Asked on Jun 20, 2020

How do I clean a garage floor that is full of old oil stains??

Christine Anne PieperKathy Gunter LawHolly Lengner - Lost Mom
+12

Answered

I have lived in this apartment about 12 years and have had a couple of cars that leaked oil, not to mention the oil from the previous renters. Is there anything that will remove at least most of the oil from the cement floor?


11 answers
  • Hi there. You could check out this post. I've heard the kitty litter trick really works. https://www.guardiangarage.com/blog/tips-to-remove-oil-stains-on-your-garage-floor/

  • Betsy
    on Jun 20, 2020

    Hi Christine: What I have used, with great success I may add, is a product called L.A.'s Totally Awesome Cleaner. I sprayed it on an oil stain, let it sit over night and used Dawn and warm water to clean it off. It took 2 or 3 times, but it worked pretty good. First of all, I scraped up as much oil as I could and sprinkled kitty litter on the area and then covered that with a board. Next day, I swept it up and then did the Awesome Cleaner thing. Good news is it only costs a buck :) Good luck.

  • Cindy
    on Jun 20, 2020

    Hi Christine. You could use oven cleaner to remove old oil, grease and transmission fluid from your garage floor. Spray it on and let it set for 5 or 10 minutes. Then scrub with a stiff brush (not a wire brush that could scar the finish) and rinse it off with your garden hose at its highest pressure. Severe stains may require a second application. Good luck Christine. Hoping all is well with you.

  • Christine Anne Pieper
    on Jun 20, 2020

    Hi Kim. Thanks for the link, but I think they were trying to sell a sealer for the floor; didn't give any tips for cleaning that I could find. I appreciate the time you took to look that up for me.

  • Patty
    on Jun 20, 2020

    I am buying a product I found on Amazon called "Chomp Pull it Out" for Oil and Stains on concrete. It got good reviews. I am buying a smaller bottle but if it does a great job, I will do my entire garage floor.

    • Christine Anne Pieper
      on Jun 20, 2020

      Thanks Patty. I found a commercial product also called Goof Off. I have heard of the brand and I think it's a good one. I hope it works well on the oil, but some of the stains are so old I'm wondering if they will ever come off. We shall see. Thank you for your suggestion and I wrote it down in case this doesnt' work.

  • Peggy Burnette
    on Jun 20, 2020

    Hi Christine, sorry you have old oil stains on your garage floor. I hope this video will help you get it clean. ow do you remove old oil stains from garage floor?

    0:33

    4:13

    Suggested clip · 106 seconds


    How to Remove an Oil Stain from Concrete - YouTube

    www.youtube.com › watch



    Search for: How do you remove old oil stains from garage floor?

  • William
    on Jun 20, 2020

    WD-40. Did a leaky oil pan leave a big ugly spot in the middle of your concrete driveway? To get rid of an unsightly oil spot, just spray it with a generous amount of WD-40 and then hose it down with water.


    Soda (Coca Cola). Here’s how to remove oil stains from concrete drive-ways and garage floors: Gather up a small bag of cat litter, a few cans of cola, a stiff bristle broom, bucket, laundry detergent, bleach, eye protection, and rubber gloves. Cover the stain with a thin layer of cat litter and brush it in. Sweep up the litter and pour cola to cover the area. Work the cola in with a bristle broom, and leave the cola for about twenty minutes. Mix 1/4 cup laundry detergent with 1/4 cup bleach in 1 gallon (3.7 liters) warm water and use it to mop up the mess.


    Oven Cleaner. Get those unsightly grease, oil, and transmission fluid stains off your concrete driveway or garage floor. Spray them with Easy Off No Fume Oven Cleaner in the BLUE can. Let it settle for 5-10 minutes, then scrub with a stiff brush and rinse it off with your garden hose at its highest pressure. Severe stains may require a second application.


    Kool-Aid. Nasty rust stains on your concrete? Mix unsweetened lemonade Kool-Aid with hot water. Scrub and the rust stain should come right out.


    Baking Soda. Salt and commercial ice-melt formulations can stain — or actually eat away — the concrete around your house. For an effective, but completely innocuous, way to melt the ice on your steps and walkways during those cold winter months, try sprinkling them with generous amounts of baking soda. Add some sand for improved traction.


    Ammonia. Tired of those annoying discolorations on your concrete work? To get rid of them, scrub with 1 cup ammonia diluted in 1 gallon (3.7 liters) water. Hose it down well when you’re done.

    • Christine Anne Pieper
      on Jun 20, 2020

      My goodness William, you sure put some time in your answer didn't you. Or are you speaking from experience? Either way I appreciate the variety of answers and decide on one that I think might work. They were all very helpful suggestions and I thank you for the time it took you to research this.

  • Vimarhonor
    on Jun 20, 2020

    We have a newer concrete driveway that sometimes gets abused by contractors or service personnel. We try to observe and remove these oil stains ASAP. We use TSP for large areas or areas not treated immediately or this Easy off spray for stains we catch right away. Scrub with a stiff plastic kitchen type brush and rinse with water. Remember to wear personal protection as labels might direct.


    • Vimarhonor
      on Jun 20, 2020

      When you have a newer driveway these unwelcomed stains shows up unexpectedly. These two common household products at work for us. I hope you find the perfect solution for your oily stains.

  • Holly Lengner - Lost Mom
    on Jun 20, 2020

    Kitty litter soaks up oil and grease from a floor before cleaning. You can also buy cleaning solutions from automotive stores.

  • Kathy Gunter Law
    on Jun 22, 2020

    Start with oil dry or cat litter. Let it sit and hopefully it will pull some of the oils up and out. After that go with a harsh degreaser like purple power and either pressure wash or high power wand on your hose.

  • Christine Anne Pieper
    on Jun 26, 2020

    Thank you both--Kathy Gunter Law and Holly Lengner - Lost mom. For your suggestions. Since I have a cat I should have known to try the litter first. I will do that when I'm ready to start the floor. Thanks again to both of you for taking the time to answer.

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