Asked on Oct 6, 2020

How to raise a floor?

Naomie Moore aka baileyanddaisey, Castaic CAWilliamBecky at Flipping the Flip
+13

Answered

how can you raise a floor? From my kitchen to my living room there are 2 steps. I would like to raise the living room floor to match my kitchen floor. As i live in Wisconsin and our winters are very cold and the living room gets very cold, we have to sit with blankets around us, i would like to know if we could put a heating element under the floor to keep it cozy.


16 answers
  • Kathy Gunter Law
    Kathy Gunter Law
    on Oct 6, 2020

    You can basically lay a grid of supports on the lower floor, then sub flooring, and finally flooring. You will have to make sure that you have sufficient height to support a new floor with the supports.

  • You should consult with a licensed contractor before doing anything, but it sounds like radiant heat in the floor might be a good option for you. Here's a link that ells you more about it:

    https://www.thisoldhouse.com/heating-cooling/21015149/radiant-floor-heating

  • Cynthia H
    Cynthia H
    on Oct 6, 2020

    Hi! I think this video has some good information for you. Good luck and stay safe!

  • Unique Creations By Anita
    Unique Creations By Anita
    on Oct 7, 2020

    Here is some info to help you. https://youtu.be/NZGyfynqSgY

  • Janice
    Janice
    on Oct 7, 2020

    Hi Kathy, what you are thinking of doiong can certainly be done. Here's a video about house to raise the level of a floor. You could insulate the area well and that would help. There are also likely ways to have some sort of heat source included but it's not addressed here.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tBAv4s5pKe8


  • All excellent suggestions! Just know this will not be a small project and has a price tag to go with it, although Wisconsin has much more friendly prices. In floor heating is glorious, you will want it in the rest of the house after having it through one winter. If you want it for this year, you better jump on it now! With construction and inspection schedules, product shipment delays, etc., it could take several weeks. Be prepared to live in a construction zone as well, everything will be dusty in spite of the taping off part of the house. Make sure they cover any existing HVAC vents or the contractor will have to pay to have those cleaned for you. Also use licensed contractors, as if you don't and something goes amiss, your homeowners insurance carrier will deny the claim. You need a good GC as well as an electrician to move all the outlets and any other wires you may have in your walls for modern technology. Don't forget the floor registers as well depending upon the age of the home. Be sure you understand everything before you sign the contract.


    Here is how to hire a contractor and payment schedule. NEVER pay a contractor all the money up front, the guy is unlicensed and a scam or con man.


    https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0242-hiring-contractor


    As you can see, this isn't just a "point and pay" project. Serious decisions will need to be made quickly (and I mean on the spot or overnight) if changes or modifications need to be made.


    Don't want to scare you, just be aware of what is ahead of you. The more educated you are about the process the better.

  • Johnavallance82
    Johnavallance82
    on Oct 7, 2020

    Hello there,

    Before considering doing this project, call in the Professionals for a quote for Price, Time Scale. Get more than one quote for comparison. Then you will be under no illusion about the task in hand and the possible costs in time and money! Best of luck! You might consider putting Foil or insulation board under your carpet and then just overlay that with floor boards....

  • Flipturn
    Flipturn
    on Oct 7, 2020

    Naomie is right about being covered with sawdust if you are going to undertake a construction project such as raising a sunken floor. Even if it is possible to put up 'plastic walls' for the duration, expect the mess to permeate into your remaining living space.


    That being said, raising the floor should help eliminate much of the cold feeling on the floor, as cold air travels downward (hot air rises).

  • Flipturn
    Flipturn
    on Oct 7, 2020

    To address the cold feeling on a sunken floor, as a less expensive or temporary alternative to having the floor raised, I would suggest that you purchase either portable baseboard heaters, or install some with a wall switch on a timer.

  • Pat
    Pat
    on Oct 7, 2020


    We just raised our TV room 8 inches up to match our kitchen floor. We did this so a wheel chair bound person could go all over the house. Our sons did the work and looks like Chas' Crazy Creations picture showed. We put carpet down over the raised floor and put the baseboard heater back in the room. Love it without the steps.

  • This is likely doable. You'll surely need a permit and you'll need to discuss any code issues with your building department. You can lay down a radiant heat floor under the floor finish but you should also track down where else cold is coming in from by caulking and sealing up areas where you can.

  • William
    William
    on Oct 8, 2020

    Chas' Crazy Creations video is perfect. That's what I did to raise the floor on a covered porch to convert it into a bedroom. I also added fiberglass insulation before covering with sheathing.

  • And one more thing. Don't forget to address all doorways, they will need to be reworked as well. Details . . . Details.

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