Patricia M
Patricia M
  • Hometalker
  • Saint Louis, MO
Asked on Feb 5, 2013

heated floors

KMS WoodworksLandlightSPatricia M
+8

Answered

I've seen them install heated floors many times on HGTV. We have a concrete slab in our kitchen and it radiates the cold. We've had to keep carpeting in there :( but it is still cold in the winter. What is the expense of these floors and could they be put on concrete with some other type of flooring without standing above the flow into the next room? Thanks
11 answers
  • There are several products that can be purchased at the big box stores that fill this bill. However radiant heat systems need to be installed below the tile or wood on the floor. So unless your going to install a new floor, there is limited things that you can do, They do make radiant panels that are mounted on the ceiling of the room that will work, but you need to have a electrical contractor wire them in once mounted. What type of heat does the house currently have now?

  • KMS Woodworks
    on Feb 6, 2013

    I have installed a number of electric radiant systems under tile. some on slab other on subfloors with backer. If your slab is not insulated underneath it would use a bit more power. Ideally these systems are installed as Hydronic system In the slab itself. This type of heating is good for background or steady heat...the response time on these can be hours and hours. unlike a force air system which can respond in minutes.

  • Patricia M
    on Feb 6, 2013

    Wow, I didn't know any of this. Our house is 41 yrs. old and when they poured the first floor, the concrete was put into the kitchen and living room. (its a tri-level) The biggest problem is they didn't put a freeze wall between kitchen and patio. I would love to have wood or tile flooring, but its impossible. Too cold. If its that much of a job and it takes so long to respond, it may not be the answer. Because of these floors, we've had to have our gas furnace vents put into the ceiling. Our lower level is fine and upstairs bedrooms are warm, but this is a good reason for me not to want to stay in the kitchen and cook !!

  • Patricia, KMS was correct on the fact radiant heat takes time to heat up. However if your using it as a primary heat for the floor, It will take a few hours for the floor to come up to temp, but once it has and you leave the thermostat alone, the floor will remain warm under your feet. If you put an electrical mat under the floor, there are radiant reflectors that can be placed below them to direct the warmth upward and not down into the slab. Then using a pour type floor leveling compound you cover the mat and place a click and lock floor if your looking for wood down. If your gong with tile, You simply embed the mat into the thin set material that your using to hold the tile down. Another method is to install a under cabinet heater. This electrical device has a blower and a control that will blow hot air across the floor helping it warm up a bit on the surface. It works OK, but radiant heat is the best method to use in your case.

  • Patricia M
    on Feb 7, 2013

    Thank you so much for this info. I'm going to show it to our son to see if he can do this. If we must have it done professionally, do you have an approximate cost? I would prefer the lock together wood flooring. Thanks so much, all.

  • KMS Woodworks
    on Feb 7, 2013

    Check out this project... http://www.hometalk.com/533239/small-bath-flooring-project I have used "suntouch" and "warmly yours" systems they are both comparable in cost.

  • I would not even try to tell you what it would cost. Size, electrical, type of floor all play a mix in this cost. There are lots of videos on the web on how to install these heating systems, and most are pretty installer friendly and can be installed by most handy people. But for cost, I am afraid your on your own on that.

  • LandlightS
    on Feb 8, 2013

    Patricia.....electrically, you are looking a adding a dedicated 20 amp circuit for a Suntouch or Warmly Yours heating systems., I've installed many system and the fee usually runs about $400......which includes laying out the mesh/heating system on the sub-floor. This includes all testing and recording the resistance readings of each section. The major problem is in the person who sets the tile........if they have never covers the heating mesh in thin set, they must be very careful not to damage the heating mesh in any manner. if it is damaged.....it is not fun to repair. I always recheck the resistance reading before the tile is set in place. Once you have the joy of a warmed tile floor...you'll never go back Good luck...Gary

  • Patricia M
    on Feb 8, 2013

    Thank you guys for a glimpse of hope. Our kitchen is very small, about 10 x 10. If we could have someone install the mesh/heating system...perhaps we can just go ahead and have them install the flooring. Would you suggest a place like Home Depot or Lowe's? Too bad none of you are closer :(

  • LandlightS
    on Feb 9, 2013

    Home Depot and Lowe's use contractors for their installation who are independent and are not employees. They are licensed and do carry full insurance and the only advantage is that HD and Lowe's stand behind their work. I would search for an independent ceramic contractor who is familiar with heated floors. Just make sure you check their references. If you need any further assistance, contact me at landlights@gmail.com Gary

  • KMS Woodworks
    on Feb 9, 2013

    bedding the heating mat is a poured "level mix" will protect it from damage when the tile is set, I have used a hot melt glue gun to "tack" the thermostat sensor and some of the smaller sections prior to adding the level mix. Once the level mix sets ( about 4 hours) you can walk on it. I like to let that cure for a full day though before setting tile

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