Remodeling For Disabilities: Accessible Design


Are you familiar with Universal or Accessible Design?
It is a design focus that describes designing and building a home to accommodate its owner's physical needs for today and into the future. AK's designers are Certified Aging In Place Specialists (CAPS) which means they are professionally trained to design and build to the exacting standards that universal design concepts require.
AK designed a kitchen for an adult with progressive mobility issues. The kitchen was designed specifically to enable her to have access to the areas that she wanted to utilize; all the areas that she had been frustrated that she couldn't do things for herself or had to wait for her husband or son to address. No one wants to feel uncomfortable or incapable in their own home!
Read ALL the details of how and why AK created this kitchen design: http://www.akatlanta.com/Universal-Design-Kitchen-Remodel
Read ALL the details of how and why AK created this kitchen design: http://www.akatlanta.com/Universal-Design-Kitchen-Remodel
Read ALL the details of how and why AK created this kitchen design: http://www.akatlanta.com/Universal-Design-Kitchen-Remodel
Read ALL the details of how and why AK created this kitchen design: http://www.akatlanta.com/Universal-Design-Kitchen-Remodel
Read ALL the details of how and why AK created this kitchen design: http://www.akatlanta.com/Universal-Design-Kitchen-Remodel
Read ALL the details of how and why AK created this kitchen design: http://www.akatlanta.com/Universal-Design-Kitchen-Remodel
Read ALL the details of how and why AK created this kitchen design: http://www.akatlanta.com/Universal-Design-Kitchen-Remodel
Read ALL the details of how and why AK created this kitchen design: http://www.akatlanta.com/Universal-Design-Kitchen-Remodel
Read ALL the details of how and why AK created this kitchen design: http://www.akatlanta.com/Universal-Design-Kitchen-Remodel

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2 of 17 comments
  • Carolyn
    on Nov 21, 2016

    I've been remodeling our 1925 home ever since we bought it. Both my parents were handicapped and I learned life's lessons as they and my siblings and I lived it. New home ideas, plan a real pantry instead of all those upper cabinets. I hate climbing up to the upper cabinets in my home and find myself doing it less and less as I age. My grandmother had a full size pantry, no cabinets at all, a baking station with a pull out surface, a kitchen table to prep food, a small 2 foot wide dish cabinet. She was only - 4'5" tall and cut the legs off of wooden chairs so she could reach the floor. Mom was under 5' and dad eventually lost height to less than that. Their height reach and bending mobility were severely limited. Eventually only paper back-up product and occasionally used dishes were placed in top cabinets. They bought and used free standing 10" deep floor standing 6' tall cabinets and still couldn't reach the top. Visitors reach stuff down from there. Not everything will work for everyone. Money was not available for the new aids --disability barely covers essentials, and as adults, the children helped with extra services needed.

  • Carolyn
    on Nov 21, 2016

    PS, I've been researching aging-in-place, CAPS, NORC, multi-generational, ADA, universal design for years. Changes come slowly, professional changes can not be afforded by many who need it most. Plan ahead.

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