Alexis @ Chemistry Cachet
Alexis @ Chemistry Cachet
  • Hometalker
  • Granbury, TX

How to Pot Hibiscus Step by Step


I'm back with another installment on potted hibiscus! Last time, I shared with you five EASY tips to caring for your potted hibiscus. Today, I am sharing with you a step by step guide on how to pot it. Potting a hibiscus is just as important as how you care for it! As a scientist, I have experimented and researched for the past eight years how these plants thrive best! So, these are my five simple steps on how you need to pot your beautiful hibiscus! Feel free to follow my blog so you can access more of these easy tips I share.
how to pot hibiscus step by step, container gardening, flowers, gardening, hibiscus, how to
These five simple steps are easy for anyone to follow. You don't have to know anything about gardening!
how to pot hibiscus step by step, container gardening, flowers, gardening, hibiscus, how to
Step 1: Choose a pot that is at least triple the size of your plant.
how to pot hibiscus step by step, container gardening, flowers, gardening, hibiscus, how to
Step 2: Proper drainage is very important for a water loving hibiscus!
how to pot hibiscus step by step, container gardening, flowers, gardening, hibiscus, how to
how to pot hibiscus step by step, container gardening, flowers, gardening, hibiscus, how to
For the rest of the detailed steps visit my blog below! Let me know if you have any questions too.

Top Hometalk Projects

31 Creative Garden Features Perfect For Summer
15 Genius Curtain Ideas To Instantly Upgrade Your Space
The 15 Coolest Ways to Reuse Pipes in Your Home Decor
29 Of The Best DIY Mirror Projects Ever Made
15 Genius Curtain Ideas To Instantly Upgrade Your Space
21 Ways to Have More Polka Dots in Your Life
31 Amazing Furniture Flips You Have to See to Believe
21 Totally Terrific Things You Can Do With Doilies
31 Super Cute & Easy DIY Ideas For Your Kitchen
15 Pieces Of Furniture That DIYers Built From Scratch
30 Unusual & Helpful Gardening Tips You'll Want To Know
Creative Parents Share These Brilliant Kids' Project Ideas
15 Genius Curtain Ideas To Instantly Upgrade Your Space
The Easiest Ways to Grow a Bumper Crop of Tomatoes
If Your Stairway Walls Are Empty, Here Are 25 Ways To Change Them Now!
Alexis @ Chemistry Cachet

Want more details about this and other DIY projects? Check out my blog post!

Go

Have a question about this project?

1 question
  • Noe5542345
    on Apr 10, 2016

    Have you ever tried growing an Hibiscus from a cutting? I have had no luck !What am I doing wrong?

    • Alexis @ Chemistry Cachet
      on Apr 10, 2016

      I have done this a few times. It was hard to get them to root with our really hot weather, but the last time I did it, it worked. I soaked the cutting in some root hormone, placed it in really damp soil, then back filled with more potting soil. I tried the plastic bag method which is just wrapping the cuttings in a plastic bag, which creates a green house affect. I kept the soil damp and it took about 6 weeks, but they finally got some roots. I just repotted it after that and it did fairly well all season. I am not sure what methods you have tried, but maybe one of these can help for the next time! If you live in a warm area, I would also keep those cuttings in the shade so they don't get too hot.

Join the conversation

3 of 4 comments
  • Alexis @ Chemistry Cachet
    on Jun 16, 2015

    Yes absolutely! Anything to keep it lighter :) I use wood pieces too. I'm a chemist so I like to use biodegradable if I can. I listed some winter tips on my blog post, I know many people live in colder climates. I winter mine inside by a window with sunlight & light watering. Although in Texas, our big weather killer is the heat! Hoping we don't have too bad of a summer this year though. Thanks for reading!

  • Cathy Conran-Warmels
    on May 17, 2016

    I live in Michigan in zone 5. can I leave my hibiscus in a pot outside if it's planted like this or do I move it into the garage for the winter.

    • Alexis @ Chemistry Cachet
      on May 17, 2016

      @Cathy Conran-Warmels You will definitely want to move it in the garage in the winter. I always move mine there also in the winter. They don't do well during heavy freezes. In Texas, we don't get much of that, but I still play it safe. This past winter, I moved all my large ones into the garage. They went dormant after awhile and I brought them out again in early spring. The come back to life very quick in the sunshine with plenty of water :)

Your comment...