Do you think builders/contractors benefit from getting a woman's perspective?


I was recently hired by some friends of ours to work alongside their builder in the reconstruction of their fire-destroyed home (no one was hurt!). The wife has entrusted me with the responsibility of being her "voice" when it comes to elements in the design that need a female's input and I think the builder and I make a great team as a result. So, what do you think? Is it important for a builder/contractor to have a woman's perspective in the process of building or remodeling a home? I'd love to hear from you! ~Vanessa
http://www.atthepicketfence.com/2012/05/picket-fence-project.html
do you think builders contractors benefit from getting a woman s perspective, home improvement
do you think builders contractors benefit from getting a woman s perspective, home improvement
do you think builders contractors benefit from getting a woman s perspective, home improvement
At The Picket Fence

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2 of 29 comments
  • Cheryl
    on Jul 21, 2012

    A woman's input is absolutely necessary. I see so many things done by builders, installers w/o any thought as to who and how many will use a space. How about using all that wasted wood to reinforce areas around windows for drapery rods. How about making towel bars 32 inches so can be set in studs instead of the silly 14 inch ones everyone pulls out of drywall. All the towels are bigger today and I want mine to dry between uses. How about doors at least 38 wide in case someone becomes disabled. How about adequate closet spaces? In the bath quit putting soap dishes right in the path of the shower! Ditto shelving for shampoo, etc. I want a bench in there instead of risking life and limb to shave my legs and those 36 in sq showers are horrible. Stairs and Slick tile flooring in the bath are a recipe for an accident or death in the bath. Deeper sinks to keep water from splashing everywhere! Power flush commodes and higher seats because the low ones are hell for bad knees, hips, backs and it is not just older people w such problems. Pull out shelving, divided storage for pot, pans, bakeware. It just goes on and on.

  • Linda T
    on Jul 21, 2012

    My partner built a shower wide enough for a wheel chair, with a tile seat that he put the hot pipe through, so it's warm when you sit on it. The toilet is higher than normal, and there are grab bars next to it, and in the shower. We also put louvered, sprung, double doors on the outside, to be able to push in or out.

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