DIY Window Shutter Using An Old Fence Gate

4 Materials
$0
2 Hours
Easy

Our unfinished basement has 6 ugly, fixed windows that are covered with some kind of white plastic, added by the previous owners, and metal mullions that needed some work. One of these windows is visible from the back yard and it's appearance really bothered me.
diy window shutter, curb appeal, diy, repurposing upcycling, woodworking projects
We discussed painting the mullions and removing the white stuff but we didn't want people to be able to see inside, so I came up with the idea to put some kind of window shutter over it.
diy window shutter, curb appeal, diy, repurposing upcycling, woodworking projects
The plan was to do this for free by using the wood from the fence gate that I took down.
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It took two tries to get the shutter looking the way we wanted but it all worked out in the end.
diy window shutter
Once it was up like we wanted, I used some dark walnut stain and added some faux hinges and a lock to make it look more authentic, even though it doesn't open and close. A free and easy fix for one o our unsightly basement windows.

Just a note about safety in case of fire. The 6 windows in our unfinished basement don't open and would have to be broken in case of emergency, in which case we could easily push through the shutter to get out if needed.

Check out chatfieldcourt.com to see how it turned out. You can also check out our projects page, here, to see all of our easy and inexpensive DIY projects.

Resources for this project:

ALAZA Antique Old Metal Lock On Rusty...
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Kristi @ Chatfield Court

Want more details about this and other DIY projects? Check out my blog post!

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Have a question about this project?

3 questions
  • Christine Styron Feit
    on Dec 1, 2015

    I love it...can you kindly tell me how you attached them?

    • Kristi @ Chatfield Court
      on Dec 4, 2015

      @Christine Styron Feit Hi Christine. Actually we just wedged some wood around the window frame and screwed the shutter to that. We didn't screw anything into the house. Hope that helps.

  • Dpbeee2
    on Feb 2, 2018

    That is a really great looking shutter! Doesnt it block out the light? Can it be opened from the inside.
  • Carol Cole
    on Mar 29, 2019

    Where is the finished item?

Join the conversation

3 of 139 comments
  • JudyH
    on Mar 31, 2018

    Really ingenious solution to cover an eyesore! I love it! Don't understand the ho-blah-blah about the basement windows escape route. The last place you run in an emergency it down toward it.

    • Jon
      on Sep 9, 2018

      Hi as a 40+ year firefighter let me advise. The issue is you don’t run downstairs in a fire, you are trying to escape it. Slot of the basements are living/sleeping areas. If the fire is above you or at the stairs, or the top of the stairs ( alot enter from a kitchen which is prone to fire) you need window escapes. Breaking a window to escape or yell to get help is critical. Also breaking open to allow smoke out and fresh air in. And as a First Responder I want to look in every window to look for victims. They are cute, but be careful how you attach to not get trapped in the event (maybe unlikely) of an incident.

  • Ella Frierson Bond
    on Aug 26, 2018

    I would not do this to an egress window. In most places this would make it an illegal egress window. I am assuming that they are legal size and proportions now.

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