that I was going for here. I lay out the batting and generously sprayed the tyre with spray adhesive.

Roll the Tire

Then I rolled the tyre along the batting, making sure to press it down and secure it in place.

Glue the Top

Once I was done with the sides, I flipped the tyre so that the top was facing me and secured the batting to the top of the stool with adhesive spray. In order to keep this part even and neat, I made cuts in the fabric so that I could fold it down in flaps.

Create the Cushion

Create the Cushion

Now I took my third plywood circle and attached 2” foam to the top of it with spray adhesive.

Cut off Excess Foam

Using a hack saw blade I cut away the excess foam.

Round with Scissors

Then I rounded and trimmed the top of the foam with scissors.

Lay Over Faux Leather

Next, I lay the cushion foam side down on some faux leather fabric.

Staple the Leather

Using a staple gun, I pulled and secured the fabric along four even parts on the underside of the cushion.

Pull and Staple

Then I continued to pull and secure the parts between what I had already stapled, pleated the fabric evenly as I went. It’s important that the folds are even so that the resulting cushion is smooth. Feel free to use as many staples as needed here as you don’t want any part of this to come undone.

Remove Excess Fabric

Once I had finished stapling the fabric, I flipped the cushion over to check that it was smooth and taut. Then I added a few more staples for good measure and cut away excess fabric from the middle using a utility knife. Don’t cut too close to the staples because it may cause them to come undone.

Trim

Upholster the Tyre

Upholster the Tire

If you chose not to cover the tyre itself you can skip this step, if not, then follow along. I lay out the fabric that I had chosen to cover my tyre.

Roll Along the Fabric

Then I rolled the tyre along the fabric and pinned it together.

Iron Together

With the fabric pinned, I slipped it off the tyre and stuck it together along the hem with hemming web. Hemming web is an easy iron-on solution to connect the fabric without having to pick up a needle. I didn’t want the hem to show so I took care to match the pattern.

Attach the Cover

Next, I slipped the cover over the tyre and stapled the top in place, using the same method I used for the cushion.

Attach the Cushion

Attach the Cushion

I lay the cushion so that the plywood was facing me and then lay the tyre on top of it, with the upholstered part on top. I screwed the tyre to the cushion at four points along the edge and one point in the middle of the plywood circle.

Attach the Bottom

Attach the Bottom

With the cushion side down, I took my third and final plywood circle and screwed it into place. This is where those blocks that I placed inside the tyre came in handy, as I was able to screw directly into them to secure the stool.

Cover the Bottom

Cover the Bottom

Now I had quite a bit of upholstery work to do along the bottom of the stool. First, I secured the batting with staples. It doesn’t have to be quite as neat here as the bottom of the stool will be out of sight. Even so, try to keep it as even as possible.

Repeat the Process

Then, I repeated the process with the fabric. I wanted the fabric to have an even tightness along the entire tyre, so I made sure to check as I went that I wasn’t pulling too tight or not tight enough on any given part.

Remove Excess Fabric

With the fabric and batting in place, I removed any excess with a utility knife, once again making sure to leave enough fabric for the staples to grab and hold in place.

Add Black Felt

I wanted it to be a bit cleaner, so I added some black felt to cover up the edges of the fabric and batting. I folded the edges under as I went so that I would have a clean edge.

Trim the Felt

Add Legs

Add Legs

All that was left to do was to add legs to my tyre stool. Because my stool was so low to the ground, I only needed three legs to do the trick. I measured to make sure that I was placing them at equal points along the edge of the stool, and then screwed them into place.

Modern DIY Tire Stools

Look at that, two beautiful stools that made use of oft discarded materials! Have you ever upcycled anything? Let me know in the comments!

Resources for this project:

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Have a question about this project?

3 questions
  • Lca30470566
    on Apr 28, 2020

    Question: Does it still smell like a tire?

  • Edie Burton
    on Apr 29, 2020

    Would like to try but tires DO stink. How would/ what would remove/cover/neutralize tire rubber smell?

  • Lin1263925
    on Apr 30, 2020

    I just love this your pattern choice is adorable ,however I wanted to ask where you got such adorable legs?

    • Eamon Walsh
      on May 2, 2020

      Thank you. I got off them some discarded furniture but the can be easily purchased online. Just type "chrome furniture legs" there are loads of different types and designs.

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