Wheelchair Accessible Ramps DIY for the Home

These ramps are also great for people with mobility issues (after a surgery or with elderly family members). Ramps are customized to our space, and easy to make for yourself.
These ramps are also great for people with mobility issues (after a surgery or with elderly family members). Ramps are customized to our space, and easy to make for yourself. We've also painted them with a non-skid paint.
The bracers on the back allow for support and act as handles when we need to move the ramps. http://lifecurrents.dw2.net/wheelchair-accessible-ramps/

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  • Liliana Wells Liliana Wells on Apr 06, 2014
    Great idea!
  • Aunt Jane Aunt Jane on Jul 07, 2015
    When planning any project involving accessibility for people with disabilities, universal design or "aging-in-place," look for the most current updates on ADA (the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990) standards for guidance. While the ADA is law, it applies to public places and private places serving the public. It does not have legal bearing on private residences. But a wise DIY'er or home contractor will use its guidelines; it has worked out so many safety details most people would never consider until after Grandma fell on a poorly designed DIY project. Ramps, for example, must be at least 12" long for each inch in height. The 1:12 ratio keeps the ramp from being too steep for unsteady feet or any mobility device—canes, crutches & walkers as well as wheelchairs— to be safely used. As a bonus, I've found that is true if the ramp is used to move other loads, too. When there is not enough straight space to run a ramp, look to a curved or switchback design. I see some problems in the photos above. The two ramps in the top photo really must line up with each other. That too-short turning space between the two is a setup for a fall for anyone on unsteady feet or with vision or cognitive problems. I would also do away with the little door mat between them. If it is there to address some problem, more thought needs to go into its solution. The ADA says ramps must also have at least a safety lip along any open sides, which can be set off visually with paint or reflective tape for added safety. Hand rails are also a big safety feature to consider. Don't forget the non-skid surface, maybe coarse sand in the paint, as mentioned in the article above!
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