Donna P
Donna P
  • Hometalker
  • Gulf Breeze, FL
Asked on Jan 21, 2013

What paint is good to use for fiberboard cupboards & the ones with a contact type paper on them in my manufactured h

Alice MarieIvana CarmonJoyce
+23

Answered

I purchased a 1988 manufactured home in a senior citizen's park here in Navarre, Florida. I want to make some updates to the cupboards in the kitchen without replacing them as they are still in decent condition and I can't afford to spend much money on updates. I don't know what paint would be the best to use; especially the contact paper type stuff in my bathroom nor how to prep them for painting. I also don't want to make a major deal out of this project either.
This is what one of the cupboards in the kitchen look like.
This is what one of the cupboards in the kitchen look like.
This is one of the doors to the sink area in the kitchen.
This is one of the doors to the sink area in the kitchen.
this is one of the doors to the sink in the bathroom.
this is one of the doors to the sink in the bathroom.
The contact type paper stuff is pealing off on the bottom of the door to the sink in the bathroom.
The contact type paper stuff is pealing off on the bottom of the door to the sink in the bathroom.
25 answers
  • Designs by BSB
    on Jan 21, 2013

    Im afraid the answer here is not as budget friendly as you may wish for :( You are 2 evils .. exposed fiberboard and vinyl surface -- both respond to paint in completely opposite fashions. The edges -- would take/absorb an indefinite amount of paint. The doors? With a high quality primer, could easily chip/scrap later. I would recommend contacting a local cabinet shop or door replacement company to obtain a bid for replacement doors. Even an "MDF" (medium density fiberboard) painted door would be leaps and bounds ahead. It would give you the new kitchen/update you are looking for at a fraction of the cost.

  • 3po3
    on Jan 21, 2013

    This article by a Hometalk regular might help you: http://www.networx.com/article/about-cabinet-facing

  • Z
    on Jan 21, 2013

    If you don't want to go to the cost of having them refaced, I'm thinking you could seal the exposed pressed "wood" areas, then use paintable wall paper (bead board or pressed tin ceiling look) to cover all the flat surfaces leaving the raised frame as it is before priming and painting everything.

  • Donna P
    on Jan 21, 2013

    You guys are the best! I don't have the money to redo cupboards in the kitchen and bath YET, so painting them is my least expensive option right now since the wood look is horribly ugly. I hope it will last a few years until I can afford to put in new ones. The bathroom, however, needs more than just paint. Sealing the raw edges for the time being sounds like a plan and wallpapering the door inserts is a great idea! The sink is too low and I have to stoop over to use it and I am only 5' 4" tall! That part is going to be a major change as the counter top extends over the tub area as well. Thanks for the great ideas!

  • Donna P
    on Jan 21, 2013

    I still need help with what paint to use that will adhere to the surfaces. Should I use a semi-gloss, egg shell or satin paint? One that has a primer in it already? I don't want to get started with one paint and have to stop and use something else. I will post what it looks like when I am done once I figure this part out with your help. I can't wait to give it a whirl! I am also putting on new inexpensive hardware. I know this isn't the ideal solution but ANYTHING is better than what they look like now.

    • Annie Doherty
      on Aug 14, 2016

      Donna if you use a decent primer like Zinsser's bullseye 123 or other comparable makes, it will give the desired effect. As this product is brilliant on your type of doors or melamine faced furniture, metal, wood almost anything. Degrease then paint with primer when dry use a good quality Eggshell paint or equivalent . This finish should not peel or chip and is washable, I use an oil based Eggshell but that's just my preference, as my household has children, teens adults and dogs and this finish lasts. Good luck with your project, you have plenty of great information and help from your fellow Hometalkers.

  • Donna P
    on Jan 21, 2013

    (see my last post)

  • Z
    on Jan 21, 2013

    I'm probably not the best person to suggest what products would work best, but I'll tag a coupe members that should know. @Peace Painting Co., Inc. @Woodbridge Environmental Tiptophouse.com You can also paint your hardware to save money until you do a whole remake.

  • MaryEllen Valiquette
    on Jan 21, 2013

    how can I replace the guts inside the toilet.

  • Z
    on Jan 21, 2013

    @MaryEllen Valiquette to ask a question scroll to the top of any page and click on the "post/ask" button.

  • Peace Painting Co., Inc.
    on Jan 21, 2013

    Take a sanding sponge and scour the loose, fluffy stuff off then clean everything well with a cleaner that will take off grease. You may need to trim off any loose paper edges with a razor blade. Then wipe them down with a clean, damp sponge rinsing regularly. At that point you are ready for any good quality primer and finish coat paint. Best, Charles

  • Z
    on Jan 21, 2013

    Thank you @Charles.

  • Donna P
    on Jan 22, 2013

    Thank you Charles! I appreciate your help.

  • The Robin's Nest
    on Jan 22, 2013

    I have had good success using Zinsser Bullseye 123 for priming presswood and laminate surfaces. you will need to prep/clean up the raw exposed areas as mentioned above, by sanding and or trimming back any exposed material. What you DON'T want is for them to suck up any paint or primer, as they will swell and really get messed up. The paintable wall paper is available at Lowe's and probably Home Depot. If you are daring you might even consider applying a brown paper bag treatment to them. I think if you chose this method, you could cover the entire cabinet door surfaces and not just the inserts. This can be researched online by googling "brown craft paper flooring" this is a unique application with a great finished look and cost wise you will come out probably about the same as the paintable wall coverings. If you have a hobby lobby nearby you can get rolls of the plain, heavy duty, brown craft paper there. some elmers glue, stain of the color of your liking, and a can or two of poly and you are golden. Skill wise, this process is pretty easy, it is time consuming. You will also need to prime first to assure a good seal and adhesion.

  • Peace Painting Co., Inc.
    on Jan 22, 2013

    You are so welcome Becky and Donna.. It's possible the real spongy areas will need an extra coat of primer.

  • Julie
    on Jan 23, 2013

    I am needing to do the same thing. Please post when your project is finished, so I will know how it works for you. Thanks for being the guinea pig!

  • Donna P
    on Jan 23, 2013

    I am going to begin the project this weekend. It will take a few weeks to finally get it done because of other commitments. I can't wait to see how it turns out!

  • Z
    on Jan 24, 2013

    Good luck Donna! Make sure to take notes and progress pictures.

  • Doris
    on Jun 26, 2014

    Just finished remodeling a 1985 double wide and we used polyseamseal caulk plus as glue to stick down the curling paper edges....and because our prior owners had kept cats that sprayed we used a shellac based primer to seal in all odors... I chose to use durhams rock hard, powder product , and mixed it with Elmer's glue...for sticking.... to resurface the edges where the particle board was showing. This gave a surface that could then be sanded without just creating more ragged particle board...good luck with your project

  • Adelaide Gargiulo
    on Feb 9, 2015

    Donna, I have the same type of cabinets,but mine aren't peeling yet. I taped something to one of them and when I took it off the paper (whatever) came with it. The man at the hardware store asked me if I could just take the paper off, then prime and paint with a semi-gloss or gloss paint whichever I preferred. I haven't done it yet. I have an idea ... why not try something on the inside of a cabinet (one you don't open often) and see what works best. That's what I'm going to do.

  • Diana Deiley
    on Feb 7, 2016

    Tough situation. Love all the suggestions so far. Not sure if you have finished your project, but you could just remove the doors for an open concept. For lower cabinets I'd suggest looking at Habitat and at other local thrift stores for doors. You never know what you can find that you can repurpose. Best of luck.

  • the problem with those that you pictured is they got water damage. anytime water hits that fiberboard, it causes it to swell. That's why you have the peeling. It will never go back to normal. fiberboard is just sawdust and glue that's compressed. get it wet, and it acts like a sponge. I don't know if paint will make it look any better but you can try.

  • Lukejakeleahsnama
    on Mar 1, 2016

    I purchased a mobile home built in the mid 70's. It was awful! Same kind of dark paneling everywhere. I primed with Zinser (sp) primer from Home Depot, then used a regular indoor satin finish water based paint. You wouldn't believe how good it looks! I used white gloss on the kitchen and bath cabinets. Just seal it first. Believe me - paint hides a multitude of sins. If you can afford to replace these cabinet doors that are damaged, go for it. If money is an issue - paint everything!!! I thought I was going to have to replace all my kitchen cabinets, but that was almost 10 years ago and it still looks fantastic.

  • Joyce
    on Mar 2, 2016

    I agree with Luke

  • Ivana Carmon
    on Jul 13, 2016

    You can sand it enough to flatten the spots that have gotten wet, then clean real well with window cleaner. Take off the doors and hardware, then paint with a good quality chalk paint, then use the wax that the paint suggests. I just did mine (thanks to all the help I received from here) and I am totally in love! I did my frame in a couple of shades of gray darker than the doors, and changed out the hardware to a brushed stainless steel look to match my appliances. My next door neighbor was on vacation when I did them and she thought we had purchase new "high-end" cabinets!! The chalk paint goes on smooth and covers really well, and the wax is super easy, be sure and follow directions and best thing is everything cleans up with soap and water.

  • Alice Marie
    on Jan 20, 2017

    Getting ready to do my bathroom cabiets with chalk paint. I hear the white doesnt go on so well. Thanks for the encouragement. I have the 90s premolded sink and had issues with tube and tile epoxy but hope last coat will be a charm. I was worried about paper covered fiberboar. At least front and doors look like real wood
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