Can anyone tell me the name of this house plant please ?

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I have had this plant for best part of 15 yrs now, its only ever flowered once. The flowers are amazing, almost rubbery. They come in clusters of around 8-10 little white & pink star shaped flowers, which let off the most gorgeous scent & have little water droplets on!! Basically this is this plants life story- My step mother gave me this plant when I was in my 20's (I am 40 now), it used to live in a beaded shell hanging thing & was entwined all up & though it & hung very happily from a hook in the ceiling, it flowered just the once. My best friend at the time thought it be good idea to 'Re Plant' it into a bigger pot (& it still remains in that bigger pot which is not overly huge still) It has never flowered or even grown at all ever since she did that 15 odd yrs ago, but nor has it died? Its almost like its laying dormant? I am now married & often tell my husband & kids that it used to flower & that the flowers are really amazing, I often get the feeling that neither one believes me as they have NEVER even witnessed it grow a single new leaf :) I refuse to give up on this old plant of mine & would actually LOVE to show the disbelievers in our house what this plant's true potential can be. PLEASE HELP xx
q house plant id, gardening, home decor, I have had this plant for best part of 15 yrs now its only ever flowered once The flowers are amazing almost rubbery They come in clusters of around 8 10 little white pink star shaped flowers which let off the most gorgeous scent have little water droplets on Basically this is this plants life story My step mother gave me this plant when i was in my 20 s am 40 now it used to live in a beaded shell hanging thing was entwined all up though it hung very happily from a hook in the ceiling it flowered just the once My best friend at the time thought it be good idea to Re Plant it into a bigger pot stil remains in that bigger pot which is not overly huge stil It has never flowered or even grown at all ever since she did that 15 odd yrs ago but nor has it died Its almost like its laying dormant I am now married often tell my husband kids that it used to flower that the flowers r really amazing i often get the feeling that neither 1 believe me as have NEVER even witnessed it grow a single new leaf I refuse to give up on this old plant of mine would actually LOVE to show the disbelievers in our house what this plants true potential can be PLEASE HELP xx
I have had this plant for best part of 15 yrs now , its only ever flowered once . The flowers are amazing , almost rubbery . They come in clusters of around 8-10 little white & pink star shaped flowers , which let off the most gorgeous scent & have little water droplets on !! Basically this is this plants life story - My step mother gave me this plant when i was in my 20's (am 40 now) ,it used to live in a beaded shell hanging thing & was entwined all up & though it & hung very happily from a hook in the ceiling , it flowered just the once . My best friend at the time thought it be good idea to 'Re Plant' it into a bigger pot (& stil remains in that bigger pot which is not overly huge stil) It has never flowered or even grown at all ever since she did that 15 odd yrs ago , but nor has it died ? Its almost like its laying dormant ? I am now married & often tell my husband & kids that it used to flower & that the flowers r really amazing , i often get the feeling that neither 1 believe me as have NEVER even witnessed it grow a single new leaf :) I refuse to give up on this old plant of mine & would actually LOVE to show the disbelievers in our house what this plants true potential can be . PLEASE HELP xx
  48 answers
  • Katerina Kamaradova Katerina Kamaradova on Jun 21, 2015
    This is Hoya plant, you can find tips on how to take care of on the internet. As a child i remember it flowering but i was said that it is not very often...i also have my own at home and maybe once we "witnessed" 😉 Good luck with your one
  • Dianne H Dianne H on Jun 21, 2015
    Yes its a Hoya plant nicked name wax plant. It does best in a high light and does not like to be too moist. Don't know but looks like something is on it those white specks could be mealy bugs.
  • Rose Rose on Jun 21, 2015
    I have one to and has only ever had one flower. The white spots are in the leaf( not bugs)I have mine on the top of the china cabinet,I guess I should move it,The flowers are waxy looking and have like a sweet coating on them,I have seen them hanging and growing up on a small trellis inside the house.
  • Faye Campbell Faye Campbell on Jun 21, 2015
    My Hoya has those white spots on the waxy leaves. It's part of the leaf colouring. The star shaped flower cluster releases it's highly scented fragrance only at night because it requires moths to pollinate. I've actually cut off the gorgeous flower clusters (there were three on the vine this late spring) because the emitted smell is so powerful. I hated to do it but couldn't tolerate the sweet smell. Now there's another cluster appearing. I had the plant 7 years before it bloomed the first time. The plant really thrives well in my solarium (east and south exposure). I've been watering my plants with egg shell water and they LOVE it!! Place shells from hard boiled eggs in a WELL sealed container with water. The nutrients from the egg shells are released into the water and act as a fertilizer for plants. I discard the shells every two weeks and start again as the smell can get pretty high. No shortage of egg shells here because my husband has a hard boiled egg for breakfast every day. I've started new Hoya plants by removing a leaf from the mother plant, dipping the end of the stem in Root Grow and leaving it in a shot glass to grow roots (sunny environment) and then planting it in a very small pot filled with indoor potting soil.
  • Kim Kim on Jun 21, 2015
    Ours has flowered once in 13 years. The flowers are very fragarent, and look like porcelian. right now, I am fighting to get hard shelled bugs off it. I have used the soapy water, but just taking them off seems the best way.
    • See 2 previous
    • Anne Fitzpatrick Anne Fitzpatrick on Jun 21, 2015
      It is a Hoya, & I love the smell!
  • Kathleen Conery Kathleen Conery on Jun 21, 2015
    I have one too... for several years it bloomed regularly, but it's been years now. I have read that if you cut off the nubs that the flowers grow on it won't flower there again. Maybe I'll try giving it some eggshells and a little more light.
  • Evelyn Ann Evelyn Ann on Jun 21, 2015
    Starting another plant is easy and may be helpful for flowering. Just break off a stem and put it in water until it grows roots, then put it in a good soil and it will grow. I have had my mother plant for thirty years and have started many new ones to give to friends.
    • See 3 previous
    • Mary Tonningsen Mary Tonningsen on Jun 23, 2015
      It's amazing how many plants you can get started just by sticking a cutting in a glass of water! Hope it works for you. :)
  • Vicki Gay Vicki Gay on Jun 21, 2015
    I have a Hoya that is over 30 years old and massive. Just from experience I have found that they like bright areas and to be somewhat root bound. Every other week or so I give her a weak solution of miracle grow plant food and have been rewarded with 6-8 bloom clusters.
  • Darlene Simpson Darlene Simpson on Jun 21, 2015
    I also have this plant. We call it a Hoya. It likes lots of light and I put Miracle Grow on it every time I water. It blooms every year and grows like crazy.
  • Mimi Haywood Mimi Haywood on Jun 21, 2015
    I was told the Hoya needed to be forced to bloom by drying out somewhat before it would bloom, I was given a start from a plant that had gotten extremely large and had hundreds of blooms on it.
  • Marcia@Kalama Marcia@Kalama on Jun 21, 2015
    I think it's a hoya carnival. I have one too and it finally bloomed last month. I also have a smaller leaves version called hoya Bella. It's flower are fragrant.
  • Crisdeitz Crisdeitz on Jun 21, 2015
    I have this plant as well. I was told it is a Hoya. I've had it for about 20 years, and it has never flowered for me either. The person who gave it to me had it flowering all the time... If you figure out how to get it to flower, let me know!!
  • Dottie Unruh Dottie Unruh on Jun 21, 2015
    It is definitely a hoya, aka 'Madonna's tears.' You will see tiny drops on the blooms, hence the 'tears.'
  • Gor1416993 Gor1416993 on Jun 21, 2015
    it's a rubber plant
  • Chl315188 Chl315188 on Jun 21, 2015
    It is definitely a Hoya. They do not like to be transplanted or have their roots disturbed. After repoting it can take three years to bloom again. Mine likes bright indirect sun, so I have it in the kitchen above the sink facing northwest. They like humidity also, so that's why it's over the sink. You can spritz it with a spray bottle of water, if there is no humidity. Keep trying different windows until you find one it likes. Mine is very happy and blooms a lot!!!
  • Carole Thomas Carole Thomas on Jun 21, 2015
    My Hoya is on a tall shelf above my front door closet. It blooms about twice a year-- very fragrant :) It came with the house when we bought it 11 yrs ago. so I don't know how old it is.. The home owner told me that a hoya should be "in distress" in order to bloom. We leave it dry out and only water every couple weeks and apparently it likes to be root-bound. I have only transplanted once in the 11 yrs, and planted a cutting that is growing like mad. Mine started to bloom 2 days ago, and they only open at night. The buds looked "plastic" to me at first, and I thought they were something the ( older) lady of the house had placed to make it look "pretty"!. Boy was I wrong! Good luck with this great plant :)
  • DORLIS DORLIS on Jun 21, 2015
    It is a Hoya, I have several different ones. It needs light to bloom. Mine hangs in a south window during the winter and goes outside for the summer. I hang them in an area with some shade. When it blooms, have a putty knnife handy to scraps up the fallen necter, it is very thick and sticky.
  • Janis Hill Janis Hill on Jun 21, 2015
    Yours appears to be a Hoya Obovata Plant. I would suggest you put it outside in dappled shade during the summer months. Allow to go dry between waterings. Do not fertilize! To encourage flowering the next time you empty a milk jug rinse it with just enough water to water your Hoya. You can do this every time you water. Egg shells crushed will add trace amounts of calcium, but the milk residue seems to be more effective and works faster. Hoyas, violets, and other plants just need a little calcium boost to encourage flower formation. Let us know when it flowers again. Should be in just a couple of months!
    • See 3 previous
    • Janey Daly Kearns Janey Daly Kearns on Jun 23, 2015
      Thank you Janis :) That is a good 1 xx
  • Won1803334 Won1803334 on Jun 21, 2015
    I always think the flowers are like little pink velvet stars. I have a varigated Hoya. They can be prone to mealybug.
  • Cheri Cheri on Jun 21, 2015
    I have one of these plants also, a co worker gave it to me when she left our office in 1976! It has only bloomed once, with the pinky purple velvet flowers which also cried. It grows like crazy, through blinds, and I cut back often, but no flowers. I will try the egg shell suggestion. Ty.
  • Lois Franklin Lois Franklin on Jun 21, 2015
    This post makes me so sad. I got a hoya from my sister about 25 years or so ago and it had the most beautiful purple-ish gray 'flowers' that looked like they were plastic or wax - once! I just didn't know what to do to get it to bloom again. Unfortunately, I left it outside too late last winter and it froze completely. I used to get cuttings off my original all the time and they were easy to get started. I just never kept any for myself and now I can't find one anymore. I always put it outside during the summer and brought it in during the winter, until last year. Might know the one time I finally see info about them, is after I lost it! Wish I could find another but you never see these anywhere!
    • See 1 previous
    • Lois Franklin Lois Franklin on Jun 24, 2015
      @Janey Daly Kearns I just put ends like that in water and rooted them. They do root pretty easy. A few years after my sis gave me my plant she somehow lost hers so I was always trying to root more for her. It's just getting them to bloom again that I never could figure out! Even though it's too late for mine, I'm glad I found this post to learn how to do it! The last time I got some rooted, her husband didn't know what was in the baggie by the sink so he threw it away! I meant to do it again and life just got in the way. Maybe some day I'll find another.
  • Kylie Kylie on Jun 21, 2015
    It's a hoya but not an obovata. They actually have round leaves, hence obovata. This is something like a silver slipper I think. You also get one with similar markings on the leaves in pink. Yes you need enough light for them to closer. They only like to be in a small pot.are you fertilising it and have you repotted it to give it fresh soil.do a search on hoyas and you find a lot of info.
  • Lyn Lyn on Jun 21, 2015
    be careful what you wish for--beautiful but for folks who are sensitive, it is awful. My ex literally could not be in the house with it, so it had to go. Hmmm.......
  • Kathy Kathy on Jun 21, 2015
    I have this plant also and it has flowered many times for me. My mother had it in the 70"s. When she died in 1990, I took it and had it ever since, making many rootings in water and replanting and giving to many nieces and friends. I have the main plant which is 45 years old now. Hoya Carnosa is it's botanical name it is a Wax plant. They live long and better the light, may flower more. Need little care.
  • Holly Hasegawa Holly Hasegawa on Jun 21, 2015
    This plant is called a Hoya
  • Marla Rafuse Marla Rafuse on Jun 22, 2015
    I have the exact same plant and it flowered only once for me too. It was my grandmothers. The flowers are really beautiful. I've noticed that these don't like to be moved even when they\re growing leaves. As soon as I'd move a vine it would stop growing so I'm beginning to wonder if that's why it won't flower for me again. I didn't touch the plant or move it for a while and low and behold it grew flowers. I have it in a container on the floor now and I keep moving it to vacuum hence no flowers....the reason maybe?
  • Sunny Sunny on Jun 22, 2015
    I don't know the name of it, but try Miracle Grow Bloom Booster Plant Food.
  • Julia Julia on Jun 22, 2015
    It is a hoya. My mother in law had one in a tree in her shady back yard. It climbed all over the tree and was loaded with its waxy blossoms all the time. I have one in a similar location and it's flowering. I think hoyas require lots and lots of indirect light and plenty of water. Plant them in very porous soil. The squirrels eat the blossoms so if you have a cure for that, please let me know.
  • Marilyn Gordon Marilyn Gordon on Jun 22, 2015
    Yes..Hoya. I started with a tiny piece used for greenery in a vase of 2 roses. From that I have had huge hanging baskets and it is very hardy. I found it blooms when I put it outside in the summer. The blooms do not have a very pleasing odor but they are very interesting in appearance.
  • Katrina Warren Katrina Warren on Jun 22, 2015
    Hoya's have one peculiarity worth noting: their blooms are produced on knobby spurs which should stay on the plant even after blossoms fade. New buds will be generated there to provide bloom the next time. The lesson in this is that to encourage prolific blooming, leave the flower spurs on the plant. Also, for fuller flowering, most growers recommend that the roots be pot-bound. They have one peculiarity worth noting: their blooms are produced on knobby spurs which should stay on the plant even after blossoms fade. New buds will be generated there to provide bloom the next time. The lesson in this is that to encourage prolific blooming, leave the flower spurs on the plant. Also, for fuller flowering, most growers recommend that the roots be pot-bound. The pot you moved your hoya into is probably too large for it.
  • Karimich schmidt Karimich schmidt on Jun 23, 2015
    Definitely agree, it is a hoya plant
  • She1484572 She1484572 on Jun 26, 2015
    My Momma Barb calls it a hindo wedding vine. It is one of the many plants I can't kill
  • Jean Jean on Apr 02, 2016
    Thanks for asking this question. I "inherited" this plant from my sister when she moved to Florida, which was about 2003, it has bloomed only once but what a show! Thanks for all the advice on here, hopefully I can get it to bloom again? Good luck with yours Janey.🙂
  • Holly Hasegawa Holly Hasegawa on Apr 04, 2016
    I know I'm responding alot later than all the other ladies did, I've had my Hoya plant for over18 years, my mother gave it to me when it was just two little leaves and looked liked a rabbit hence the name bunny fru fru, lol. It never blossomed until my mother passed away in 1999, and then all of a sudden it bloomed, and has ever since, up until this last year when it just stopped, so I looked at where it use to blossom, and the nubs as you call them have fallen off, so I'm not sure if it will ever blossom again, but the flowers are very beautiful, and I continue to watch it closely and hope that it will blossom again.
  • Elaine Elaine on Apr 05, 2016
    As you know by now, it is most definitely a "Hoya" plant - sometimes called "Wax Plant". It's impossible to kill, in my opinion. Mine grew and grew but never flowered so I passed it on to a friend with lots of windowsills and more room. Until this post, I completely forgot about it; I must ask her.
  • Liz Pawsey Liz Pawsey on Apr 06, 2016
    Looking at the places the majority of the ladies commenting here live, I suspect it is either too cold or not humid enough for this plant to flower. This is a plant from the tropical parts of Asia and it'll only flower when there is a chance of pollinating insects around. Temperature will play a big part and once it is warm enough, start misting it with a spray water bottle to increase the localised humidity around the plant.
    • DORLIS DORLIS on Feb 19, 2017
      Bring it inside during the winter, set it in an east window, keep its soil moist and it will bloom and grow. I have had one for over 30 years and it has grown beyond it's pot. I have it trained over the window tops half way around the room. When it grows beyond the windows, I cut branches , let them sit for an hour or so, dip them in cinnamon and pot them in moist soil. It is more important to keep the cuttings moist to encourage roots. It has a very thick, sticky necter so get it off floors before it dries or you end up scraping it up with a knife. I love it, but sometimes like when I broke my arm cannot water it as much as I should so it shrivels up a bit. Just start watering it again and it will come back.
  • Faye Campbell Faye Campbell on Apr 06, 2016
    The Hoya is definitely a strong plant and thrives best with sunshine which in my case is well provided in the solarium. I've had one for years. Mine has flowered a number of times . Blossoms emit their strong scent when it gets dark to attract pollinating moths. I've actually cut off their beautiful flowering clusters because I find the scent much too powerful. Hated to do it but I just could not tolerate the sweet odour. It gets dark early in winter in southern Ontario, Canada. I have started new plants with a single leaf . Dip the stem in root grow and leave it in water for a very long time until the roots grow. It seems to take forever but eventually you will be rewarded. Top up the water as it evaporates. Plant in very small pot when the leaf has a healthy root system.
  • Catherine Catherine on Apr 06, 2016
    Jasmine?
  • Rita McKay Rita McKay on Apr 14, 2016
    It's a hoya,... It does very well when it is root bound... I hang mine outside and it blooms nonstop... I've also had it haning in front of a very sunny window and it did real well there as well...
  • Cynlane55 Cynlane55 on Apr 15, 2016
    My Grandma Mcfee had one it was in the porch.(sunroom) Hers' was in a 10 gal. bucket & she had a small trelles, so when it started growing larger she started thumbtacing it to the celing ,the hoya Loved it ,it covered the 30 ft. in about 3 yrs. Bloomed a lot, so I would get it a very large pot, transplant it tell it you are sorry grow it as a climer, it will love you back by blooming. Good Luck last time I seen one bloom was in 1970 an you never forget what it looks like. Cynthia
  • Linda T Linda T on May 23, 2016
    OMG! I had never heard of the Hoya, so I Googled it. Are they WONDERFUL or what? The varieties of flower shapes are splendid and the colours gorgeous! I will be looking out for one from now on, though I doubt our local super market will have such a thing.
  • DORLIS DORLIS on May 24, 2016
    They are addictive! My house is full of them.
  • Kathi Davis Kathi Davis on Sep 05, 2016
    Yes it's a Hoya,i have 2 of them in bloom right now,mine however live outside year round here in S.Cali.
  • Rebecca Bourke Rebecca Bourke on Feb 18, 2017
    Hoya like to be very root bound for continued flowering , and sun to light shade preferred, my Hoya is 4 generations handed down , and only when my mum passed did my poppy as I call her flowers on a regular basis, kept in a carport with morning and scattered afternoon sun, water weekly furtalise yearly , they work well in hanging pots too. Amazing plant indeed xo
  • Mary Mary on Nov 22, 2019

    Looks and sounds like some type of Hoya, there are many. Now you can look it up.