Heather Hess
Heather Hess
  • Hometalker
  • Olympia, WA

Framed Poster Size Art Under $10

$10
Easy

Design Problem: My living room has 10 foot ceilings and a bay window on the main wall. This wall is the focal point of the room so I decided to flank the bay window with bookcases. I used 2 bookcases from Target that I already had. They are simple and get the job done, however they are short so they looked ridiculous compared to my tall window and ceiling. FYI: new and taller bookcases were not in my budget.
framed poster size art under 10, crafts, how to, living room ideas, repurposing upcycling
Design Solution: I decided to add some height by placing frames on top of the bookcases. Using cheap $9 poster frames from Walmart, spray paint, my printer and some craft paint, I created coordinating and unique art and solved my design dilemma.
framed poster size art under 10, crafts, how to, living room ideas, repurposing upcycling
Materials Needed:
framed poster size art under 10, crafts, how to, living room ideas, repurposing upcycling
1. Poster Frame
2. Posterboard
3. Spray Paint
4. Printer
5. Pen
6. Scissors
7. Craft Paint
Step 1: Spray Paint. Wal-Mart sells poster frames for under $10. The frame is plastic and black. I'm not going to lie, they are cheap looking but nothing spray paint can't fix. The frame slides out into strips which makes it easy to paint. I used my favorite Rust-oleum metallic gold spray paint and painted the strips.
framed poster size art under 10, crafts, how to, living room ideas, repurposing upcycling
Step 2: Print Quote. I used Microsoft Word to create the wording and font I wanted and printed it out on thin, normal printer paper.
framed poster size art under 10, crafts, how to, living room ideas, repurposing upcycling
Step 3: Cut Out Poster Board. Cut out a piece of poster board to fit your frame exactly.
Step 4: Trace Quote. Line up your printed words onto your cut poster board. Once they are in the exact place you desire, trace the outline of the letters with a normal writing pen. Make sure to push hard enough to put an indent onto the poster board underneath.
framed poster size art under 10, crafts, how to, living room ideas, repurposing upcycling
framed poster size art under 10, crafts, how to, living room ideas, repurposing upcycling
Step 5: Paint Quote. Using craft paint and a thin paint brush, paint on your words. The pen indents will help keep your paint lines perfect and straight. Multiple coats may be needed.
framed poster size art under 10, crafts, how to, living room ideas, repurposing upcycling
Step 6: Place in Frame. Once the paint is dry, place finished poster board in frame. Large, easy and inexpensive!
framed poster size art under 10, crafts, how to, living room ideas, repurposing upcycling
framed poster size art under 10, crafts, how to, living room ideas, repurposing upcycling
Heather Hess

Want more details about this and other DIY projects? Check out my blog post!

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4 of 38 comments
  • Christina
    on Feb 4, 2015

    This looks lovely. However, I must share an easier method. No cutting necessary! After printing out the letters the size desired, turn over the printed paper to the back. Using a soft leaded pencil like those fat ones used for kindergartners, an ebony pencil, or a 4B artists pencil (you can find these in most stores that sell artists supplies). Trace the letters pressing hard on the back of the paper. You can even scribble the pencil over as long as the lead is solidly on top of the edge of the letters. Remember to use pressure. Hold the paper against a window if it is too hard to see. Then turn the paper to the front and lay it down on top of the surface you want to paint. Tape it down on the top or side but not all around. Trace over the edge of the letters pressing hard. The pressure should transfer the scribbled lead on the back onto the surface you will paint. It will come out light. If you need it darker, either darken the lead on the back or retrace the front pressing harder. Of course, there is always charcoal tracing/transfer paper found at art supply stores. Use this instead of scribbling on the back. Just place the charcoal paper darker side down on the painting surface, tape down, place the printed paper word side up and tape. Trace over the letters pressing hard.

  • Dorothy Abernathy
    on Feb 12, 2015

    Just a quick suggestion. You can use nail polish instead of craft paint. I've used nail polish I didn't care for on my nail as a substitute for craft paint on several things, such as the barrette that is currently holding back my hair. It's a good way to avoid trashing polish that doesn't compliment your skin tone. It works well on paper and cardboard unless you plan to bend them after they're dry. It will chip if you bend it but it stays beautiful between glass so I think I would work in this project.

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