Kimberlee
Kimberlee
  • Hometalker
  • Villa Rica, GA
Asked on Nov 16, 2012

Help identifying trees??

Douglas HuntMeagan GramlichKimberlee
+24

Answered

Hello! A little background: I'm renovating and rejuvenating my childhood home. I've moved back to the house left to me by my father and I'm completely renovating the inside (a 1950's ranch with an add-on) and landscaping the yard for what will be this homes' first makeover in over 35 years! I've become awesome handy with a drill as well as a garden spade! I'm learning as I go and loving my home more all the time. It's our sanctuary.
Anyway,I'm I am working on clearing some of my yard for the spring plants and a swing set and I have some trees that I just can't decide what to do with. I like them but they're out of control. I don't know if I should prune or cut down. I think it would help if I knew what they were!
Any ideas? The first two are the same type of tree and the third is (I'm assuming) supposed to be a shrub that's taken over.
tree 1
tree 1
tree 2
tree 2
tree/shrub
tree/shrub
27 answers
  • Douglas Hunt
    on Nov 17, 2012

    How big are the first two? If they're not more than 10 feet or so, they look like they could be anise. Crush a leaf a see if is smells like licorice. I can't really make out any details in the third picture. Is it covered in black berries?

  • Kimberlee
    on Nov 17, 2012

    Hi Douglas, The first two are about 25-30 feet tall. They have red berries on them right now. The last one has black berries on them. I'll go try to get better pics.

  • Ellen H
    on Nov 17, 2012

    The dark berries in the 3rd pic make me think it's privet (ligustrum chinensis) - if so, it's very invasive. Privet has a rather small leaf, small white spring blooms that are extremely fragrant, evergreen foliage. Sounds like something you'd want but birds eat the berries and it comes up everywhere, including right up through desirable shrubs or blueberries, grows 6-10 ft per year in North Alabama. My husband pushed down some in some land he was clearing - he said they were 30 ft tall with trunks like trees instead of shrubs.

  • 360 Sod (Donna Dixson)
    on Nov 17, 2012

    I am reasonably certain it is a Cherry Laurel, not sure which one though http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prunus_laurocerasus

  • Kimberlee
    on Nov 17, 2012

    Here's some more pics for better identification. Ellen, I think you may be close on the privet. It is very invasive and even grows through concrete. Four Seasons, A type of Laurel may be right as well. I am still looking.

    , Specimen one and two closeup, Specimen one and two s trunk, specimen 3 close up, specimen 3 trunk
  • 360 Sod (Donna Dixson)
    on Nov 17, 2012

    mm it almost looks like two different plants. The one has opposite leaves vs alternate (the third pic) the first one looks alternate.hard to tell. If opposite is probably the privet because Cherry Laurel has alternate leaves.

  • Kimberlee
    on Nov 17, 2012

    the first and third "specimen" are two different plants. I just can't identify either. Sorry for the confusion.

  • Ellen H
    on Nov 17, 2012

    3rd one is privet. Get rid of it if you can.

  • Gail Salminen
    on Nov 18, 2012

    @Kimberlee We have a cheyenne privet that looks quite similar to this. Here (Ottawa Canada) we use it as a privacy hedge, but it does need regular trimming. We enjoy the privacy it gives it from our neighbours. Their deck is lower than ours and I always felt like we were over looking them before we grew it to 7 feet. It is healthy - with bone meal fertilizer annually, but it does require maintenance. When it gets too wide we either take some stalks out or just hack it back with the trimmers. The other leaf looks very familiar, will check some of my ideas and get back to you.

  • Kimberlee
    on Nov 18, 2012

    I think you guys are totally right about the Privet. I will be taking a saw to it soon! It is very invasive.Thank you all!!

  • Kimberlee
    on Nov 18, 2012

    Does the first specimen look like a type of rhododendron? I am still researching it. I honestly can't remember if flowers in the spring. I will have to watch it this year. But it definitely has the red "fruit" as pictured above.

  • Gail Salminen
    on Nov 18, 2012

    @Kimberlee - I would to tend to agree with your assessment of rhododendron. I can grow quite tall and there are a lot of varieties. Here is what wiki has to say about it. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhododendron

  • Douglas Hunt
    on Nov 19, 2012

    A rhododendron wouldn't have berries.

  • Kimberlee
    on Nov 19, 2012

    Oh!!! Well then. I'm back to square one!! LOLOLOL I haven't a clue. The leaves are kinda in a "spoke" pattern. I'm not sure if that word is even used in plant descriptions. Any ideas?

  • Douglas Hunt
    on Nov 19, 2012

    Four Season's suggestion of a cherry laurel is a possibility. Any sign of those red berries turning black?

  • Kimberlee
    on Nov 19, 2012

    I'll go check and let you know. BBS.

  • I believe they may be Bayberry. (Myrica) They are invasive as the will grow from rhizomes and spread. They are a deer resistant plant due to the fragrant leaves. The berries can be from grey to blue to purple depending on the variety. They are related to myrtles. The berries have medicinal uses

  • The middle picture could be Ligustrum (privet) or Kalmia Latifolia (mountain laurel) hard to distinguish from the picture.

  • Kimberlee
    on Nov 19, 2012

    I looked all over the trees and didn't see any black berries. :( Maybe the red ones will turn black. I am not sure. I'll let you know.

  • The Blooming Gardener
    on Nov 19, 2012

    I think: <Ponds Patios and Waterfal... Manchester, MD The middle picture could be ~~ or Kalmia Latifolia (mountain laurel)> : has the correct ID with Kalmia latifolia, but here's a link to see if that is it...Which it is worth keeping if it is...IMO, http://www.hort.uconn.edu/plants/k/kallat/kallat1.html

  • Gail Salminen
    on Nov 20, 2012

    @Kimberlee and @Douglas Hunt - I am not an expert in this area. I have never seen berries on a rhododendron, but I was curious and went trolling the net LOL This may just be a case of mistaken identity by the photographer, but here is a site that depicts the berries, they seem quite firm like those of the holly plant, so not sure. Maybe @Douglas Hunt can differentiate?? http://snapt.abul.us/Project365/2011/04/07/365-day-photo-project-day-342-ripe-red-rhododendron-berries/

  • Douglas Hunt
    on Nov 20, 2012

    I think the photographer has it wrong. I'm hardly a rhododendron expert, but I have never seen berries on one. Mountain laurel is an interesting suggestion. I never think of that below the north Georgia mountains, but that doesn't mean someone couldn't have successfully planted them. If so, there would have been a memorable show of flowers in the spring, and they would definitely be worth keeping.

  • Kimberlee
    on Apr 6, 2013

    sorry for the confusion. but since spring is slowly springing I've been informed the first two pics are Red Tipped Photinia. a basic shrub that, for me, has grown into an awesome tree. I like cool trunks! ;-) thanks everyone.

  • Douglas Hunt
    on Apr 6, 2013

    Be vigilant about keeping an eye out for fungal leaf spot.

  • Kimberlee
    on Apr 6, 2013

    is there a way to prevent it?

  • Meagan Gramlich
    on Apr 8, 2013

    I think the middle one is a magnolia tree

  • Douglas Hunt
    on Apr 8, 2013

    You're better off if that is a single plant than if it's in a hedge, Kimberee, because good air circulation is key. Make sure there is no overhead irrigation around the tree. Consider a regular spray program using copper sulphate.

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