Louise
Louise
  • Hometalker
Asked on Oct 19, 2012

I have two pots of caladiums outside my front door. I read they won't survive the winter out there, so can I bring them

Sharron WLiz HollandDouglas Hunt
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Answered

inside, and then will they live and thrive until spring? If so, will they then continue to live outside and do well until next fall? And if I bring them inside, what night temp will require that? Is there anything special I have to do to keep them well inside over the winter?
q i have two pots of caladiums outside my front door i read they won t survive the, gardening
8 answers
  • Jeanette S
    on Oct 20, 2012

    From my experience, caladiums do better if you will take them out of the soil for the winter. When they start to look bad, dig them out, cut off the tops and wash them well. Then lay them out in the shade for a day or so to dry and then bring onto a porch or in the garage and lay them on newspaper. They will dry quickly...then just get a small box and lay them on newspaper. You can layer them. I always stick mine under my bed. The girls I worked with laughed at me (well, we laughed together) about my bulbs being under my bed! But I love them enough to take the time to do this. I have to wear gloves when handling these because they make me sting!

  • Douglas Hunt
    on Oct 20, 2012

    Caladiums go through a natural period of dormancy in the winter, Louise, so even if you brought them indoors, you would soon have what looked like an empty pot. Jeanette's advice is spot-on. Make sure you store them in a warm place, and don't plant them outside in the spring until the ground warms up.

  • Louise
    on Oct 20, 2012

    OK, so after doing the removing from the soil, washing, drying, etc., I could put them in a box and store them inside somewhere, right? That sounds pretty easy. Thanks!!

  • 360 Sod (Donna Dixson)
    on Oct 21, 2012

    Just be sure to keep them cool and dry and you should be fine. You can use shredded paper from your shredder or saw dust, something like that to absorb any moisture.

  • Sharron W
    on Oct 21, 2012

    I've already dug mine and have them in paper sacks....and some elephant ears as well...when you say "keep them warm" what temperature are we taking about? I keep them in the garage and even though I keep a heater out there it probably gets about 50 in there.... If I have to keep them inside the house that is going to be more problematic...LOL

  • Douglas Hunt
    on Oct 21, 2012

    I've read that they don't like temps below 60 degrees, but if your garage doesn't get below 50, I wouldn't worry about it.

  • Liz Holland
    on Oct 23, 2012

    I know the soil must be warmed up before they will sprout again. A few weeks before spring you can set the pots of soil on a warming mat and that will speed them up. I plant mine in a large planter outside and I always get impatient for them to come up, usually I have almost given up and there they go. I also overwinter my bulbs in mesh onion bags and hang them in a cool dry place. I lve in N. Central Florida.

  • Sharron W
    on Oct 23, 2012

    OHHHHH Mesh Onion bags.... Now that's a good idea....I just bought apples and have two,,,,that's probably better than my paper sack... I love the "heating pad" idea too... I only have these because my FIL gave them to me...but I have grown to really love them and would like to do my best to keep them alive, especially since he has now passed.

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